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Old 08-08-2007, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
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Can anyone answer this old question of mine? Why does the sun feel sooo much hotter in Arizona than it does in, say, Pennsylvania?
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Old 08-08-2007, 03:27 PM
940
 
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Steve-o...I'm gonna take a stab at it and say that I think it's partly due to the angle of the sun at lower latitudes (Arizona)...the closer you are to the equator, the stronger the sun will be. Hence, the further south you are in the US (and thereby "closer" to the equator), the stronger the sun's influence and rays and that, in turn, brings on the higher temperatures and the brighter skies.
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Old 08-08-2007, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 940 View Post
Steve-o...I'm gonna take a stab at it and say that I think it's partly due to the angle of the sun at lower latitudes (Arizona)...the closer you are to the equator, the stronger the sun will be. Hence, the further south you are in the US (and thereby "closer" to the equator), the stronger the sun's influence and rays and that, in turn, brings on the higher temperatures and the brighter skies.
Ive taken that into consideration, but I also have to think about Florida. Their sun is warm, but nowhere near as hot as AZ's, and they never break 100 degrees. Do you think the sun's potency is hampered by humidity levels?
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Old 08-08-2007, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Ive taken that into consideration, but I also have to think about Florida. Their sun is warm, but nowhere near as hot as AZ's, and they never break 100 degrees. Do you think the sun's potency is hampered by humidity levels?
I think you're on to something because I believe that the humidity levels do impact how "hot" the sun actually feels. Parts of Brazil are very close to the equator but they don't feel as hot to me because of all the humidity in the air there...and they aren't prone to the relentless 105-110 degree heat as in the desert southwest of the US. Same with Florida...the humidity/high dew points help to stop the temperature climbs. I also think a constant sea breeze off the water helps temper the heat or at least the feel of it in FL.

Arizona is so dry that I think the lack of much humidity does make the temps (and therefore the sun's heat) much more intense, IMHO.
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Old 08-08-2007, 06:11 PM
 
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Default tossing some pennies in......

Maybe it is because it is a dry air in AZ compared to PA??????? The dewpoints in PA are higher??????
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Old 08-08-2007, 06:12 PM
 
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Default lol,

late again due to dial up,
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Old 08-09-2007, 12:21 AM
Status: "Done with the 100s (hopefully)?" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: East Central Phoenix
5,411 posts, read 8,293,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 940 View Post
I think you're on to something because I believe that the humidity levels do impact how "hot" the sun actually feels. Parts of Brazil are very close to the equator but they don't feel as hot to me because of all the humidity in the air there...and they aren't prone to the relentless 105-110 degree heat as in the desert southwest of the US. Same with Florida...the humidity/high dew points help to stop the temperature climbs. I also think a constant sea breeze off the water helps temper the heat or at least the feel of it in FL.

Arizona is so dry that I think the lack of much humidity does make the temps (and therefore the sun's heat) much more intense, IMHO.
That is absolutely correct. Plus, you have to consider WHY the summer heat in Phoenix seems to be worse than many other desert locations. It's the concrete & asphalt effect, which actually makes the temperature hotter while in the blazing sun ... and this helps to hold in the heat during the night, which contributes to the urban heat island effect. That's why low temps are seldom below 90 degrees during the summer, except when there's high dew points or thunderstorms in the area.

Quite frankly, I would much rather have 90 degrees with clouds & higher humidity than 110 degrees with sunshine & 10% humidity. The latter gets sooooo monotonous after a while anyway!
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Old 08-09-2007, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Seattle
6,355 posts, read 8,545,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 940 View Post
Steve-o...I'm gonna take a stab at it and say that I think it's partly due to the angle of the sun at lower latitudes (Arizona)...the closer you are to the equator, the stronger the sun will be. Hence, the further south you are in the US (and thereby "closer" to the equator), the stronger the sun's influence and rays and that, in turn, brings on the higher temperatures and the brighter skies.
I don't agree that (because Phoenix it's closer to the equator). In Seattle the sun is very strong too
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Old 08-10-2007, 01:37 AM
 
Location: A suburb of Vancouver, BC, Canada
172 posts, read 553,289 times
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Originally Posted by Botev1912 View Post
I don't agree that (because Phoenix it's closer to the equator). In Seattle the sun is very strong too
I disagree with you on that. I live in the Vancouver area and the sun is NOWHERE near as strong and the UV's are NEVER as high as the SW. I find that the UV up here hits 8 or 9 at the peak of day, where as down in the SW (at least in Palm Springs where I go very frequently) the UV's get up to 11 or 12 quite often in the summer. So no, I think that here in the PacNW coastal areas the sun does NOT feel anywhere near as strong as down in the desert southwest. You may think that it feels strong, but it is nothing compared to down there. Valley Native, I would agree and disagree. I have never lived in the SW (though like I said before I visit Palm Springs frequently), so I wouldn't know about living in that heat day in and day out for 3 or 4 months a year. However, I found the North East (Toronto area) to be more uncomfortable on the days it was muggy outside, even if it were above 85F. However, it is not ALWAYS like that.....unlike the Gulf States.....that would be the ultimate hell.
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Old 08-10-2007, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Botev1912 View Post
I don't agree that (because Phoenix it's closer to the equator). In Seattle the sun is very strong too
Uh, I take it youve never been to Phoenix? Yeah, the sun there about 3 times as intense as Seattle's. It feels like youre standing next to a heat lamp. Literally. A good word to describe it would be "searing".
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