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Old 03-12-2012, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Anywhere without a significant number of naturally occurring trees would be considered arid to me, in Western Australia anywhere north of Geraldton and east of Southern Cross starts looking rather arid to my eyes. The vegetation around the Perth area is rather scrubby as well which is in part due to the extremely sandy and alkaline soils of the coastal plain. Areas inland with equivalent rainfall look a lot more forested.
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Old 03-12-2012, 08:40 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sulkiercupid View Post
Anywhere without a significant number of naturally occurring trees would be considered arid to me, in Western Australia anywhere north of Geraldton and east of Southern Cross starts looking rather arid to my eyes. The vegetation around the Perth area is rather scrubby as well which is in part due to the extremely sandy and alkaline soils of the coastal plain. Areas inland with equivalent rainfall look a lot more forested.
The Hills are wetter too, but yes the Australian bush in general is scrubby, hard, with more of a grey-green colour (the gum trees) than the bright green you see in other forests.

If you go to Sydney, though, the difference in lushness/greenness is very noticeable. Trekking through the Blue Mountains felt like going through the rainforest. Likewise, the forests around Walpole have an almost rainforest look in places, especially with a lot of ferns.
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Old 03-12-2012, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Melbourne AUS
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same here in Melbourne, the never ending rain and cold has resulted in a flouro green to our grasses here.
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Old 03-12-2012, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Top of the South (Nelson), NZ
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Mud or wet ground being the exception makes a dry climate for me. Also scrubby vegetation, and creeks that only run at times. There are degrees of dry as well.

I wouldn't class my own climate as either wet or dry, even though it has a reasonably high rainfall. Sea breezes, winter frosts, and moderate sunshine tend to keep even winter ground dry, apart from extended wet spells.

The area to the east of here has a year round dry look, as would about a 1/3 of the South Island.
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Old 03-12-2012, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Originally Posted by ben86 View Post
Lack of greenery/cracked ground is the first thing, plus blue skies predominating. Our rainfall over the past 12 months puts us in semi-arid territory, though it's still very green so you wouldn't think so, especially on a cloudy day - yet. Expect photos of dried up river beds and yellow grass from me in the summer unless it starts raining soon.
Is that adjusting for temperature? A place like England needs less rain than places with hotter summers?

For me, any place that's too dry to support trees is a dry climate; the open forests of Mediterranean climates are an interesting transition, but if they're forests and not scattered trees, it's not dry.
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Old 03-12-2012, 09:58 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Is that adjusting for temperature? A place like England needs less rain than places with hotter summers?

For me, any place that's too dry to support trees is a dry climate; the open forests of Mediterranean climates are an interesting transition, but if they're forests and not scattered trees, it's not dry.
In Perth the transition from dry forest along the coastal plain, to wet forest in the hills, again to dry forest, and then to open woodland is very rapid. You can be in a pretty arid clime just two hours out of Perth.
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Old 03-12-2012, 10:24 PM
 
Location: New York City
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Somewhat related question. I know that there are places that are hot and humid but don't have a lot of rainfall. Persian Gulf area comes to mind.

Are there any places that are the opposite - that have relatively decent rainfall but the air humidity is low?
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Old 03-13-2012, 04:22 AM
 
Location: Eastern Sydney, Australia
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The vegetation often reaches it's peak of "yellowest/brownish" during spring/when persistent westerlies blow with October, usually, being the worst month. However this hasn't been the case lately thank god, vegetation is as green and lush as ever - just the way it should be
The church next door, to where I work, is over 120 years old and has fern plants growing out of the brickwork - on the roof, eaves and walls - and the footpath is all green and covered with moss.
If you had asked me this question a few years ago, yes I would have considered it semi-arid given that we (in the city that is) were running 400-500mm below average.
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Old 03-13-2012, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Eastern SD
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western great plains. There are trees in the black hills due to black hills effect snowfall but that's about it. It's just grasses otherwise that are green briefly in May and June then turn brown in July. Under 20 inches of precip yearly basically.

chinook winds amplify the effect by warming and drying the air in the cooler months.

I could handle that climate fine, but really I love the moist, humid climate with intense thunderstorms and plentiful forestcover of the eastern United States. Simply a paradise, everything east of the Mississippi river.
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Old 03-13-2012, 11:04 PM
 
Location: SoCal
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You call San Francisco dry?

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