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Old 06-01-2012, 12:33 PM
 
Location: London
777 posts, read 329,287 times
Reputation: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flight Simmer View Post
We all know that Yuma is the sunniest place on Earth, but what about the most dank, dark overcast hellholes? Yes, there are places like the Svalbards, Shetlands, Macquarie Island, the extreme south of Chile and the like which officially record between 800-900 hours of sunshine a year, but are there any cloudier places? it seems that data for extremely cloudy climates is harder to come by, and many contenders may not even have weather stations. I've heard that Campbell Island, NZ is the cloudiest place in the world, along with parts of the Aleutian Islands and extreme southern chile...

Discuss the hellholes of the world!
Interesting topic...
I would just like to add that there are probably sunnier places on Earth than Yuma, AZ. It's just that the United States is very fortunate in being a) a very large country of continental proportions, with a huge variety of climates, including extremely sunny ones and b) at the same time being a rich country with the resources and infrastructure to spend on a dense network of sophisticated weather stations which poorer countries can't afford. Reliable sunshine data is notoriously pretty hard to find outside developed nations....speech over.

Now back to the topic:
Possible candidates: the above-mentioned Aleutian Islands and the northernmost islands of Japan, the adjacent Russian archipelago and much of the Kamchatka peninsula's coastline. Other contenders are coastal Peru and parts of coastal Chile (in spite of their extreme aridity they suffer from constant coastal fog - a bit like a perpetual San Francisco summer!). Unfortunately, as I pointed out reliable sunshine data is pretty scarce in many of these areas, some of which are very remote.
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Old 06-01-2012, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Laurentia
5,031 posts, read 2,553,897 times
Reputation: 1768
Quote:
Originally Posted by rainroosty View Post
"Hellhole"? I despise the sun. I wish it was cloudy as heck 364 days per year! (The one sunny day being for nostalgia purposes only).
That bit about "nostalgia purposes only" was my humor for the day .

As for the cloudiest places in the world, I think the Kuril Islands are poor candidates. The sunshine figures aren't that low in nearby areas with sunshine stats, and even a 500 hour depression vs. Kamchatka wouldn't cut it for the cloudiest spot on Earth.
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Old 06-01-2012, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
4,035 posts, read 2,824,151 times
Reputation: 1698
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superluminal View Post
Interesting topic...
I would just like to add that there are probably sunnier places on Earth than Yuma, AZ. It's just that the United States is very fortunate in being a) a very large country of continental proportions, with a huge variety of climates, including extremely sunny ones and b) at the same time being a rich country with the resources and infrastructure to spend on a dense network of sophisticated weather stations which poorer countries can't afford. Reliable sunshine data is notoriously pretty hard to find outside developed nations....speech over.

Now back to the topic:
Possible candidates: the above-mentioned Aleutian Islands and the northernmost islands of Japan, the adjacent Russian archipelago and much of the Kamchatka peninsula's coastline. Other contenders are coastal Peru and parts of coastal Chile (in spite of their extreme aridity they suffer from constant coastal fog - a bit like a perpetual San Francisco summer!). Unfortunately, as I pointed out reliable sunshine data is pretty scarce in many of these areas, some of which are very remote.
Using measurement types used in some other countries, Yuma would probably come out about 200 hours lower, equal to an estimate from satellite methods (mentioned in an older thread). Some of the older reference books refer to the eastern Sahara exceeding 95% of possible sun in places, but this may have just been speculative.

Coastal Chile's desert is not nearly as cloudy as the world's cloudy zones (again, this has been covered before). Even Arica in the north gets about 2300 hours of sun per year. Lima in Peru however is only around the 1400 mark. A bit further north in Ecuador the coastal places may be a little cloudier still, but not by very much.

The potential champions (but with available daylight amounts still unclear) appear to be South Orkney and Bornoya, as mentioned.
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