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View Poll Results: Christchurch
A 7 12.73%
B 16 29.09%
C 14 25.45%
D 12 21.82%
F 6 10.91%
Voters: 55. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-28-2011, 10:17 PM
 
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A- . Nice mild summers and non-frigid winters. Just noticed I'm the first A
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Old 10-28-2011, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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B- for mildness.
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Old 10-28-2011, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,338 posts, read 5,535,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
How can you compare Christchurch to arctic and subarctic climates when they can grow Canary Island Date Palms, Norfolk Island Pine and Jacaranda...
Try growing those unprotected long term in places like Oklahoma City or Atlanta.

Site Limitations Of Trees - Christchurch City Council (http://www1.ccc.govt.nz/Planning/SiteLimitsOfTrees.asp - broken link)
Hmm... I get your point about the subtropical/tropical plants, but a lot of the trees on the list seem to be familiar Northern Hemisphere temperate zone trees.

I haven't been to NZ but it does seems odd for me to imagine something as "northerly" as a birch, which is native up to the subarctic verging on arctic regions, growing together/alongside a tree that can be native to the subtropics, verging on the true tropics, like a Jacaranda.
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Old 10-29-2011, 12:39 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
9,669 posts, read 10,970,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
Hmm... I get your point about the subtropical/tropical plants, but a lot of the trees on the list seem to be familiar Northern Hemisphere temperate zone trees.

I haven't been to NZ but it does seems odd for me to imagine something as "northerly" as a birch, which is native up to the subarctic verging on arctic regions, growing together/alongside a tree that can be native to the subtropics, verging on the true tropics, like a Jacaranda.
Yes.. many oceanic climates have this feature especially the lower latitude ones like Christchurch.. they can support virtually any cold-temperate zone tree like birches, maples etc. as well as most warm-temperate zone trees and even a few subtropical species....

Here in Vancouver it's not uncommon to see a windmill palm planted next to a maple tree... it makes for an interesting contrast this time of year
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Old 10-29-2011, 02:12 AM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
5,599 posts, read 7,817,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChesterNZ View Post

A similar temp was reached in Jan 2009, although I wasn't here for that:

Date(NZST) Tair(C) Tdew(C) 20090108:0000 23 9.8 20090108:0100 23 10.1 20090108:0200 21.4 10.2 20090108:0300 20 11.8 20090108:0400 19 10.8 20090108:0500 19.3 11.1 20090108:0600 19 12.3 20090108:0700 25 9.3 20090108:0800 26.6 10.7 20090108:0900 30 8.4 20090108:1000 32 8.9 20090108:1100 32.6 9.4 20090108:1200 33 9.1 20090108:1300 34 7.1 20090108:1400 35 6.3 20090108:1500 32 7 20090108:1600 32 8.9 20090108:1700 30.8 8.5 20090108:1800 30 7.8 20090108:1900 28 9.8 20090108:2000 27.6 8 20090108:2100 25 7.2 20090108:2200 24 5.9 20090108:2300 25.7 5.3 20090109:0000 22 6.7 20090109:0100 22 9.9 20090109:0200 19.6 9.5 20090109:0300 19 9.2 20090109:0400 19 10.3 20090109:0500 19.4 9.6 20090109:0600 21 8.3 20090109:0700 21 10.2 20090109:0800 20.4 10.5 20090109:0900 22 10.2

I was so disappointed that I missed the 2009 event (which at the time saw the 3rd highest high temp since records began in the 1860s -- to be pushed into fourth place this year) and I thought I might never see such weather in ChCh again. You can imagine my jubilation when we not only exceeded 2009's temp this year but also got hotter earlier and stayed hot longer than in '73. It was truly one of the greatest days of my life.

How does this compare with London heat waves like the 38 C in Aug '03?
I wasn't in London for the 10th August 03 heatwave, but I was in central France until the night of the 8th, and from I think the 2nd onwards it was if the normal, changeable 25-27C weather had just switched off and furnace-like 38-40C highs, lows not much below 25C and no winds/cloud got immediately switched on - we don't get abrupt changes to hot weather like that this side of the Channel. It had been dry for the previous few months and we'd had quite a few unusually hot spells already that summer. On the 9th back home in Yorkshire I remember it being just under 30C and humid, yet still sunny - probably the hottest-feeling day we'd had since the 1990 heatwave. On the 10th it broke down with a slow-moving front from the north and about 10am the skies got so dark I needed the lights on just to read a newspaper as I would on an overcast day in mid-winter, and we had thunder and bouts of heavy rain and a high of about 24C - it seemed to do nothing to freshen the air though, as I remember the next night being too sticky to sleep.

