U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 09-03-2011, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Top of the South (Nelson), NZ
7,110 posts, read 3,462,665 times
Reputation: 2476

Advertisements

What is the main geographical influence on your local weather?. Here it is the mountains. They protect from westerly rain and southerly snow, but provide orographic lifting and therefore heavier rainfall from the north. There are frequent foehn effect winds, and morning katabatic winds. There is also a quite a lot of towering cummulus cloud throughout the colder months, which I think is due to the mountains.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-03-2011, 07:32 PM
 
Location: PA
18,836 posts, read 9,091,383 times
Reputation: 7872
The Appalachian Mountains in my area shield my city from much of the snow, cloudiness, and cold that cities like Pittsburgh, PA and Toronto get. It could be 40F/4C and sunny where I live and a 2 hour drive west of the range, Pittsburgh would be around 25F/-3C and completely cloudy. I could get an inch of snow and Pittsburgh would get 3 or more. I average 2619 hours of sunshine annually compared with 2023 hours for Pittsburgh. During the winter months of December and January (the dead middle of winter), I get 155 hours in January, and 127 in December and Pittsburgh gets 93 and 74, respectively. Putting it in perspective, my area is just barely as sunny as Adelaide, Australia and Adelaide is cloudier than York, PA in winter except for December/June where Adelaide gets 20 hours more.

During the summer, the Appalachians do nothing but just kinda sit on the land. The spring, fall and summertime moisture we get in my area is provided mostly by hot, steamy, wet air from the Gulf of Mexico. That would explain why even though I'm located 40N, I feel like I'm in Florida during the summer even this high up.

A little fun fact. My city's climatic twin is Beijing, minus the monsoon pattern rainfall. Precipitation here is evenly distributed throughout the year. My other climatic twin, except rainfall, is Madrid, Spain

Last edited by theunbrainwashed; 09-03-2011 at 07:48 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2011, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Top of the South (Nelson), NZ
7,110 posts, read 3,462,665 times
Reputation: 2476
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
The Appalachian Mountains in my area shield my city from much of the snow, cloudiness, and cold that cities like Pittsburgh, PA and Toronto get. It could be 40F/4C and sunny where I live and a 2 hour drive west of the range, Pittsburgh would be around 25F/-3C and completely cloudy. I could get an inch of snow and Pittsburgh would get 3 or more. I average 2619 hours of sunshine annually compared with 2023 hours for Pittsburgh. During the winter months of December and January (the dead middle of winter), I get 155 hours in January, and 127 in December and Pittsburgh gets 93 and 74, respectively. Putting it in perspective, my area is just barely as sunny as Adelaide, Australia and Adelaide is cloudier than York, PA in winter except for December/June where Adelaide gets 20 hours more.

During the summer, the Appalachians do nothing but just kinda sit on the land. The spring, fall and summertime moisture we get in my area is provided mostly by hot, steamy, wet air from the Gulf of Mexico. That would explain why even though I'm located 40N, I feel like I'm in Florida during the summer even this high up.

A little fun fact. My city's climatic twin is Beijing, minus the monsoon pattern rainfall. Precipitation here is evenly distributed throughout the year. My other climatic twin, except rainfall, is Madrid, Spain
It looks like an interesting climate. Is the summer rain mainly frontal system or convectional? Wouldn't you have colder winters than Madrid?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2011, 08:47 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
14,839 posts, read 8,620,440 times
Reputation: 5709
The Pennines mountain range probably have the biggest effect on our weather. Not only do they shield us from most of the rain from the west, making us one of the driest cities in the UK, but they also mean we do very well in terms of snow in winter when the winds switch to an easterly direction. A win win for me!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-03-2011, 09:02 PM
 
Location: PA
18,836 posts, read 9,091,383 times
Reputation: 7872
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
It looks like an interesting climate. Is the summer rain mainly frontal system or convectional? Wouldn't you have colder winters than Madrid?
We have both precipitation types here in the spring and summer. It can be very sunny in the morning and, depending on the humidity and dew point, can develop into a pop-up thunderstorm when no cold front or squall line is present. These storms are usually just pop-up super cells and we've gotten several of them in May and June and they can morph together and grow bigger. Our storms are also activated when a cold front passes through and the intensity of the rain and storm depends how strong the cold front is, of course. I've got it down into an art form and can predict with reasonable accuracy if there's gonna be a pop up in the afternoon or evening. If I look outside and the mountainside is shrouded in a fine "mist", it is an indicator that there's gonna be a thunderstorm developing even if there's no frontal system nearby.

Yeah, we're colder than Madrid, on average, by 10F. However, that's entirely dependent on how many and how often cold fronts pass through. It is not unusual for temps in my city to reach as high as 65F in December though that only happens at most for a few days.

But thanks for correcting me. Madrid is warmer in Spain but across the entire year, Madrid is only warmer by 4F/2C

Oh, I don't know if this happens over there in the UK, but here in PA, you can tell when a really bad storm is gonna happen if you see like a slight green haze in the air. It's hard to explain, but I'm sure other Americans on here probably know what I'm talking about. Does that happen in the UK too?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2011, 01:39 AM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
4,079 posts, read 3,001,428 times
Reputation: 1716
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
The Appalachian Mountains in my area shield my city from much of the snow, cloudiness, and cold that cities like Pittsburgh, PA and Toronto get. It could be 40F/4C and sunny where I live and a 2 hour drive west of the range, Pittsburgh would be around 25F/-3C and completely cloudy. I could get an inch of snow and Pittsburgh would get 3 or more. I average 2619 hours of sunshine annually compared with 2023 hours for Pittsburgh. During the winter months of December and January (the dead middle of winter), I get 155 hours in January, and 127 in December and Pittsburgh gets 93 and 74, respectively. Putting it in perspective, my area is just barely as sunny as Adelaide, Australia and Adelaide is cloudier than York, PA in winter except for December/June where Adelaide gets 20 hours more.

