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Old 03-27-2012, 07:54 PM
 
Location: :0)1 CORINTHIANS,13*"KYRIE, ELEISON!"*"CHRISTE, ELEISON" KYRIE, ELEISON!"0)
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Which states have four distinct seasons, and how harsh is each one?
Especially winter and summer.
Of the ones listed, which ones have the least degree of humidity in the summer.

Thanks!
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Old 03-27-2012, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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That'll probably depend a lot on your criteria for what marks the seasons (eg. do you consider winter to have happened only when it goes below freeezing etc. and other "boundaries")

There has been a lot of discussion on this forum as to who thinks which climates are truly 4-season ones as well as how many climates' seasons are more distinct in various ways (eg. snowfall, temperature, sunshine etc.) than others.
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Old 03-28-2012, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Paris
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Florida has 4

Unpleasantly cold in winter
Pleasantly warm and dry in spring
Pleasantly hot and humid in summer
Pleasantly warm and dry in autumn

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Old 03-28-2012, 12:53 AM
 
Location: :0)1 CORINTHIANS,13*"KYRIE, ELEISON!"*"CHRISTE, ELEISON" KYRIE, ELEISON!"0)
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Thumbs down Noooooooo!!! I want fall, snow, cold, not different variations of humidity, LOL!;)

Quote:
Originally Posted by dhdh View Post
Florida has 4

Unpleasantly cold in winter
Pleasantly warm and dry in spring
Pleasantly hot and humid in summer
Pleasantly warm and dry in autumn

Not what I was looking for LOL!
Thanks, it made me laugh!

I could never live in Florida, no offense to Florida residents I am sure its lovelyLOL! Just not for me....
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Old 03-28-2012, 01:20 AM
 
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When I think of a 4 season climate, I think of New England.
Vermont and New Hampshire IMO have got
the 4 seasons just about right, nice summers (not too hot),
fantastic falls, great winters, nice springs too
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Old 03-28-2012, 05:48 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
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Chicago and Des Moines, with their Dfa climates, have a rather even four-season climate, with a real winter of about 3 months in length leading into a real summer about 3 months in length. However both of their winters leave much to be desired from where I stand.

New England is a bit different but has a good example of a four-season climate, but it depends on where you go. The interior will have a better climate in this regard than the coast; however anywhere in Maine will be good. The Adirondacks in upstate New York are another prime example. Summers in interior locations, Maine, and the Adirondacks are warm to moderately hot (75-85F) with nights usually in the 50's F to around 60F. Winters are usually cold and snowy but not what I'd call harsh, averaging in the 20's to around freezing for highs and usually teens for lows. Snowfall is between 50 and 100 inches per season.

One can get a four-season climate, in various forms, as far north as Fort McMurray, Alberta, and as far south as Huntsville, Alabama. However the southern-end, which feature dominant summers and weaker winters, are very poor candidates if you want snow. Generally stick to Koeppen group D, which feature temperatures cold enough for a persistent snowpack.

As far as summers go, throughout the vast majority of the U.S. summers will be hot; hot and dry in the west, and hot and humid in the east. Summers are harsh, with heat and humidity being dominant, basically from Chicago and New York's latitude and farther south. In the West it depends mostly on altitude. If you want a hot summer, look at the Dfa and Cfa climate types. There's a belt that feature real winters among the Dfa climates, but be aware there is frequent above-freezing temperatures, rain, and subpar snow totals.

This is a map I made illustrating, on a general state-wide basis, which states have four season climates. The light blue is a summer-dominated version with a weak winter, the dark blue is the even hot summer/cold winter states, and the purple is a winter-dominated version with a weak summer:



To answer your original question, it seems that you want a place that has a real winter with snow, and a low-humidity summer.

In that case looking west (west of Iowa, Minnesota) would be the best choice, with the lower-humidity summers they have there (the eastern states, Iowa/Minnesota eastward have humid summers). If you want plenty of cold and snow there are many choices, a few of which I will list:

Jackson, Wyoming
Aspen, Colorado
Vail, Colorado
Anywhere in the Black Hills (South Dakota)
Lake Tahoe, California
Bozeman, Montana
Logan, Utah

Of these all have low-humidity summers, and of these Logan, Utah is the harshest in the summer (average high 87F), and Lake Tahoe is the least harsh, averaging lows in the 40's. Of the winters Vail and Jackson are the coldest. Lake Tahoe, the Black Hills, and Aspen are the snowiest of the bunch.

Look at these choices and decide which ones you like best - perhaps I can provide additional input when some more information is given. Pretty much any resort town in the mountains will be favorable, so try and find some of their climate stats.
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Old 03-28-2012, 06:20 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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That map is too general Patricius, because most places in Oregon and Washington will have four season climates won't they?
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Old 03-28-2012, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
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Most people are surprised to learn this, but EASTERN WASHINGTON has four distinct seasons. Cold and snowy in the winter, hot and dry in the summer, and low humidity year round (especially during the summer months). Lots of sunshine too, so much more than in Western Washington.

I would also most certainly consider Interior Alaska as 4 seasons too, just that winter is very long. In Fairbanks, for example, there are four months in the summer have average highs over 60, with two of those having average highs over 70. Fairbanks even has a record high of 99 degrees! And people think its always cold in Alaska LOL!
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Old 03-28-2012, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
That map is too general Patricius, because most places in Oregon and Washington will have four season climates won't they?
My thoughts exactly. In fact a lot of those grey shaded states have inhabited towns and cities of four seasons.
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Old 03-28-2012, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
5,115 posts, read 2,850,780 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
That map is too general Patricius, because most places in Oregon and Washington will have four season climates won't they?
I agree, but the OP asked for states, and that was the best state-wide generalization that I could make - Eastern Washington and Oregon do have four-season climates, but the western part doesn't as much. One can also count the Sierra Nevada in California as having four seasons. However neither is representative of their whole state.

Also Alaska is a poor example of four seasons. It's much like the Deep South, with the Interior having long winters, then breakup, then spring (or summer as it's known there), then back to winter. Unless one counts breakup as a distinct season, Alaskan climates don't have four seasons seeing as they don't transition to a full summer. Seasonal? Definitely. Four-season climate? Not really. The subarctic falls under a different class and system than someplace like Upper Michigan.
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