There's an old saying that the English summer consists of three fine days and a thunderstorm, but the SE almost always gets the hot weather first and holds onto it for longer (and the near continent even more so). Cooldowns are never as drastic as yours, though twice this year we had one day 10C cooler than the day before. The temps here (in the coolest part of London, perhaps representative of the SE as a whole more than the heat island of London) during that spell (average is around 23/14):
2/8: 24.9/11.7
3/8: 29.0/12.8
4/8: 30.3/15.6
5/8: 30.0/17.2
6/8: 35.2/19.8
7/8: 29.8/17.0
8/8: 30.0/17.1
9/8: 35.1/18.2
10/8: 37.4/21.4
11/8: 33.5/18.2
12/8: 30.7/17.1
13/8: 28.4/17.2
14/8: 25.0/13.8

Oddly, there was no thundery breakdown to end that spell here, it just seems to have fizzled out. It had the hottest individual temperature, but it wasn't the longest heatwave - in 1976 somewhere in southern England got to 32C or above on 15 consecutive days, and Heathrow got to 31C or above on 14 consecutive days.
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Old 10-29-2011, 03:51 AM
 
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
2,688 posts, read 3,754,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ben86 View Post
I wasn't in London for the 10th August 03 heatwave, but I was in central France until the night of the 8th, and from I think the 2nd onwards it was if the normal, changeable 25-27C weather had just switched off and furnace-like 38-40C highs, lows not much below 25C and no winds/cloud got immediately switched on - we don't get abrupt changes to hot weather like that this side of the Channel. It had been dry for the previous few months and we'd had quite a few unusually hot spells already that summer. On the 9th back home in Yorkshire I remember it being just under 30C and humid, yet still sunny - probably the hottest-feeling day we'd had since the 1990 heatwave. On the 10th it broke down with a slow-moving front from the north and about 10am the skies got so dark I needed the lights on just to read a newspaper as I would on an overcast day in mid-winter, and we had thunder and bouts of heavy rain and a high of about 24C - it seemed to do nothing to freshen the air though, as I remember the next night being too sticky to sleep.

There's an old saying that the English summer consists of three fine days and a thunderstorm, but the SE almost always gets the hot weather first and holds onto it for longer (and the near continent even more so). Cooldowns are never as drastic as yours, though twice this year we had one day 10C cooler than the day before. The temps here (in the coolest part of London, perhaps representative of the SE as a whole more than the heat island of London) during that spell (average is around 23/14):
2/8: 24.9/11.7
3/8: 29.0/12.8
4/8: 30.3/15.6
5/8: 30.0/17.2
6/8: 35.2/19.8
7/8: 29.8/17.0
8/8: 30.0/17.1
9/8: 35.1/18.2
10/8: 37.4/21.4
11/8: 33.5/18.2
12/8: 30.7/17.1
13/8: 28.4/17.2
14/8: 25.0/13.8

Oddly, there was no thundery breakdown to end that spell here, it just seems to have fizzled out. It had the hottest individual temperature, but it wasn't the longest heatwave - in 1976 somewhere in southern England got to 32C or above on 15 consecutive days, and Heathrow got to 31C or above on 14 consecutive days.
Hmm... it would seem that the climates of Christchurch and London / Paris are less similar than I thought. In particular, thunderstorms virtually never occur here. We don't really get heatwaves as such, either -- our hot weather tends to occur on a single day (two or three days tops).

It's interesting to note that 15 consecutive 32+ C days is far more than have been seen in much warmer climates like Sydney or Brisbane (I suspect). It's pretty impressive that this can happen in an Oceanic climate in the 50s latitude.
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Old 10-29-2011, 03:55 AM
 
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RWood View Post
That's a ridiculous statement, period.
Remember, this is the same guy who labelled Houston "subarctic".

I can understand, though -- Christchurch offers virtually nothing for someone whose preferred climate is a tropical rainforest.
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Old 10-29-2011, 04:11 AM
 
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
2,688 posts, read 3,754,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
A- . Nice mild summers and non-frigid winters. Just noticed I'm the first A
LOL, it's interesting to see what people here think of my climate. It seems to have been one of the most "neutral" in terms of ratings -- no one really seems to either love it or hate it. The average rating so far is pretty much bang on 'C'.
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Old 10-29-2011, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Katy, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChesterNZ View Post
Remember, this is the same guy who labelled Houston "subarctic".
Only from Nov-Feb, turns into a hot hell from June-August
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Old 10-29-2011, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Yorkshire, England
5,599 posts, read 7,817,185 times
Reputation: 3042
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChesterNZ View Post
Hmm... it would seem that the climates of Christchurch and London / Paris are less similar than I thought. In particular, thunderstorms virtually never occur here. We don't really get heatwaves as such, either -- our hot weather tends to occur on a single day (two or three days tops).

It's interesting to note that 15 consecutive 32+ C days is far more than have been seen in much warmer climates like Sydney or Brisbane (I suspect). It's pretty impressive that this can happen in an Oceanic climate in the 50s latitude.
Where do your short bursts of intense heat actually come from? I gather the interior of Australia gets 40C regularly, but for that to travel 1000 miles over a lukewarm sea must take most of the sting out of it, right? If the foehn effect has a major impact what sort of temperatures would you be getting in the same setup without it, i.e. if NZ was flat? We're always cooler than the near continent in summer heatwaves (and milder in winter cold snaps) and it's only 23 miles between England and France at the narrowest point.
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