U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-19-2012, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
5,025 posts, read 6,462,937 times
Reputation: 2425

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
I know the PNW gets more sunshine, but they also get more overcast days. We at least get days with a few hours of sun rather than 20 days in a row with nothing. The longest I've gone without seeing the sun is about 5 days.
I'll see evidence of "20 days in a row with nothing" first before accepting it, which sounds like typical hyperbole this column is focusing on. Seattle sites average about 65% in the sunniest month, blowing London out of the water in that respect.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-19-2012, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
5,025 posts, read 6,462,937 times
Reputation: 2425
Quote:
Originally Posted by Facepalm17 View Post
I'm not sure if international sunshine comparisons are all that valid, since it may be measured differently. For example, the US statistics tend to be higher than the Canadian statistics. Check out the sunshine differences between Sault Ste. Marie, MI and Sault Ste. Marie, ON:

Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There's a ~300 hour difference.

Windsor (Windsor, Ontario - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) and Detroit (Detroit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia), nearly 200 hours difference.
I agree there are problems, but in some comparisons Seattle is at least 400-500 hours ahead of London, and that's too much to explain away in that fashion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, Canada
1,255 posts, read 2,040,474 times
Reputation: 786
Quote:
Originally Posted by RWood View Post
I agree there are problems, but in some comparisons Seattle is at least 400-500 hours ahead of London, and that's too much to explain away in that fashion.
Also, though Canada's sunshine stats seem skewed unnaturally low versus its American neighbours... and Vancouver is still considerably sunnier than London.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,227 posts, read 9,992,126 times
Reputation: 5326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
Hmm... those are interesting "climate stereotypes".

I'm guessing the perception of Mexico with deserts and cacti is because people think of the area around the American border. Then again, there should be a decent amount of people in North America familiar with tropical resort places like Cancun and Acapulco, right? There's gotta be at least some who picture a rainforesty climate too, with ruins in the jungle when it comes to Mexico, due to the Mayans. Perhaps more people take the northernmost borders as more "typical" than the southernmost ones?

When it comes to South America being hot and humid, that's probably people thinking of the Amazon rainforest first, isn't it? I'm sure most people have some time in their life heard of the mountains of the Andes, or that there is a desert region (the Atacama), or perhaps the pampas and Patagonia -- I mean even if they know at least one of these non-rainforesty regions that exists, I guess the Amazon looms largest in the mind, probably because it's the biggest rainforest?

When it comes to thinking much of Canada has snow in summer etc. I think maybe some people more broadly have the mistaken idea of hearing a "colder" or "warmer" climate as meaning consistently that way throughout, and forget about how warmth or cold varies by seasonality more generally. They might think cold winter goes with cool summer -- that hot summer automatically goes with warm winter too. For example, I've known people misled by "Vancouver/the PNW is warmer than the rest of Canada/the Northeast/Midwest US" or "Europe is warmer due to the Gulf stream than North America" to mean those places are warmer year round, not just in winter!

When it comes to China, I notice climate seems like something that is rarely discussed/brought up about it and most people don't really have any particular strong notion of it as either a hot or cold country.

When it comes to New Zealand. That's one that got me the most out of this list. I really thought New Zealand was subtropical to tropical at first growing up. In Canadian cities, I saw tourism ads for NZ that makes you think so, exoticizing it, and especially in northern hemisphere winter, portraying it as a place to escape to "warmth". Due to the stereotypes, it actually shocked me that it's summers were more like Vancouver than Rio de Jaineiro.




Ouch, that must have been a big shock!

Interesting. I think people in Europe that aren't into climate or weather have misconceptions about N. America because they assume hot summer means mild winter. The early colonists tried to plant citrus in Virginia because they arrived during the warm season and assumed since it was much warmer than England, it had to have a very warm winter. They were way off the mark.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, Canada
1,255 posts, read 2,040,474 times
Reputation: 786
Here in Cairo many are surprised that northern countries can get similar temperatures in summer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,369 posts, read 26,573,898 times
Reputation: 8363
People who come to where I live in January or July find it very hard to believe that the "other" (extreme opposite) season actually exists as we describe it.

Then we point to the near-ubiquitous backyard swimming pools which happen to be completely filled with snow at the moment!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
830 posts, read 1,995,554 times
Reputation: 544
Very interesting thread. One that hasn't been mentioned as fas as I know, is the case of Turkey. I'd always thought that it had a climate similar to here, with hot summers and mild winters (well, it is so on most of its coast), but when I found out what winter was like in Ankara, and in Eskisehir, Konya, Kayseri... these are major cities, and they all have snow in the winter every year.

The one about NZ being tropical is funny. I never thought that. On the contrary, just by looking at globe and seeing its latitude, I thought it must be cool. But I have met people who had that misconception. I didn't understand how the could think a place that far from the equator could be tropical!

