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Old 05-11-2011, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
772 posts, read 594,861 times
Reputation: 456
Just my two cents.
I have a female friend who loves warm an hot weather (I, on the contrary, like the cold). I always tell her that she's cold-blooded, like reptiles are...

I tend to think that I like the cold weather because, in fact, I'm very warm-blooded... It makes sense to think of it this way.

This doesn't mean that I can walk around in a t-shirt and shorts when it's freezing. It just means that I like the feel of being dressed for the cold and actually walking outside (for a period of time, of course). It's certainly much more comfortable than walking outside in a t-shirt and shorts under scorching 38 C (100 F), and sweating like a pig.

But, leaving aside the extremes, I also enjoy mild weather, say 20 to 23 C (68 to 73 F) when I can walk outside without sweating and feeling a cool breeze on my face.

BTW, IMO, there are many things that are more comfortable doing in the winter than in the summer (here I' comparing the extremes). For example: working, studying, gathering at a crowded place (like a concert - ie the warmth that the crowd produces makes you comfortable, whereas in the extreme heat it would be a pain in the neck).

Cheers
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Old 05-11-2011, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Buxton, England
7,039 posts, read 3,447,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanfel View Post
Just my two cents.
I have a female friend who loves warm an hot weather (I, on the contrary, like the cold). I always tell her that she's cold-blooded, like reptiles are...

I tend to think that I like the cold weather because, in fact, I'm very warm-blooded... It makes sense to think of it this way.
Cold/warm blooded, utter nonsense. All humans are mammals and therefore warm blooded. Metabolic differences and rate, height, body type, body fat %, blood pressure all affect what temperatures people prefer.
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Old 05-11-2011, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
772 posts, read 594,861 times
Reputation: 456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weatherfan2 View Post
Cold/warm blooded, utter nonsense. All humans are mammals and therefore warm blooded. Metabolic differences and rate, height, body type, body fat %, blood pressure all affect what temperatures people prefer.
Yes, I know that. I thought it was plainly clear that the reference to "cold-blooded" was a metaphor. Anyway, I'm not an expert, nor did I intend my post to be from an expert point of view. But more or less that's what I meant, that different factors affect different people while we all are warm-blooded.

Cheers,
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Old 05-11-2011, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
25,197 posts, read 11,645,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanfel View Post

BTW, IMO, there are many things that are more comfortable doing in the winter than in the summer (here I' comparing the extremes). For example: working, studying, gathering at a crowded place (like a concert - ie the warmth that the crowd produces makes you comfortable, whereas in the extreme heat it would be a pain in the neck).
Meh no matter how many people a winter outdoor concert is not fun. Not too many people want stand outside all bundled up in coats and gloves. Haven't heard of outdoor winter concerts much. I've been to outdoor concerts in very hot weather and everyone seemed to tolerate it. A decent breeze and everyone's standing still and people are ok.

Last concert I was in, was in July when it was around 26C with a dewpoint about 24C. Sun was setting, a bit hazy and foggy and the singer remarked on the beautiful evening and everyone seemed happy.
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Old 05-11-2011, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,339 posts, read 2,602,765 times
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Outdoor winter concerts are probably not going to be common in places where it's freezing or below in the winter, I'm guessing.

And temperatures like 25C/26C are good for going to the beach, hanging out at the park, having a picnic etc. in my view.
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Old 05-11-2011, 11:46 PM
 
5,434 posts, read 3,611,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bustaduke View Post
The cold and flu season is during the winter because most people are indoors. You can still get a cold or flu during the summer if you come in contact with someone who's sick.

Being indoors during the winter traps the virus indoors where most people are and that's why more people get sick then. Has nothing to do with the temperature

busta
Yes, this is true, and also buildings that lack fresh air can also have an effect. I got a lot more colds, and they happened year round when I lived in San Diego because I worked in an enclosed building with sealed windows, when I moved to Detroit and started working in a building with fresh air I went down to one cold or less per year.
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Old 05-11-2011, 11:53 PM
 
5,434 posts, read 3,611,817 times
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I don't really understand the point of this thread, there are very few places that people live that don't get warm weather at least two months if the year.

Everyone has a temperature preference, it's never right or wrong to prefer a certain type of weather. I find hot humid weather tortuous, and would rather live in Siberia than down south, others love the heat, so what? I lived in San Diego which many would consider perfect, I found it boring, and it's also desert so there is no "real" greenery, anything that's green there means wasted water in an area that is likely to have water issues in the future.
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Old 05-12-2011, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
5,526 posts, read 3,740,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
Outdoor winter concerts are probably not going to be common in places where it's freezing or below in the winter, I'm guessing.

And temperatures like 25C/26C are good for going to the beach, hanging out at the park, having a picnic etc. in my view.
Or where it's excessively wet in the winter like here. I've never seen an outdoor concert in Vancouver although when the Olympics were on you could say that we had an outdoor street party but that was a bit of a special occasion and the weather really was mild so we were lucky.
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Old 05-12-2011, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
772 posts, read 594,861 times
Reputation: 456
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Meh no matter how many people a winter outdoor concert is not fun. Not too many people want stand outside all bundled up in coats and gloves. Haven't heard of outdoor winter concerts much. I've been to outdoor concerts in very hot weather and everyone seemed to tolerate it. A decent breeze and everyone's standing still and people are ok.

Last concert I was in, was in July when it was around 26C with a dewpoint about 24C. Sun was setting, a bit hazy and foggy and the singer remarked on the beautiful evening and everyone seemed happy.
Well, in fact, I meant any crowded place, also inside a building. The thing is, in a mild winter like we get here, buildings don't have such complex systems of heating (in general, though there are exceptions). Inside houses, usually single stoves for each room will do. Therefore, all this amounts to having the interiors not so well heated in the end (we'll only suffer that just two or three times a year, when we have frosts... the rest will not be much of a problem).

Also, in our type of winter, having outdoor gatherings is still possible many times. I remember concerts here with at least 4 C in the evening-night. I suppose you wouldn't consider that cold.

Cheers,
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Old 12-29-2011, 04:17 PM
 
1,914 posts, read 2,413,109 times
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in South Florida, vegetables and other crops are grown from November through May. It is too hot, rainy, and humid during our rainy season (June-October). Beans, squash, tomatos, corn, etc. are grown during the winter/spring - our dry season. Night temperatures in the summer are usually 78 to 83. Daytime temps range from 88 to 94 every single day for about 6 months. Rain cools the temps briefly.....down to ~ 75. Then steam rises from the hot pavement of roads!!
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