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Old 10-18-2011, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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This map places Edmonton in the E zone. But Edmonton has 5 months above 50°F and doesn't look it should be near the boundary at all.
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Old 10-18-2011, 08:25 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
This map places Edmonton in the E zone. But Edmonton has 5 months above 50°F and doesn't look it should be near the boundary at all.
One of the funny things about this map...is if you look closely you’ll notice what looks like a "tongue" stretching down toward the general vicinity of Edmonton (find the 113 W and 53 N intersect). My guess (and only a guess - ?), is that there is a huge data void in much of interior Western Canada (like much of Canada). So they extrapolated using the only station they had (Edmonton).
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Old 10-18-2011, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wavehunter007 View Post
One of the funny things about this map...is if you look closely you’ll notice what looks like a "tongue" stretching down toward the general vicinity of Edmonton (find the 113 W and 53 N intersect). My guess (and only a guess - ?), is that there is a huge data void in much of interior Western Canada (like much of Canada). So they extrapolated using the only station they had (Edmonton).
There are plenty of weather stations in Western Canada. Almost every main town has one.

Weather - Environment Canada

Perhaps some of the lines on the map are wrong...
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Old 10-19-2011, 09:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaul View Post
From the map you posted, Juneau falls right into the green Do zone.
Ya technically Juneau is a borderline maritime climate just like the rest of SE Alaska and British Columbia, and Washington coast.

That being said it does not matter because it is only a narrow sliver of land that goes one or two miles inland before it hits high mountains. The map posted above does not do it justice because within a few miles inland the mountains rise pretty sharply and the climate transitions into a much colder alpine climate.

For those on the east coast who have never visited SE Alaska it is harder to appreciate how rapidly the climate changes on the Northwest coast of North America. In the middle of April You can literally go from 7 degrees Celsius (45 degrees) and raining to -4 C (25 degrees) with 10 feet of snow on the ground within a few miles from the coast line.
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Old 10-20-2011, 02:57 AM
 
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Subartic climates suck...I already find Brussels (belgium) greyer wetter and colder at 50°30' North Latitude than my home city Paris at 49°, so I imagine places at 60° Lat locations! (shiver)
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Old 01-29-2016, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Carlton North, Victoria, Australia
98 posts, read 56,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wavehunter007 View Post
That's why lines drawn on a climate map should (I think) only be used as a rough guide and not a hard line in the sand.
Subpolar maritime climates are, I have felt for some time, the biggest problem with Koppen’s climate scheme.

Many extremly humid maritime climates in the Kuril Islands, parts of Kamchatka, southern Alaska, and parts of Quebec and Newfoundland are classed as “subarctic” because the coldest month is under -3 degrees Celsius or 26.6 degrees Fahrenheit. In my view these climates have much more in common ecologically and meteorologically with the “subpolar oceanic climates” of northwestern Europe, the Aleutians and southern Chile:
  1. Very heavy precipitation eapecially in winter when classic “subarctic” climates are dry and allow extremely deep soil freezing
  2. dominance by oceanic cold-core lows rather the continental plateau cold-core anticyclones (in fact this dominance can be more constant in colder east coast subarctic climates than on west coasts)
  3. absence of permafrost due to extreme snow cover and mildness, whereas “subarctic” taiga climates most typically have discontinuous or, in Asia, continuous permafrost
  4. much heavier Quaternary glaciation (more snow and cooler summers)
  5. highly maritime fishing-based economies rather than hunting or reindeer herding
  6. vegetation much lower and softer-leaved than taiga
As I see it, the real division in subpolar and polar climates is between maritime climates and continental ones, and that this can be defined best in terms of mean annual temperature – a maritime subpolar climate having an annual mean at or above 0° Celsius or 32° Fahrenheit and a continental one having it's annual mean below this but with at least one month above 10°C or 50°F.

Living as I do in the hot, ancient land of Australia, these places fascinate me like few others; nonetheless I have no liking for humid subpolar oceanic climates despite avowedly hating hot weather and loving cool summers. The winters are just too gloomy and snowy, as I can testify from a short stay during the 2009/2010 winter in Helsinki (not quite subarctic but still quite strongly influenced by the Atlantic): it was so dark, cold and grey on two of the three days there I could nor rate the climate highly.

Last edited by mianfei; 01-29-2016 at 11:32 PM.. Reason: Additional difference
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Old 01-30-2016, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Finland, European Union
19,579 posts, read 11,397,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mianfei View Post
The winters are just too gloomy and snowy, as I can testify from a short stay during the 2009/2010 winter in Helsinki (not quite subarctic but still quite strongly influenced by the Atlantic): it was so dark, cold and grey on two of the three days there I could nor rate the climate highly.
I doubt many appreciates gloomy, dark and grey days in the darkest part of the winter.

Helsinki is quite continental, not either subarctic or subpolar oceanic.
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Old 01-30-2016, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Austin
3,075 posts, read 805,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
Schefferville, Quebec has the amazing combo of being bitterly cold and also being as gloomy/wet as maritime subarctic climates.
Pretty great climate. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schefferville#Climate

A similar one is Ambler, Alaska: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambler,_Alaska#Climate

Some others which are somewhat dryer but still quite wet compared to most other subarctic climates:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magadan#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inukjuak#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church...nitoba#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iqaluit#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuzhno...hy_and_climate (almost Dfc)
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Old 01-30-2016, 10:56 AM
 
Location: SE Alaska
1,537 posts, read 529,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMarbles View Post
Frequent rain makes it nearly impossible to enjoy outdoors in with any consistency. .
Not in my experience. It means you can be very active outside without getting hot or sunburned.

Many of the rainy days are light precipitation, which is easy to dress for.

Air conditioning, which I hate, is unnecessary at all times in homes, buildings and cars.

Having cloud cover more often than not is better than usually sunny, IMO.

Occasionally it can get a bit extreme, but it's a preferable extreme than one sunny day after another is.

As previously mentioned, Juneau and all of SE Alaska does not have a subarctic climate.
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Old 01-30-2016, 05:15 PM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
3,149 posts, read 1,710,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
This map places Edmonton in the E zone. But Edmonton has 5 months above 50°F and doesn't look it should be near the boundary at all.
Agree, not a very accurate map at all.


It just "roughly" shows the various climatic zones, imo very roughly,
all the zones.


Edmonton shouldn't be in the E zone, same with "Peace River" area NW of Edmonton,
centered around Grande Prairie.
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