Another misconception, especially from Northern Hemisphere residents (some of them, of course, those who are not into climate and weather), they don't really know where the Northern Hemisphere ends and where the Southern Hemisphere begins. Some think that India is in the Southern Hemisphere! Basically, they associate NH with cold or temperate and SH with warm and hot or tropical... it's like an extended version of the Northern Hemisphere...

Also, some NH residents are not that aware of the reversed seasons in the SH... Once I read about a British girl who wanted to travel to South America and decided to come to BA... and she thought "I want to be in warm weather, so I'll go there in the summer"... and so she came in July, dressed "summer-like" she stepped out from the airplane and was very disappointed of course... and only then she found out about the reversed seasons. This is an extreme case, of course, haha.

Personally, before becoming a 'weather-geek', I didn't know how harsh winters were in North America. Because I've always been a 'latitude-conscious' person, I though that places in the Great Plains should have the same climate as the plains of the Pampas... so it never occured to me that it snowed in Kansas City or Saint Louis, or Oklahoma City, that was nuts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
5,901 posts, read 8,200,098 times
Reputation: 4360
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanfel View Post
Very interesting thread. One that hasn't been mentioned as fas as I know, is the case of Turkey. I'd always thought that it had a climate similar to here, with hot summers and mild winters (well, it is so on most of its coast), but when I found out what winter was like in Ankara, and in Eskisehir, Konya, Kayseri... these are major cities, and they all have snow in the winter every year.

The one about NZ being tropical is funny. I never thought that. On the contrary, just by looking at globe and seeing its latitude, I thought it must be cool. But I have met people who had that misconception. I didn't understand how the could think a place that far from the equator could be tropical!

Another misconception, especially from Northern Hemisphere residents (some of them, of course, those who are not into climate and weather), they don't really know where the Northern Hemisphere ends and where the Southern Hemisphere begins. Some think that India is in the Southern Hemisphere! Basically, they associate NH with cold or temperate and SH with warm and hot or tropical... it's like an extended version of the Northern Hemisphere...

Also, some NH residents are not that aware of the reversed seasons in the SH... Once I read about a British girl who wanted to travel to South America and decided to come to BA... and she thought "I want to be in warm weather, so I'll go there in the summer"... and so she came in July, dressed "summer-like" she stepped out from the airplane and was very disappointed of course... and only then she found out about the reversed seasons. This is an extreme case, of course, haha.

Personally, before becoming a 'weather-geek', I didn't know how harsh winters were in North America. Because I've always been a 'latitude-conscious' person, I though that places in the Great Plains should have the same climate as the plains of the Pampas... so it never occured to me that it snowed in Kansas City or Saint Louis, or Oklahoma City, that was nuts.

LOL to that! i imagine the girl thinking she was going to a southamerica hot summer and stepping into cold BA winter!! I never knew people could be SO ignortant, lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 06:24 PM
 
Location: New York City
2,789 posts, read 5,205,246 times
Reputation: 1807
Most people poorly understand Russia's climate. Russia is a huge country with a fairly diverse climate. Some parts of it are brutally cold but other places are not much colder than NYC or Chicago. In fact, you can even find palm trees on the Black Sea coast.

Most people associate Russia with Siberia but about 78% of Russians live in the European part of the country, which is considerably milder. In Moscow and St. Petersburg, the two biggest cities in Russia, winters are milder than in Ottawa or Montreal. Also most of Russia has fairly warm summers.

Russia is cold to be sure but sometimes people think it is colder than it really is mainly by associating it with Siberia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 06:25 PM
 
641 posts, read 808,936 times
Reputation: 512
Quote:
Originally Posted by Facepalm17 View Post
I'm not sure if international sunshine comparisons are all that valid, since it may be measured differently. For example, the US statistics tend to be higher than the Canadian statistics. Check out the sunshine differences between Sault Ste. Marie, MI and Sault Ste. Marie, ON:

Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There's a ~300 hour difference.

Windsor (Windsor, Ontario - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) and Detroit (Detroit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia), nearly 200 hours difference.
NOAA busted!!!

Sault Ste Marie, Ontario and Sault Ste Marie, Michigan are next to eachother

Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Ontario are next to each other!!

They should have almost indentical sunshine hours!

This proves that when comparing Canadian city sunshine hours
with US city sunshine hours, you need to add about 300 hours to
the Canadian city totals!

I read comments on this forum like "Canadian city X is not bad but I have to go with US city X because of higher sunshine hours" , yeah your comparing apples and oranges, Canadian sunshine hours are under reported!

Not sure but maybe other parts of the world are under reported too.

Moral of the story, using USA sunshine hours to compare one US city
with another US city is fine but comparing other countries could be inaccurate
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top