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Old 09-10-2011, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Miami, FL
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Kiruna is at 68N...no **** the winters are longer. I think it's pretty sad that a place at 48N and a place at 68N are even being compared, compare Kiruna to a place like Arctic Village, AK, and tell me which place is colder (they're at the same latitude)
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Old 09-10-2011, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Miami, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaul View Post
I don't consider Scandinavia to be cold for its latitude. Furthermore, Scandinavia is geographically smaller than all the Upper-midwestern states combined, and it is also much warmer than anywhere in those states. Some people were making absurd comparisons between the winter temperatures in Arizona/ the Southern USA tropics and Scandinavia (at 60 latitude) to draw the conclusion that most of the USA is warmer than Scandinavia. Seriously, what mode of reasoning is this?
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Old 09-10-2011, 10:06 AM
 
Location: France
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I was just responding to Kaul's post about Northern Scandianan towns being nowhere as cold as northern Minnesota in the winter.
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Old 09-10-2011, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Miami, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rozenn View Post
I was just responding to Kaul's post about Northern Scandianan towns being nowhere as cold as northern Minnesota in the winter.
My apologies, I'm never posting while drunk again. lol
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Old 09-10-2011, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemycomputer90 View Post
I'm west of NYC and the average January temperature here is 24 F. Almost every winter, the suburbs of NYC fall at or below zero. Last winter dropped down to -11 F here.
Depends which suburbs. I lived in the suburbs of New York (40 miles to the east) and never saw a below zero reading in my lifetime. Also, many winters never see it go below 10F or so. Last winter it dropped to 4F, not -11F. Central Park only dropped to 6F, so perhaps that's an indication of the strength of the heat island.

The average January temperature is 30F, though.
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Old 09-10-2011, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
I know the Northern US can get very cold but so can much of Scandinavia away from the immediate coastline

Some record lows:

Copenhagen: -13F (-25C)
Oslo: -14.8F (-26C)
Stockholm: -25.6F (-32C)
Helsinki: -32.8F (-36C)
Uppsala: -39.1F (-39.5C)
Rovianemi: -53.5F (-47.5C)

I am certain that most major cities in the US aside from the upper midwest and parts of New England have higher record lows than that.
Record for Long Island (Islip) is -11F
for my town in Western Massachusetts is -30F
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Old 09-11-2011, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Most of the U.S. has Scandinavian winters, especially the states west of the Appalachian Mountains that frequently see winters at or below freezing for much of the season. The U.S. interior is very cold in winter and even the Southern states away from the coast have cold winters. Most of Europe seems to have around 0C winters, not including Russia of course. Have you ever been to Missouri? It's in the middle of the country right above the northern boundary of the "Sunbelt" and the winter I was there was -10C during the night or colder, and during the day it hovers around 0C. I think people have a misconception about Norway and Sweden being colder than they really are, just like foreigners have a misconception that the U.S. south is warmer than it actually is. Much of Sweden and Norway is as warm and cool as the U.S. northeast, not like Fairbanks or Yellowknife. For pretty much most of January, York (PA, not England) and Stockholm were both a bit under 0C. December here was mostly around 0C same like the southern 1/3 of Sweden.

I should specify that I meant to say central and western Europe. Eastern Europe can get quite cold in winter, however, my assessment that about 1/3 of the U.S. is at or below freezing during winter. Texas is not as warm as people think it is, neither are Arkansas, the upper halves of Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia. The only warm places in the U.S. is central and southern Texas, southern LA, MS, AL, and GA, most of CA, southern half of AZ and all these states except AZ and CA are subject to severe cold snaps during winter. The PNW has weather varying from cool Mediterranean to oceanic.
I have to say that Stocholm, Sweden does pretty darn well when it comes to winter low temps, given the latitude. However, the data does not fully corroborate what you are stating. Much of Sweden is not warmer than the NE USA. Forget about the NE USA, look at Rapid City, SD and Minneapolis. I assume you meant only in the winter, but even then parts of the Upper Midwest are warmer during the day (max temps). Of course the Midwest is much sunnier than Sweden too.

