U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-06-2011, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
26,326 posts, read 12,805,914 times
Reputation: 8189
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemycomputer90 View Post
Not sure how accurate this source is, but still interesting nonetheless.

Climate of Australia
Interesting article. So maybe you won't get a bigger ice sheet at all, but smaller?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-06-2011, 12:37 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
10,420 posts, read 5,475,173 times
Reputation: 4810
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Interesting article. So maybe you won't get a bigger ice sheet at all, but smaller?
That sounds about right. My uneducated guess is that Antarctica would get warmer. One would assume southern Australia would get cooler, but I'm not so sure about that. So perhaps Australia wouldn't be an extreme version of Canada afterall. But this is assuming that Australia is in it's current position. The subject is a bit more complicated than I thought.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-09-2011, 12:04 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,693 posts, read 17,341,671 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by ricardobrazil View Post
I think it's because Australia it's on a free path to cold coming fom Antartica. If you had something like Andes or Himalaia on its way, probably you'd be warmer.

Weirdly, I think mountain ranges do indeed help to keep the cold away in places like the Southwest US. LA's winter highs of 20C/68F and even warmer inland always seemed peculiarly warm, since a place at a similar latitude in Australia would be closer to 16-17C. Even factoring in the many sunny days it still doesn't add up. The only explanation I can come up with is that mountains somehow shield it from the cold of the interior.

You forget about a little thing called the ocean. The fact we have like 3,000 km of ocean between us and Antarctica means all that Antarctic air really does nothing to cool us down during winter or summer. No, the cooler summers are to do with the strong oceanic influence in the warmer months.

In Australia, heating/cooling isn't really affected by frontal activity so much as the landmass itself heating and cooling. Although polar airmasses can reduce temps in southern Oz, they're so moderated by the ocean they're scarcely polar anymore. The northern outback is too far away for that anyway so it's more a case of extreme high pressure causing extreme diurnal range.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2011, 02:05 PM
 
3 posts, read 2,357 times
Reputation: 15
southern hemisphere is always colder than its northern hemisphere counterparts pound for pound , mainly because Antarctica is a lot colder than the Arctic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2011, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,598 posts, read 14,998,024 times
Reputation: 3236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
In Australia, heating/cooling isn't really affected by frontal activity so much as the landmass itself heating and cooling. Although polar airmasses can reduce temps in southern Oz, they're so moderated by the ocean they're scarcely polar anymore. The northern outback is too far away for that anyway so it's more a case of extreme high pressure causing extreme diurnal range.
In Australind,
it feels like a polar front brings a 2-4 C (4-7 F) temp drop,
15+km/h (10mph+) windspeed increase
and a "feels like" temp dropping only as much as 10 C/18 F.

Back in Toronto, polar-anything means a minimum of 7 C/13 F drop in temps alone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2011, 06:39 PM
 
Location: PA
18,260 posts, read 8,329,180 times
Reputation: 7662
Well, I've watched Survivorman with Les Stroud before, and he went to the Outback during the warmer part of the year, and he said that when the sun falls, the temperatures in the Outback drop dramatically and you need to be near a fire to keep warm. Also learned in school, that the same thing happens in the Sahara. The days are hot like hell, and the nights are freezing. It's just the nature of the desert, IMO
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2011, 06:46 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,693 posts, read 17,341,671 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Well, I've watched Survivorman with Les Stroud before, and he went to the Outback during the warmer part of the year, and he said that when the sun falls, the temperatures in the Outback drop dramatically and you need to be near a fire to keep warm. Also learned in school, that the same thing happens in the Sahara. The days are hot like hell, and the nights are freezing. It's just the nature of the desert, IMO
Yes and no. That applies during the cooler months, but summer nights in most of the hot deserts of the world are hot. Phoenix in the desert has an average July low of about 26.6C/80F these days, I certainly wouldn't call that cold. Most of the northern Outback has summer minimums of at least 21C/70F, which again would feel distinctly warm for a night, since after a 45C day, for instance, it would still be something like 33-34C at sunset. There are certainly days when it can go from freezing to 30C, but they tend to occur in the Spring or Autumn months. Days where it's very cold at night and very hot in the day do occur but in summer it tends to be always hot, and winter days are generally more warm than very hot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2011, 06:48 PM
 
Location: PA
18,260 posts, read 8,329,180 times
Reputation: 7662
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Yes and no. That applies during the cooler months, but summer nights in most of the hot deserts of the world are hot. Phoenix in the desert has an average July low of about 26.6C/80F these days, I certainly wouldn't call that cold. Most of the northern Outback has summer minimums of at least 21C/70F, which again would feel distinctly warm for a night, since after a 45C day, for instance, it would still be something like 33-34C at sunset. There are certainly days when it can go from freezing to 30C, but they tend to occur in the Spring or Autumn months. Days where it's very cold at night and very hot in the day do occur but in summer it tends to be always hot, and winter days are generally more warm than very hot.
You're right, I forgot to add that I'm talking about the uninhabited parts of the deserts, far from any city. My mistake But, yes you are right. Summer nights are still comfortably warm in the cities
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2011, 06:58 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,693 posts, read 17,341,671 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
You're right, I forgot to add that I'm talking about the uninhabited parts of the deserts, far from any city. My mistake But, yes you are right. Summer nights are still comfortably warm in the cities
Yeah I wonder where Les Stroud was talking about...the southern deserts like the Great Victoria Desert and the Nullabor (which by rainfall is arid) can get coolish in summer, but even remote parts of the northern deserts remain hot at night. In the Southwest US the heat island effect makes things even worse...I hear it's not uncommon for the mercury to remain above 30C all night long in Phoenix these days.

Death Valley has the highest July minimum of about 30C (86F) in the lower 48 states. I can barely imagine how oppressive that can be. I read somewhere their highest ever minimum there was 39.5C (103F). Similar conditions are found in parts of the Middle East.

But either way, when they say deserts are scorching in the daytime and freezing at night it is a bit misleading.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2011, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
26,326 posts, read 12,805,914 times
Reputation: 8189
I think just about all hot deserts have warm to hot summer nights. Excluding ones at high latitude (like deserts in Washington State) or high altitude, I can't think of any exceptions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top