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Old 04-23-2012, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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Default Years with a Skipped Winter

People seem to be getting irritated about all my threads about the summer of 2009, so i thought i would give you winter lovers a chance to rant. What years did you think you got the raw deal in terms of winter? I would definitely say 1998, 2002, and 2012 were awful winters for cold-lovers. Toward the middle of February this past winter, i was actually hoping for it to snow, just because i felt sorry for my friends who love to ski and could not go skiing.

Are there any other years that should be included in the mix? Also, what were some of the best winters? 2011 was pretty cold and snowy if my memory is correct.
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Old 04-23-2012, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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2007/2008, 1997/1998, 188/1989 are all winters that were exceptionally mild and snowless, but all had snow at some point.
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Old 04-23-2012, 08:17 AM
Status: "Welcome to Fall, Florida-style" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Atlanta
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Down here in the South, the question to ask is what years we actually get a winter...lol. The winter of 2010-11 is a good example - it was marked by long periods of below-normal temps and a massive snow/ice storm which crippled the Atlanta area for nearly a week - my house didn't get mail for 9 days in a row, as there was no way for the mail trucks to navigate the steep, ice-covered hills in my neighborhood. Fun times, indeed.

Otherwise, most of our winters would count as "skipped winters" with autumn running very late and spring starting far too soon for my taste. Imagine raking leaves at Christmastime and then watching the daffodils blooming less than a month later - what kind of sick joke is that?
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Old 05-11-2012, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Laurentia
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Looking back, the winter of 1932 looks particularly awful for anyone that wanted something resembling a winter. With the already lackluster averages of this red and orange swath, it must have been a brutal time for any winter fan. From what I've seen of it on the New England weather forums, it looked just as bad as it was. Of course this applies to the East. In the West, they were much colder than normal, but I don't think that's the main subject of this thread.

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Old 05-11-2012, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Laurentia
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For comparison, see the same maps for 1998, 2002, and 2012, the winters that lpfan mentioned. Cold lovers sure got the raw deal in those three winters as well, but 1932 was different.









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Old 05-11-2012, 09:17 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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2001-2002 was absolutely awful. I remember because we had no snow days!
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Old 05-11-2012, 09:59 PM
 
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I would say 2012 and 2010 for wpg. Snowed late dec and melted early march
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Old 05-12-2012, 05:51 AM
 
Location: CT - close to coast
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Winters of:

1954-55
1958-59
1972-73
1979-80
1980-81
1988-89
1996-97
1997-98
1999-00
2001-02
2006-07
2011-12

Looks like about 2 per decade. 60s was a good decade.
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Old 05-12-2012, 06:19 AM
Status: "Welcome to Fall, Florida-style" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Atlanta
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Hard to believe that the winter of '32 was 5.5 degrees warmer here in Georgia than 2012 - that must have been unreal. I do wonder how the foliage did in that year - the trees must have started leafing out in late January and reached full leaf by March. And global warming certainly wasn't a concept back then...lol.
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Old 05-12-2012, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Winters of:

1954-55
1958-59
1972-73
1979-80
1980-81
1988-89
1996-97
1997-98
1999-00
2001-02
2006-07
2011-12

Looks like about 2 per decade. 60s was a good decade.
That just shows how "uneven" the American climate is overall when it comes to winter. That's far too many years for my taste. Having no winter at all is easy, but having a winter that goes beyond a few weeks of snowfall and some cold temperatures that flip to warmth before winter's over seems to be almost impossible for most of the U.S.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post
Hard to believe that the winter of '32 was 5.5 degrees warmer here in Georgia than 2012 - that must have been unreal. I do wonder how the foliage did in that year - the trees must have started leafing out in late January and reached full leaf by March.
The map shows a mean temperature of 56F. Unless January and/or late autumn was much colder than the rest of the winter months, I don't imagine that trees ever went into dormancy, considering that 50F is the threshold for trees to come out of dormancy and grow. That 56F figure is probably for central Georgia, since that's about average for the state, and your location was cooler (these sites south of Atlanta are on the margin of dormancy in a normal winter anyway). Still, in all likelihood there was no dormancy period in the Atlanta area.

Quote:
And global warming certainly wasn't a concept back then...lol.
Strangely enough, it was, at least in a certain way. I read somewhere where the people in the Northeast by the late 1940's thought the climate had changed and they couldn't get any more cold or big snowfalls. Of course they were proven wrong by some of the winters of that same era, and after the horror of the 1950's, there was some more cold and snow in the 1960's. People back then thought it was a naturally-occurring development, and with the state of the PDO and so forth they were partly right. I'm sure industrial emissions played a role as well, but with both the 1920's-40's warming and the 1980's-2000's warming, I believe the natural cycles and CO2 both were significant contributors.

There are reports of thinner arctic sea ice and warmer conditions during that era than the previous era and the subsequent 1960's-70's. Though not as warm as it has been during the more recent warming, it's part of the oft-forgotten first period of global warming in the earlier half of the 20th century.
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