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Old 04-09-2012, 01:53 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
SophieLL might fall under the mild coolness category rather than mild warmth, it's hard to tell.
yes, you are right, nei, iam the mild coolness representative on this forum, i think!

and Mar del Plata is a decent oceanic weather, as you say, thought you have to take in coun that it only haves 1900 sunshine hours and for some people that must feel kinda dark/cloudy??

otherwise is a great oceanic climate, with the breeze and ocean wind all year, really comfortable and cool. Living there is cooler than what numbers may say. Being on the ocean and so windy makes MDP feels cooler than what it is most of the time. Also, remind that MDP ocean is very cold, compared to others. Such as the pacific in northamerica for example.
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Old 04-09-2012, 02:23 AM
 
Location: Cloudchurch, Subantarctica
2,602 posts, read 1,736,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
SophieLL might fall under the mild coolness category rather than mild warmth, it's hard to tell.
By "mild coolness" I mean climates like Edinburgh. Sophie's ideal would probably be at the upper end of Oceanic climates.
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Old 04-09-2012, 04:44 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
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Sophieland, your paradise goes from (in Fahrenheit) 50's in winter to 70's in summer for your average highs. That's not what I'd describe as mild coolness - I'd describe that as just mild or mild warmth.

"Mild coolness" to me is represented by something like Reykjavik, the Aleutian Islands (one example), or on another level Bergen and Edinburgh. Torshavn may be the best example. Even Kerguelen Island would be a better match than Sophieland for mild coolness.

As for it being on the upper end of oceanic climates, Sophie's hottest month has a daily mean of 68F, which is safely below the 72F boundary. It's still on the high side though, so it's not exactly the epitome of a maritime climate, but I hardly think that was the Sophie's intent .
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Old 04-09-2012, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Paris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChesterNZ View Post
I would say that classic temperate oceanic climates have a warmest month mean of less than 20 C / 68 F and coldest month mean of more than 0 C / 32 F.
That would dismiss a good part of France, including Paris, which is excluded with the 22C/72F boundary.

I don't like north American oceanic climates because of their rainfall pattern and southern hemisphere one have a smaller temperature range than European one, so Europe it is.
If we stick with the 0C/32F boundary, then my pick would be somewhere like Berlin. If -3C/27F is permitted, then Warsaw is my pick. Though I wouldn't call Warsaw oceanic.
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Old 04-09-2012, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rozenn View Post
That would dismiss a good part of France, including Paris, which is excluded with the 22C/72F boundary.
Actually, it wouldn't. You're probably confusing daily means (avg. of high and low) with the average daily high. Paris's average daily high is 77F, but since it has a low of 60F in the hottest month, the daily mean is 69F, which is a bit below 72F.
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Old 04-09-2012, 05:21 AM
 
Location: Paris
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Oh this was a typo, my bad. Read: "which isn't excluded with the 22C/72F boundary".
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Old 04-09-2012, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
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Ah, I see. Paris is definitely an oceanic climate. Still, what I'd call "classic oceanic climates" would have summers cooler than 77/60F. Excluding most of France isn't much of a problem seeing as this is just a subset. My subset would probably be centered on a place like Edinburgh, with its summers that average 66/52F, and winters that average 44/34F. That's warm summers with a tight range, that still maintain the Koeppen standard of 4+ months of 10+ Celsius, coupled with winters that average above freezing, where cold rain is the norm but some snow still falls in the winter. That would be my vision of "classic oceanic", but the whole question of whether something is classical or not is irrelevant to me.

As for the epitome of maritime climates, I'd pick a cool, really wet location that also gets a lot of snow in winter, but at the same time has cool summers. Port Walter, Alaska is the best example of that.
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Old 04-09-2012, 06:33 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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When I entered this thread I did not at all expect to see places in Alaska and South Africa being mentioned, to me they are not really maritime climates.. some are too cold and others are too warm.

Edinburgh is definitely one of the best examples of a maritime climate where winters are chilly, as Patricius says, cold rain is the norm, but snow still falls on an annual basis, and summers are mild.

I think Glasgow is a better example of a maritime climate though, the averages are virtually the same as Edinburgh but it is a lot wetter, and cloudier.
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Old 04-09-2012, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Just looking at a weather site for the Isle of Barra in the UK.

Records go back to the 1940's at least, and the record high is 19.5c and the record low is -3.1c.. how is that for maritime?
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Old 04-09-2012, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
5,575 posts, read 3,926,693 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Just looking at a weather site for the Isle of Barra in the UK.

Records go back to the 1940's at least, and the record high is 19.5c and the record low is -3.1c.. how is that for maritime?
Wow... how many frosts a year does that place get?
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