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Old 03-16-2012, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Minnesota, USA
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Duluth (and Minnesota in general) is associated most with winter, specifically unrelenting winter cold. Duluth has the lowest average January temperature of any city its size or larger in the contiguous United States. And the cold is continuous and unforgiving. It sometimes does not rise above the freezing mark for 45 days on end in the winter, though last winter was a clear exception.

Duluth is less known for its mild summers and onshore breezes from Lake Superior, which often ruin warm spells that otherwise bring temperatures into the 70s and 80s in April and May. By the lake (in the lower part of the city), "summer" does not really begin until early July, when temperatures finally rise into the 70s. Even in the upper part of the city, away from the lake, lake breezes can bring late May and early June days that do not rise out of the lower 40s. Many people from southern Minnesota and the Twin Cities flock to Duluth on weekends, as it is often much cooler here than there.
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Old 03-16-2012, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I think my town is associated with fall; and the surrounding countryside gets fall foliage tourism. Cool to mild crisp clear days. New England is often associated with harsh winters, but that's more Northern New England.
New England does seem the archetype of a "fall spot", especially with leaf peeping -- the warm colours of red, orange and yellow covering the hillsides.

Actually, I'm hard-pressed to think of an example of another area (maybe just N. American-centered viewpoint but) that's more associated with fall/autumn foliage than that overall area (northeast, maybe to Great Lakes area and down the east coast/general eastern hardwoods). I'm sure it exists in temperate Europe and Asia, in the same climate zones but maybe it's since those places are developed/built over the hundreds to thousands of years of history not much original forest remains?

New England, the Appalachians and the east coast in the US still remain the fall-colour hotspot areas even known by other countries.
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Old 03-17-2012, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Melbourne AUS
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Yet more proof why Melbourne is notorious for its %$!#$^&O#! weather :

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Old 03-17-2012, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
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New England, and more broadly parts of Quebec and towards the Great Lakes areas, are most notable for their autumn color, at least by the population at large. It's also highly associated with winter and snow, as anyone who whines about winter weather will tell you.

And that Melbourne forecast looks nice to me for summer, but this is way too late for my taste to feature that kind of weather. Still, for summer I'd like the lows to be decreased by 7C; 17C is just too warm. I can see why you and several others really dislike the climate - it's just the sort of weather you hate, and I wish you luck in escaping from it.
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Old 03-17-2012, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Originally Posted by Flight Simmer View Post
Yet more proof why Melbourne is notorious for its %$!#$^&O#! weather :
I usually think you complain too much, but yes, even that would be a crappy summer forecast for here.
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Old 03-17-2012, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
I usually think you complain too much, but yes, even that would be a crappy summer forecast for here.
It's not really summer anymore in the southern hemisphere.
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Old 03-17-2012, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Two Rivers, Wisconsin
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Probably summer, Two Rivers is the gateway to Door County, a very touristy area in NE Wisc.!

The motto for Two Rivers is "cool city", people come to "escape" the heat of summer. Being out in the lake on a bump out gives us our own little micro climate! The lake is south and east plus river to the west lots of water creating a great deal of weather variety.
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Old 03-17-2012, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Katy, Texas
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The Air Conditioning Capital of the U.S.A (Houston)
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Old 03-17-2012, 08:06 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Depends on your perspective. Compared to much of New England and upstate NY, it's mild. And looking at the daily highs, it's warmer than anywhere in the Northeast US in January.

It gets some severe cold snaps, but the high number of mild 50+ °F days make it feel mild and give an impression of a break from winter. The high sunshine also helps; a lot of our milder winter days get cloud.
I do get what you are saying, however to be fair to the NWS data – I think it’s a bit more accurate to say that Denver is warmer than anywhere in New England in January – not the Northeast.

The January mean temp in Denver is 31.4 F….Northeastern cities like NYC (33 F)….Philadelphia (32.8 F)…Atlantic City/Trenton, NJ (33 F)…etc are actually warmer in January. Also, Denver averages 55 inches of snow annually….about double the amount of Northeastern cities like NYC (25), Philadelphia (22), Trenton (24)…etc. Also, despite the higher sun hrs in Denver in the cold season (snow melts faster I would think) – Denver still averages a far greater number of days with snow on the ground than most Northeastern cities; According to their respective NWS sites - Denver averages 44 days a year with 1 inch of snow on the ground – while NYC/Philly/Trenton …etc average 15 - 19 days with 1 inch of snow on the ground. That even shocked me.
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Old 03-17-2012, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Denver has significantly milder daytime temperatures so even if it falls to 10F overnight it could easily warm up to 50F the same day, that coupled with sunshine probably means it feels a lot warmer and more pleasant then the dreary North East. Any snow that falls in Denver doesn't last very long either.
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