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Old 04-16-2012, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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That's why dry heat and humid heat has little difference to me, a dry heat in Phoenix sounds terrible, more so then humid heat in Florida, in my opinion. Dry heat sucks the water out of you.. leaving you feeling lethargic, dizzy etc.
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Old 04-16-2012, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Laurentia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Another point, heat does something that humidity can't. A 100F heat index (from high humidity) won't make your steering wheel too hot to touch, make pavement start to get soft, do weird things to household items to the degree a true 100F temperature would.

And dry heat has it's own dangers, mainly the 100F temperature rather than a 100F heat index gives a higher degree of dehydration. Sure, if you drink enough water you're safe, but it feels like the water is being sucked out of you.
Dry heat is a "purer heat" and I'd rather deal with just heat than a lesser degree of heat plus humidity. Keep in mind that high humidity has it's own dangers, namely extreme sweating, increased risk of heat stroke vs. a dry heat at the same temperature, shade offering no relief, and last but not least asphyxiation. At dew points of 80F for higher I and most other people find it difficult to breathe as there's a sensation of an elephant being on one's chest. At dew points much higher than that there is a significant risk of suffocation. As for myself I'd rather drink a lot of water than be subject to that sensation, if we're comparing extreme heat to extreme humidity with less extreme heat.

Difficult breathing is a danger in extreme dry heat as well, I think beginning at some level over 120F, but extreme humidity has a host of other dangers and discomforts and seems to be more common as well. I also believe that the sensation of extreme heat is not as oppressive as extreme humidity.

I would also like to add that I've been in dry weather and dry heat as well. Granted not anything like 1% humidity but I've been in the 10-20% range on occasion. I have never felt anything remotely approaching the sensation you describe, of water being sucked out of me. It's very easy for me to hydrate, and even if it wasn't it sure beats having high humidity; at least I can do something to counteract the dry weather. There is absolutely no remedy for extreme humidity.

Of course both options are extremely uncomfortable to me and probably lethal as well; a dry 100F or 120F is pure misery and I'd say horrific, especially with surfaces being too hot to handle and melting (though I will say I've seen the former in weather a lot cooler than 100F). I will say, however, that the horror of a dry heat index of 100F or 120F pales in comparison to the level of horror experienced with a 100F or 120F heat index driven by extreme humidity; the humid one will be a lot worse for me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
That's why dry heat and humid heat has little difference to me, a dry heat in Phoenix sounds terrible, more so then humid heat in Florida, in my opinion. Dry heat sucks the water out of you.. leaving you feeling lethargic, dizzy etc.
I don't think there's much difference between the heat of Florida and Arizona. Aside from both of them obviously being extremely uncomfortable to me, we're comparing a dry 110F to a humid 90F, which is a somewhat slanted comparison. I will say that I feel lethargic and dizzy in the typical humid heat of the South, so I can't say my experience of that condition is anything unique to drier, more extreme heat; if anything a drier dew point would make me feel better, given that I usually experience difficulty breathing in addition to lethargy and dizziness when it's really muggy. I don't imagine when humidity is taken into account that a hot day in Phoenix would be much worse for me than a hot day in Memphis or Dallas.
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Old 04-16-2012, 08:37 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
63F wasn't that much above average. The average monthly dew point I found skimming through the summer months was 59F-63F or so.
Last summer seemed more humid than usual, but maybe it was only because I paid more attention to dewpoint last year.
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Old 04-17-2012, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Paris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flight Simmer View Post
most people here do have both A/C and heating. Pretty much all houses newer than about 20 years old have central heating and A/C. Some people go nuts with the AC though, there is one household next to the park where I walk my dog who still blasts the AC about 5 hours after a cold front has passed thru, or if the afternoon temp ever exceeds about 24-25C

Highest recorded temp in Melbourne's metropolitan area is 47.9C, so A/C is needed at times
Yup 48C definitely qualifies as AC weather.



Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
That's impressively hot; I'm not sure how I'd deal. Could some people sleep outside, as they used to New York?

How New Yorkers survived hot summer nights Ephemeral New York

Or I guess it's not the 1930s..
Never seen that (our alternative to fire escapes would be balconies). However people rushed towards portable fans to the point that they went out of stock rapidly.



Quote:
My guess is around 70% of people here have A/C, but it's hard to get a good sample. People in their 20s (I think) are less likely to have an A/C than families, especially if they're renting in old houses / buildings.
Thanks to the coolish nights, your summers seem pretty livable without AC. Though people wanting 24/7 comfort or heat haters would definitely need it. The good thing is that, living in a house, once has many more options than living in a flat, like moving downstairs or even sleeping in the garden if it's that bad.
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Old 04-17-2012, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rozenn View Post
The good thing is that, living in a house, once has many more options than living in a flat, like moving downstairs or even sleeping in the garden if it's that bad.
That's not much help if you're hot and are already living downstairs .
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Well, during hot spells, my dogs will sleep on the cold kitchen floor to keep cold. Not much I can do though other then open the windows, allowing many spiders to enter my house.
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Well, during hot spells, my dogs will sleep on the cold kitchen floor to keep cold. Not much I can do though other then open the windows, allowing many spiders to enter my house.
Why don't British homes have screens?
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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You can buy them, yeah. I have screens for my doors but that's it.
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Here it's the norm for any window that opens to have a screen. Sounds very strange to me.
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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It's probably because sticky nights aren't common here, even during hot spells it usually cools down quite rapidly at night.
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