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Old 02-03-2012, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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According to the first map, BA is subtropical
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Old 02-03-2012, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Top of the South (Nelson), NZ
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Cool, it's subtropical here.
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Old 02-03-2012, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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lol, i know, doesnt make much sense when NZ is subtropical, right? with those cool summers
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Old 02-03-2012, 07:21 PM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMarbles View Post
So, we've talked at length about the Koppen climate classification but actually there is another, much lesser known classification developed my a Russian (Soviet) geographer and climatologist Boris. P. Alisov during the 1930s. This classification was used primarily by scientists in the Soviet Union and other countries within the Soviet block. I thought it might be of interest to take a quick look at it.



The classification consists mainly of 7 broad bands which are as follows:
Red - equatorial
Orange - sub-equatorial
Yellow - tropical
Bright green (lime) - subtropical
Darkish green - temperate
Blue - subarctic/subantarctic
Grey - arctic/antarctic

While not visible on the above map, the bands were further subdivided longitudinally. For example, the western part of a temperate band on a continent is classified as "temperate oceanic". Immediately to the east of it is a "mild-continental climate" followed by "strongly continental" and then "temperate monsoon". The subtropical zone follows a similar pattern, the Mediterranean climate all the way in the west to a monsoon climate on the eastern edge of continents.


Some peculiarities:
  • The tropics band includes a lot of deserts. There is no tropical band in East Asia
  • The temperate band stretches very far north, above the arctic circle in some places
  • The boundary between the temperate and the subtropical zone in North America passes very close to NYC
It looks a "little" like Koppen's theme.

I did see that the subtropical line passes close to NYC again. So again, just like the Koppen system, should we really put Orlando and Denver in the same climate zone. The map above seems to do just that. Look at Europe/Asia - the French Riveria and Moscow appear to be in the same climate zone.

I know I have said it too much - but you will not find a better climate classification system than Trewartha.
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Old 02-03-2012, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Top of the South (Nelson), NZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
lol, i know, doesnt make much sense when NZ is subtropical, right? with those cool summers
I never thought of NZ ( apart from a tiny portion) as subtropical,but as this criteria is - being under the influence of tropical weather fronts during the summer, and temperate/ polar fronts during the winter, it applies to about half of NZ. Our most significant weather (eg the warm front that dropped nearly 800mm in 3 days just before christmas) during summer and into early winter, is from the tropical Pacific, it's just highly moderated, hence the maritime label. Further south cold fronts are more frequent during summer, but usually have little impact here. Our rubbish weather typically comes from the north during summer, whereas Christchurch and places south get more of their rubbish weather from the south. The map and definition reflects this tendency well.

I think this fellow Alisov identified this important "genetic" point well. 3 cheers for Boris.

How does MDP fare under that definition? What weather pattern predominates in summer?
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Old 02-03-2012, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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Vancouver is firmly placed in the temperate zone where it should be but I find it peculiar that the subtropical/temperate line veers quite far north into the pacific west of Vancouver Island
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Old 02-03-2012, 09:57 PM
 
Location: New York City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
What's the deal with tropical vs. subequatorial?
I believe it has to do with precipitation patterns and the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone. Equatorial climate is wet year-round while sub-equatorial has wet and dry seasons.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I don't think temperate monsoon makes much sense for eastern North America (at least north of Georgia or so), the monsoon is more of an East Asian thing.
I think this classification was made primarily with Eurasia in mind (as was Koppen's). But of course things will not be symmetrical.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
so according to that last map Buenos Aires haves tropical weather?
i dont think so.

Weirdest thing is Mar del Plata with its cool summers and cold winter will be considered tropical, too, lol.

And the second map is different from the first one?
BA is subtropical according to both maps. The maps are the same but the color coding is different. On the second map (the more detailed one) subtropical is colored yellow.
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Old 02-03-2012, 10:01 PM
 
Location: New York City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
That's really interesting. What are the categories based on? It's kind of hard to imagine a category that includes Chicago and the Aleutian islands, Scotland and Siberia.
It is based on circulation patterns and the movements of fronts and air masses. It is not meant to portray has Scotland having the same climate as Siberia, just that they are in the same broad temperate zone. Each zone if further subdivided based on continentality, precipitation patterns and so on.
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Old 02-04-2012, 12:28 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
How does MDP fare under that definition? What weather pattern predominates in summer?
I think MDP would be similar to NZ summers? According to koppen, MDP is:

The weather pattern for the region is that of an oceanic climate (Cfb, according to the Köppen climate classification), with humid and moderate summers and relatively cool winters, although polar air masses from Antarctica are frequent.

I agree with this definition, and i dont see MDP being in a similar subtropical zone as BA. BA and MDP summers are as different as it gets, while in MDP nights are between 14 and 17 celsius, in BA nights are around 23 and 27 celsius, and lower temps in BA occur at morning, while in MDP cold nights are common in the summer. Basically, in BA the temp at night doesnt low down at all (like today, 30 celsius at 10pm, this is normal here) while in MDP after the sun goes down, the temp drops like a lot. Anyways, i dont think this two cities should both be considered subtropical, BA should, MDP should not with their 14/26 c in hottest month, fits better in a temperate oceanic weather than in a subtropical one.
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Old 02-04-2012, 12:29 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrMarbles View Post
I
BA is subtropical according to both maps. The maps are the same but the color coding is different. On the second map (the more detailed one) subtropical is colored yellow.
oh, sorry mr marbles, didnt notice that
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