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Old 05-31-2011, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Manila
744 posts, read 739,092 times
Reputation: 434
I think this debate should be separated into coldest winters and coldest summers categories. For coldest winters, cities that have AT LEAST one reading below 0F (-18C) should be given consideration and for those that rarely (or never) ever get to 32C (90F) or above at all should be considered for the latter. Thinks get clearer that way! Thanks!
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Old 05-31-2011, 10:46 PM
 
4,810 posts, read 4,886,413 times
Reputation: 2437
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrconfusion87 View Post
I think this debate should be separated into coldest winters and coldest summers categories. For coldest winters, cities that have AT LEAST one reading below 0F (-18C) should be given consideration and for those that rarely (or never) ever get to 32C (90F) or above at all should be considered for the latter. Thinks get clearer that way! Thanks!
Well I already had two different cold categories from my original post. One for coldest winters and one for coldest summers.
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Old 06-23-2011, 11:49 AM
 
224 posts, read 360,352 times
Reputation: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
LOL.

Because you and ben86 sure like to be rude and act like smart asses me and say I am wrong with what I said when I was always right what I said. Both of you just misinterpreted.

NO. I already said that I know England and Britain is different. Scotland is not a part of England but it is a part of Britain/UK. And Scotland and Irish cities are colder than cities in England. Scotland and England are different.

And I honestly don't care anymore. For England I only like London and Brighton, For Scotland which is part of Great Britain/UK whatever I only like Edinburgh.

People in Scotland probably get very irritated when people from England try to sound so imperialistic and say Scotland/Scottish people are "British." I am sure they rather be called "Scottish" and not be associated with England/Great Britain and the United Kingdom in general.
Doesnt matter if they get annoyed or not. It doesnt change the fact that scottish people are BRITISH.

Same way that british people might not like being labelled as Europeans. They dont believe in a Federal Europe but it doesnt change the fact that Great Britain is situated in Europe therefore they are european!

You cant pick and chose what to call people. We label people according to their geographical location and SCOTLAND IS A COUNTRY ON THE ISLE OF GREAT BRITAIN THEREFORE BRITISH.
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Old 06-23-2011, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Scotland
431 posts, read 326,905 times
Reputation: 387
As to the original topic, can I say that Shenyang is pretty damn cold?
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Old 06-23-2011, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque
6,506 posts, read 6,780,666 times
Reputation: 6711
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDanishGuy View Post
Doesnt matter if they get annoyed or not. It doesnt change the fact that scottish people are BRITISH.

Same way that british people might not like being labelled as Europeans. They dont believe in a Federal Europe but it doesnt change the fact that Great Britain is situated in Europe therefore they are european!

You cant pick and chose what to call people. We label people according to their geographical location and SCOTLAND IS A COUNTRY ON THE ISLE OF GREAT BRITAIN THEREFORE BRITISH.
Whenever I meet anyone from the north of England or Scotland, they say Britain is not in Europe, but off the coast of Europe (with a wink ;-)

I have met peninsular Scandinavians with a similar opinion.
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Old 06-24-2011, 07:01 AM
 
224 posts, read 360,352 times
Reputation: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Whenever I meet anyone from the north of England or Scotland, they say Britain is not in Europe, but off the coast of Europe (with a wink ;-)

I have met peninsular Scandinavians with a similar opinion.
You just proved my point lol. Great Britain and Scandinavia are a part of Europe. Anybody who denies that is dumb.

Now many people in these areas do not like being called European because of the European Union. Its not the continent they don't like it's the politics of it lol.

Same way for Scotland. Unionist Protestants in Scotland will have no issue with being called British because they like the fact that they are a part of the United Kingdom. Being British has begun to mean that you're a part of the UK so people that dislike the UK don't like to be labelled as British.
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Old 06-24-2011, 09:05 AM
 
15,991 posts, read 9,019,997 times
Reputation: 6036
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Whenever I meet anyone from the north of England or Scotland, they say Britain is not in Europe, but off the coast of Europe (with a wink ;-)
I read a couple of days ago that according to recent research about half of all Brits have German ancestors, which didn't go down well with some notorious anti-Europeans and anti-Krauts on the isles

Half of Britons have German blood... so it's time to embrace your inner Jerry! | Mail Online

(Those findings also make the US much more German than previously thought.)
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Old 06-24-2011, 10:14 AM
 
5,835 posts, read 4,111,187 times
Reputation: 3214
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Whenever I meet anyone from the north of England or Scotland, they say Britain is not in Europe, but off the coast of Europe (with a wink ;-)

I have met peninsular Scandinavians with a similar opinion.
So Brits like to feel special - what's a big deal.
Be sensitive, don't hurt their feelings please ( and feelings of "peninsular Sacandinavians," apparently...)
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Old 06-24-2011, 10:15 AM
 
5,835 posts, read 4,111,187 times
Reputation: 3214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I read a couple of days ago that according to recent research about half of all Brits have German ancestors, which didn't go down well with some notorious anti-Europeans and anti-Krauts on the isles

Half of Britons have German blood... so it's time to embrace your inner Jerry! | Mail Online

(Those findings also make the US much more German than previously thought.)
Jesus Christ! You people are everywhere

PS. Just don't tell those things to Brits - it might be upsetting...
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Old 06-24-2011, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque
6,506 posts, read 6,780,666 times
Reputation: 6711
Well, in the United States, people of English ancestry (and the whole Anglo-sphere for that matter) are often referred to as 'Anglo-Saxon' (often as part of the acronym WASP).

It is no mystery that that is the name of two Germanic tribes.
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