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Old 03-16-2012, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,598 posts, read 15,434,529 times
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It's funny being in North Queensland, where almost everyone thinks it's hot here.
Most of the daylight hours have temperatures below 30 C/86 F with 65+% humidity.

In Perth because the humditiy is low (17-54% afternoon is typical?)
and you sweat less when there's heat,
many West Austalians seem to be hesitant to describe the weather as *hot*

Since North Queensland is very humid,
even when the sun is out it, purely on sun heat vs. shade temperature,
it feels like there's a fine shade cloth in front of the sun.

I actually prefer being out in bright sunshine
and have found North Queensland often disappointing in the daytime.
It just feels so mild, shade vs. sun... it's weird.

Heat indexes are made to adjust for humidity, but rarely ever solar intensity.
It's pretty hard to measure solar infrared intensity.
But imho, Perth's sunshine makes the air feel up to 4 C/7 F warmer than Townsville.
So 30 C here feels like 26 C in Perth.
That's why I find it silly local residents call this *hot*.

"...The humidity takes your breath away..."

how about Perth's sun's heat is enough,
the sun on your chest or back takes some of your breath away?
Hot air feels somewhat-empty, which can leave one gasping slightly.

I'll add a bit more later.

I thought this would be fun to discuss, as when I lived in Canada I'd never have enough consistant exposure to sun to discover this.
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Old 03-16-2012, 06:00 PM
 
Location: France
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Yeah, good point. Indexes like the heat index or the humidex are calculated for the thermal sensation in the shade. But once you get in the sun, it's a different story. In my experience, in humid conditions I won't feel that much warmer than the heat index, while in dry air there is a bigger difference. My experience with humid air is limited though.
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Old 03-16-2012, 08:26 PM
 
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So coldcanadian, what climate do you prefer so far? WA or QLD?
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Old 03-16-2012, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Paris
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What are you trying to say exactly...?

Humidity makes warm temps feel less warm? If that's your point, that's something I've been trying to say for years if not, please explain ^^

Anyway, I envy you so much. Townsville looks like a fantastic, A-grade climate. Enjoy it for me
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Old 03-16-2012, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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I think I know what you mean.. I can see Townsville feeling less oppressive. I remember visiting North Queensland and never had any problems at all. I thoroughly enjoyed every moment of it
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Old 03-16-2012, 10:45 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Coastal Queensland's climate isn't that bad as far as tropical climates go. I'd say the Kimberley is considerably worse.
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Old 03-16-2012, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Top of the South (Nelson), NZ
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I asked a question similar to this recently, but got little interest.

A thermometer in the sun gets higher readings just after a cool change, when humidity is lower. It is a very pronounced difference, in perceived heat and thermometer readings. In winter the difference is less noticeable.
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Old 03-17-2012, 12:39 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Coastal Queensland's climate isn't that bad as far as tropical climates go. I'd say the Kimberley is considerably worse.
True, areas at similar latitudes as Townsville along the Kimberley/Pilbara coast of WA are considerably warmer.

I do agree that although Perth's temperatures are made to feel cooler by lower humidity levels, this is sort of counteracted by temperatures in the direct sun often being quite hot due to the increased solar radiation caused by the lower humidity levels and cloud cover.
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Old 03-17-2012, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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I still think humidity is more uncomfortable. I was in Seville in September and temps were in the mid 90's. Felt really comfortable in the shade.
I remember being in Orlando one year in August and though temps peaked in the low 90's, it felt much worse than Seville.

Townsville climate looks like paradise for warm lovers. Winter temps are perfect. I prefer cooler winters (like the Med), but I would love to esacpe winter there for a few weeks each year.

Off topic, but met some Aussies last night at a local pub. They are touring the US East Coast. Someone asked them how was their summer. They said "we didn't have one, it rained sixty days straight" or something to that effect. Must look really lush right about now there.
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Old 03-17-2012, 12:41 PM
 
4,637 posts, read 1,682,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I still think humidity is more uncomfortable. I was in Seville in September and temps were in the mid 90's. Felt really comfortable in the shade.
I remember being in Orlando one year in August and though temps peaked in the low 90's, it felt much worse than Seville.

Townsville climate looks like paradise for warm lovers. Winter temps are perfect. I prefer cooler winters (like the Med), but I would love to esacpe winter there for a few weeks each year.

Off topic, but met some Aussies last night at a local pub. They are touring the US East Coast. Someone asked them how was their summer. They said "we didn't have one, it rained sixty days straight" or something to that effect. Must look really lush right about now there.
That is always true for me too, was in moab, utah where the temps were 100f and it did not even feel that hot, I guess because of low humidity. But when I was in new orleans in the summer it was too humid to be outside when the temps were only 94f.

I heard that too about the cool australian summer for the east australia, think sydney only had a few days over 30 which is rare.
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