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Old 05-28-2012, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Melbourne AUS
1,156 posts, read 747,481 times
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We all know that Yuma is the sunniest place on Earth, but what about the most dank, dark overcast hellholes? Yes, there are places like the Svalbards, Shetlands, Macquarie Island, the extreme south of Chile and the like which officially record between 800-900 hours of sunshine a year, but are there any cloudier places? it seems that data for extremely cloudy climates is harder to come by, and many contenders may not even have weather stations. I've heard that Campbell Island, NZ is the cloudiest place in the world, along with parts of the Aleutian Islands and extreme southern chile...

Discuss the hellholes of the world!
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Old 05-28-2012, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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I've been told that the Kuril Islands in Russia are the cloudiest places in the world but have no reliable data or any data at all.
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Old 05-28-2012, 08:05 AM
NCN
 
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You might want to start with Clingman's Dome in the Great Smoky Mountains. It was a sunny day elsewhere so we drove there. About 2/3 way up the mountain the weather started changing. When we got there, we were literally in the clouds. I asked at the guest shop how many days a year you could see a long way and the answer was, "Not many."
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Old 05-28-2012, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCN View Post
You might want to start with Clingman's Dome in the Great Smoky Mountains. It was a sunny day elsewhere so we drove there. About 2/3 way up the mountain the weather started changing. When we got there, we were literally in the clouds. I asked at the guest shop how many days a year you could see a long way and the answer was, "Not many."
Actually, that title should go to Mt Washington. I visited there around August 10th one year, and the visibility was so great that I could see all the way to the ocean. I asked the friendly forest ranger on duty how often the summit gets uber-clear days like this one, and he said that this was the first day of the season that it was like this. I remarked that I must be pretty lucky, and said, "Oh yes, very."

Of course, I tend to scare the clouds away no matter where I go....lol.
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Old 05-28-2012, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Buxton, England
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The UK has to be one of the cloudiest if not the cloudiest "major" country in the world.
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Old 05-28-2012, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Paris
2,360 posts, read 1,831,451 times
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Hong Kong

Just kidding, though spring in Hong Kong is the most cloudy environment I have ever been subject to. (30 hours in Feb. 2010, routinely less than 100 hours in April/May/June)

Among large cities, it has to be Chongqing : Chongqing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In terms of % possible sunshine for a given month, I'd say September in Lima looks pretty bad : Lima - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
though the data on the Wiki article looks hardly accurate.

Has anyone got reliable sunshine data for those insular hellholes such as mentioned above?
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Old 05-28-2012, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Melbourne AUS
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Chongqing is ridiculous, although I cannot help but think that pollution and smog contributes to the reduced sunshine.

I've heard values of around 600 hours thrown around for Campbell Is, NZ....
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Old 05-28-2012, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Melbourne AUS
1,156 posts, read 747,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhdh View Post
Hong Kong

Just kidding, though spring in Hong Kong is the most cloudy environment I have ever been subject to. (30 hours in Feb. 2010, routinely less than 100 hours in April/May/June)
wow! I had no idea Hong Kong could be so cloudy But looking at their annual sunshine, Hong Kong recieves 500 hours less sunshine than Melbourne (1835 vs 2370)!!! Cloudiest month a mere 91 hours (3 per day!!!) and the sunniest a mediocre 212 hours. That is news to me!


Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post

Of course, I tend to scare the clouds away no matter where I go....lol.
Get your ass on a plane to Melbourne right now
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Old 05-28-2012, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
2,888 posts, read 1,533,017 times
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Apparently Atlas Cove on Heard Island sees an average cloud cover reading of 7.3 oktas, not sure about average annual sunshine hours but this compares to an average of 6.9 oktas at Macquarie Island.

Climate & Weather - Heard Island
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Old 05-28-2012, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
28,665 posts, read 14,929,576 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthStarDelight View Post
Actually, that title should go to Mt Washington. I visited there around August 10th one year, and the visibility was so great that I could see all the way to the ocean. I asked the friendly forest ranger on duty how often the summit gets uber-clear days like this one, and he said that this was the first day of the season that it was like this. I remarked that I must be pretty lucky, and said, "Oh yes, very."
Mt. Washington gets a fair share of clear days; I've been on the summit on clear days more often than not (obviously bad sample as I try to go to the mountain on good weather days).

It's nowhere near the cloudiest place in the world; it has an average of 33% possible of sunshine possible. Even if American sunshine observation exaggerate, it's still sunnier than much of Scotland, let alone some of the places the OP mentioned.

Sunshine- Average Percent (%) Possible

No observations on Cligmans' Dome; but my guess would be it's a bit cloudier in the summer due to higher local humidity. Rest of the year might be sunnier.
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