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Old 05-16-2011, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,338 posts, read 5,119,672 times
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A lot of the times many of us dispute how warm it has to be before it feels summery (assuming you live in a climate that you can recognize a distinct summer, which would include the American subtropics, but not somewhere as tropical as Honolulu). For heat-lovers, maritime climes like the Pacific Northwest or much of the UK are often criticized for its summers not feeling "like summer enough" but more like just spring or even verging on "subarctic" summers, while others say it's perfectly refreshing and represents an ideal summer season.

To some, highs of 70F would be enough to qualify as a summer month, to others it'd feel like summer has barely started, and to yet others, it's even already warmer than they'd like.

I personally find a rule of thumb for me to think of summer is when it is noticeably warmer in daytime high than just a room temperature. This is the kind of weather people would go to the beach for. Many people would start using A/C when it's "really summer". In my climate, I would say July and August (highs of around 77-80F) and the hotter parts of June (June's high being nearer to 74F) feel like real summer. In September (the high 68-70F) and sometimes as early as late August, there is a noticeable period where people seem to feel summer's ending, perhaps around the month's start, middle or end (depending on the year-to-year situation). Around mid-to late September at the least, it seems, the heating needs to be turned on here.

So, I'd peg summer in Toronto as being late June-early September, but with the "heart" of summer being the dog days, when 80-90F can feel common in July/August but more rarely outside of it.

What is your personal definition/criteria of what a "real" summer feels like?
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Old 05-16-2011, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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A real summer to me is at least mid 80s Fahrenheit.. which Vancouver might get once or twice a year if we're really lucky... hence no real summer
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Old 05-16-2011, 10:13 PM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 7,739,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
A lot of the times many of us dispute how warm it has to be before it feels summery (assuming you live in a climate that you can recognize a distinct summer, which would include the American subtropics, but not somewhere as tropical as Honolulu). For heat-lovers, maritime climes like the Pacific Northwest or much of the UK are often criticized for its summers not feeling "like summer enough" but more like just spring or even verging on "subarctic" summers, while others say it's perfectly refreshing and represents an ideal summer season.

To some, highs of 70F would be enough to qualify as a summer month, to others it'd feel like summer has barely started, and to yet others, it's even already warmer than they'd like.

I personally find a rule of thumb for me to think of summer is when it is noticeably warmer in daytime high than just a room temperature. This is the kind of weather people would go to the beach for. Many people would start using A/C when it's "really summer". In my climate, I would say July and August (highs of around 77-80F) and the hotter parts of June (June's high being nearer to 74F) feel like real summer. In September (the high 68-70F) and sometimes as early as late August, there is a noticeable period where people seem to feel summer's ending, perhaps around the month's start, middle or end (depending on the year-to-year situation). Around mid-to late September at the least, it seems, the heating needs to be turned on here.

So, I'd peg summer in Toronto as being late June-early September, but with the "heart" of summer being the dog days, when 80-90F can feel common in July/August but more rarely outside of it.

What is your personal definition/criteria of what a "real" summer feels like?
Here in the Tri-State area (NY/NJ/CT) I think summer starts when we see 80 F or higher, which often comes in mid May or so and lasts till around mid September. “High summer” is when I feel the Bermuda High pumping those 70 F + dew points into our area…mostly mid June to late August. On the other hand, after living in south Florida for a few years - real summer (or high summer) seemed much more tied to when it turned wetter and more humid (around early May or so to mid October). In fact, summer in south Florida/Miami, with the splash and dash thundersqualls and partly cloudy skies, often felt cooler than the late March – mid May time which was often clear blue skies and blazing sunshine.
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Old 05-16-2011, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Orinda, CA
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Around here in the east bay we have 2 definitions of summer:

a) From the first major heat wave (over 90F throughout the entire east bay) to the last major heat wave.
b) From the last spring rain to the first autumn rain. (of course, this is irrelevant when we have those freak August storms)
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Old 05-17-2011, 12:37 AM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
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It really depends on the overall picture of the climate I'm in. For example, Seattle's summers are spectacularly gorgeous with a July and August average high of 75 degrees, and with drier and sunnier conditions than the rest of the year. (Seattle winters SUCK, BTW. Too mild temperature wise, and WAY TOO RAINY!!!).

In the Wenatchee area of Eastern Washington, to where I am currently trying to relocate, the average highs of July and August are 88 and 87 degrees, respectively, which I would find too hot ordinarily, but it is a dry heat. The low humidity makes these summers quite tolerable and enjoyable. (The winters in the area are much more proper than Seattle's, too, which I also like!).

Should I move to a more extreme climate, (such as I hope to do someday and spend a year or two (or more!) in Alaska), I would willingly accept at least one month with a 65 degree or higher average high (with at least one more month of 60 or better, but doesn't have to be as high as 65). My current top choice in Alaska, which is Fairbanks, may have very cold winters (not complaining!), but they also have not one, but two months in the summer with an average high in the low 70s, with a third month averaging in the high 60s, and a fourth averaging in the low 60s. More than good enough for me. (My current, very close second choice of Wasilla has four months of 60 or better (with July being an even 70)).
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Old 05-17-2011, 01:41 AM
 
Location: Newcastle NSW Australia
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Generally once the temp gets over 80F, or high 20's C.
This can start as early as October, but this is short lived and doesn't ""set in"" until late November.
I like a good solid 4 months of summerish weather, with the obligatory 2 week heat-wave around Australia Day to early February.
Most summers are fairly consistent here and hot, especially as I am not right on the coast.
Where I work, in the Lower Hunter Valley, can see consistently around the 95F mark, or mid=30's, for a few weeks.
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Old 05-17-2011, 02:06 AM
 
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
1,709 posts, read 2,380,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek40 View Post
Generally once the temp gets over 80F, or high 20's C.
This can start as early as October, but this is short lived and doesn't ""set in"" until late November.
This is about the same for my area (as early as April, but not setting in until late May), but temperatures need to get above 85F/30C instead.
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Old 05-17-2011, 03:24 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Summer feeling (in terms of warmth ONLY) :

Minimum : coastal Sydney (18-25°C / 65-77°F)
Enjoyable : Nice (20-28°C / 68-82°F)
Optimal : Hong Kong in late Sep/early Oct (24-30°C / 75-86°F)
Excessive : average high above 35°C/95°F
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Old 05-17-2011, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Connecticut
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For me at least highs in the mid 80's. preferably in the high 80's or low 90's and not just the temps that matter, just as importantly it's the duration of the hot temps. I'd want it like that for at least 2 solid months--preferably 3.

That doesn't mean I mind some days with highs in the 70's or even 60's mixed in, but its more the prevailing temps.

I need the above mentioned conditions to get the winter chill out of me totally---at least mentally!
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Old 05-17-2011, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Queens, NY
654 posts, read 1,044,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wavehunter007 View Post
Here in the Tri-State area (NY/NJ/CT) I think summer starts when we see 80 F or higher, which often comes in mid May or so and lasts till around mid September. “High summer” is when I feel the Bermuda High pumping those 70 F + dew points into our area…mostly mid June to late August. On the other hand, after living in south Florida for a few years - real summer (or high summer) seemed much more tied to when it turned wetter and more humid (around early May or so to mid October). In fact, summer in south Florida/Miami, with the splash and dash thundersqualls and partly cloudy skies, often felt cooler than the late March – mid May time which was often clear blue skies and blazing sunshine.
I agree, I couldn't have said it better myself.
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