Rapid City avg max temps are higher than Stockholm in every month of the year. Minneapolis only has colder high temps in Dec, Jan, and Feb. Stockholm is lower in elevation and is coastal, so low temps are warmer (more maritime like the rest of Western Europe). Rapid City is at elevation 3,000ft, and Minneapolis is around 1,000ft. Stockholm is further north in latitude, but is located in southern Sweden and more representative of southern Scandanavia I would think.

In winter, the US temps fluctuate with the warm and cold fronts. Our average temps have higher std deviations than Scandanavia. So imagine Stockholm pretty much sticking with those winter temps.

The 24 hour average temp for the three coldest months is warmer in Stockholm by about ten degrees over Minneapolis, and three degrees over Rapid City. But you are right that during an extreme cold outbreak, much more of the US Midwest would be colder. Heck even parts of Texas would be colder. Sweden probably doesn't get the extremes, but they also don't get 20 or more days over 50F in winter like Rapid City does. Record lows in the more central Midwest are colder than Stockholm, but average winter temps are higher in St. Louis than Stockholm.

Stockholm went down to -13F in 1987. My city has never reached that low temp. I really don't think NE USA winters are colder than Sweden, and certainly the Mid-Atlantic is warmer than Stockholm in winter.
Kiruna in northern Sweden has Jan averages of 14F/-2F, colder than Minneapolis on average.

I would venture to say that the northern and interior areas of Scandanavia are colder on average than most it not all of the Midwest in winter.













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Old 09-11-2011, 02:07 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Most of Scandinavia is definitely colder than the American midwest in winter.

Only southern coastal areas of Sweden and the west coast of Norway are warmer.

Kiruna in northern Sweden is crazy cold and winters long.


Oulu, Finland



Though I think it is fair to say Scandinavia is very mild for its latitude.
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Old 09-11-2011, 02:27 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I have to say that Stocholm, Sweden does pretty darn well when it comes to winter low temps, given the latitude. However, the data does not fully corroborate what you are stating. Much of Sweden is not warmer than the NE USA. Forget about the NE USA, look at Rapid City, SD and Minneapolis. I assume you meant only in the winter, but even then parts of the Upper Midwest are warmer during the day (max temps). Of course the Midwest is much sunnier than Sweden too.

Rapid City avg max temps are higher than Stockholm in every month of the year. Minneapolis only has colder high temps in Dec, Jan, and Feb. Stockholm is lower in elevation and is coastal, so low temps are warmer (more maritime like the rest of Western Europe). Rapid City is at elevation 3,000ft, and Minneapolis is around 1,000ft. Stockholm is further north in latitude, but is located in southern Sweden and more representative of southern Scandanavia I would think.

In winter, the US temps fluctuate with the warm and cold fronts. Our average temps have higher std deviations than Scandanavia. So imagine Stockholm pretty much sticking with those winter temps.

The 24 hour average temp for the three coldest months is warmer in Stockholm by about ten degrees over Minneapolis, and three degrees over Rapid City. But you are right that during an extreme cold outbreak, much more of the US Midwest would be colder. Heck even parts of Texas would be colder. Sweden probably doesn't get the extremes, but they also don't get 20 or more days over 50F in winter like Rapid City does. Record lows in the more central Midwest are colder than Stockholm, but average winter temps are higher in St. Louis than Stockholm.

Stockholm went down to -13F in 1987. My city has never reached that low temp. I really don't think NE USA winters are colder than Sweden, and certainly the Mid-Atlantic is warmer than Stockholm in winter.
Kiruna in northern Sweden has Jan averages of 14F/-2F, colder than Minneapolis on average.

I would venture to say that the northern and interior areas of Scandanavia are colder on average than most it not all of the Midwest in winter.
Heck, Stockholm got to -13F last winter too, or something similar.

In Stockholm the average high is -0.7C in January and those temperatures are fairly constant and don't fluctuate much if at all, so its snow cover is usually there from mid December onwards, except in very mild winters like 2008.
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Old 09-24-2011, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
28,013 posts, read 14,255,756 times
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Some good news on the drought in Texas:

First the really good news: according to the latest US Drought Monitor, only 0.83% of Texas is in moderate drought.

Next the moderately good news: only 2.42% of Texas is in severe drought.

Texas Drought: Good News and Bad News | Climate Abyss | a Chron.com blog
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