During the summer, the Appalachians do nothing but just kinda sit on the land. The spring, fall and summertime moisture we get in my area is provided mostly by hot, steamy, wet air from the Gulf of Mexico. That would explain why even though I'm located 40N, I feel like I'm in Florida during the summer even this high up.

A little fun fact. My city's climatic twin is Beijing, minus the monsoon pattern rainfall. Precipitation here is evenly distributed throughout the year. My other climatic twin, except rainfall, is Madrid, Spain
A check on the latest monthly averages for Adelaide Aero gives an average of 2800 hours, so you're not quite in that league yet. (Note: the total has to be calculated by multiplying the separate monthly hours per day values by month-length, and then adding theses totals - the annual hpd value quoted is a simple arithmetic average of the monthly ones and can err quite significantly).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2011, 01:49 AM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
4,079 posts, read 3,001,428 times
Reputation: 1716
NZ's Southern Alps have a very dramatic effect on rainfall. A station upwind of them has an annual average rainfall of 11,475mm - the highest number I have seen for anywhere poleward of 35 latitude - and there may well be places with up to 13000mm or more nearby. Just 60kms or so away on the other side of the divide at Tekapo, the average is 600mm.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2011, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Top of the South (Nelson), NZ
7,110 posts, read 3,462,665 times
Reputation: 2476
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
We have both precipitation types here in the spring and summer. It can be very sunny in the morning and, depending on the humidity and dew point, can develop into a pop-up thunderstorm when no cold front or squall line is present. These storms are usually just pop-up super cells and we've gotten several of them in May and June and they can morph together and grow bigger. Our storms are also activated when a cold front passes through and the intensity of the rain and storm depends how strong the cold front is, of course. I've got it down into an art form and can predict with reasonable accuracy if there's gonna be a pop up in the afternoon or evening. If I look outside and the mountainside is shrouded in a fine "mist", it is an indicator that there's gonna be a thunderstorm developing even if there's no frontal system nearby.

Yeah, we're colder than Madrid, on average, by 10F. However, that's entirely dependent on how many and how often cold fronts pass through. It is not unusual for temps in my city to reach as high as 65F in December though that only happens at most for a few days.

But thanks for correcting me. Madrid is warmer in Spain but across the entire year, Madrid is only warmer by 4F/2C

Oh, I don't know if this happens over there in the UK, but here in PA, you can tell when a really bad storm is gonna happen if you see like a slight green haze in the air. It's hard to explain, but I'm sure other Americans on here probably know what I'm talking about. Does that happen in the UK too?
No green haze here(NZ), but we don't get summer thunderstorms like you would get. Around here most of our thunderstorms are in the colder months. Probably only 2-3 thunder days a summer. About half the days of summer have the cloud buildup that look as though thunder is imminent, but there isn't enough heat to make it happen, they just turn into brief downpours in the mountains. Now that I think about it, during the this winters thunderstorms (which were protracted affairs), there was an unusual light quality on some days, more yellow than green though. There were whole days of thunder, with very heavy snowfall in the mountains, some of the most impressive weather I've seen.

York has an average temperature very close to here, with our average annual daily min/max temps at 7-18C/44-64F and York at 5-18C/41-64F. There is about 35% more rain here on 20 fewer days annually, but York gets about 160 more hours of sunshine a year. The biggest difference would be in the makeup of the temp stats with the difference here between warmest and coldest months at only 10C/20F, whereas York has a 25C/47F difference.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2011, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
4,979 posts, read 3,420,096 times
Reputation: 3107
I wish i knew why Buenos Aires gets to be so hot. I mean the latitude is 34, in the temperate range and stuff, but i recently learned that BA gets hotter in the hottest month (January) than its northern neighbours with similar weather. Rosario for instance, is a city located directly northern BA in Santa Fe province, also with humidity and similar geography, at 32 latitude, and i always thought "Rosario must be insanely hot in summer" and recently found out that average for summer while they are 20/30 c in BA, they are 18/29 in Rosario!! I know its kind of similar, but i wonder why this is, since Rosario should be hotter since they are both cities that have a river, are plain in altitude, have humid weather, and are really located in the same geography only that one is closer to the equator than the other, therefore, it should be hotter.

Cordoba, on the other hand, located in a different geography, but also northern, is a city much warmer in the winter in BA (Cordoba has amazing weather, warm all year), but its also a bit colder in the summer.
I wonder if the hot BA summer have to do with the 13 millon people that live here and the asphalt and stuff? all the people together maybe add 1 or 2 celsius?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2011, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Top of the South (Nelson), NZ
7,110 posts, read 3,462,665 times
Reputation: 2476
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
The Pennines mountain range probably have the biggest effect on our weather. Not only do they shield us from most of the rain from the west, making us one of the driest cities in the UK, but they also mean we do very well in terms of snow in winter when the winds switch to an easterly direction. A win win for me!
Do you get a noticeable foehn effect during westerly winds?
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top