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Old 07-06-2012, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
76,697 posts, read 61,763,427 times
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Last year was Texas..this year its focused on the Plains area. The persistant Ridge centered over Mississppi valley will continue with some breaks Like next week but in general this pattern is here to stay for now.

National Weather Service, Lincoln IL -- Drought Update

Mid West Update: Drought

MO & KS Update: drought

Pictures of farms
Drought Pictures | Illinois State Climatologist



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Old 07-06-2012, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
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It also looks like most of the rest of the States are in drought. I like it better that way myself. I like the dry, dusty, non-muddy ground, and the non-waterlogged, brownish grass and plants (but not too brown; wet enough to be green but not bright green, if you know what I mean). I've looked at some of the stats and for a lot of these drought-stricken places they've gotten enough rain by my standards. It seems like any time the ground dries out enough so that it isn't muddy they say there's a big drought . That said, the rainfall is far below normal and the crops are suffering, both from the heat as well as the drought (if it was dry but chilly (how I like it), I'm sure the dessication would be less severe). I hope that at least the red zones are taken down a notch or two - D0, D1, and D2 can stay there as long as they please .
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Old 07-06-2012, 06:08 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
76,697 posts, read 61,763,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patricius Maximus View Post
It also looks like most of the rest of the States are in drought. I like it better that way myself. I like the dry, dusty, non-muddy ground, and the non-waterlogged, brownish grass and plants (but not too brown; wet enough to be green but not bright green, if you know what I mean). I've looked at some of the stats and for a lot of these drought-stricken places they've gotten enough rain by my standards. It seems like any time the ground dries out enough so that it isn't muddy they say there's a big drought . That said, the rainfall is far below normal and the crops are suffering, both from the heat as well as the drought (if it was dry but chilly (how I like it), I'm sure the dessication would be less severe). I hope that at least the red zones are taken down a notch or two - D0, D1, and D2 can stay there as long as they please .
We agree on many things but this is not one of them. As a gardener I understand what is needed for healthy crops. Once a crop starts showing signs of stress it is extremely hard to get them back to normal levels after a prolonged period of stress and disease.

That being said, When temps are in the 90s the ground moisture evaporates, so forget about the rain they had, thats long gone. Sucked up by the plants and evaporated by the heat.

The drought has to "start" somewhere, you cant just say everything is great then go straight into a severe drought... So thats why we use the scales, D0, D1 and D2 are the signs that things are escallating into what could become severe... Like I said, there's no ground moisture now, they need rain badly. Those crops & soil looks horrible.

The other thing to think about is the fact that we get most of our produce and maybe even export some too from the area, so that will not only hurt the food industry but the economy as well and prices will go up.
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Old 07-06-2012, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Upstate, South Carolina
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I'm glad someone finally posted something about the drought, the underlying story behind the record highs/ record lows back and forth is the incredible drought that is gripping a huge portion of the country, it looks like things are going to break a bit in the east again, but the dry air that caused record lows in SC, which I loved, also welcomed in the 100 degree days (not much love on my part). The heat is not the headline of this summer to me in any way because there have been many normal, and cooler then normal days, but almost everyone is under the average precip totals.
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Old 07-06-2012, 06:24 AM
 
Location: Buxton, England
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I wish we could have a drought... but nah we just get 100's inches of rain as usual. All that boy crying wolf about drought early in the year was dumb and stupid, we all knew how that would go. Anyway the country hadn't even experienced a technical nor official drought, the damn water companies just let the water leak away which is the cause of all those problems.
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Old 07-06-2012, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Just for the record.. Things always even out in the end. I NEVER look at a drought in a long term way because eventually it gets back to normal from 1 big storm (Florida is an example with Debby) or a wetter pattern like NorthEast/Texas.

However, it definetly doesnt mean ignore it. Short term effects are concerning (especially for crops).. Unfortunetly human population is out of hand and we have to feed a ton of people now.
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Old 07-06-2012, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Surface Temps for Saturday (Hottest day of week) After this the heat goes to the West. GFS is ALWAYS on the cooler side. Not sure why they dont update that model.

These are not real feels!

Euro.


GFS


NAM
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Old 07-06-2012, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
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There are places and crops that are more dry-resistant or dry-sensitive than others. As Cambium said, the heat helps the drought along a great deal - if the temperature was 60F rather than 100F the effects wouldn't be nearly as severe. Also, I don't discount the impacts to the crops which, unlike myself, need a lot of rain to be healthy. However, I still like the drier conditions. I am neither a plant nor a farmer so my preferences aren't beholden to plant life. If they sicken and die the agricultural industry will have to adapt. That said, I don't live in the dusted-up areas they're moaning about, so if their ground muddies up I won't be complaining. I also don't intend to "troll" against farmers - I'm simply pointing out my own preferences and observations. When a place gets 30 inches of rain instead of 50 I welcome it, since I simply like the 30-inch figure better.

I think it's funny that in some places they're moaning about how dry it is and how bad it is for the crops when they get 40 inches of rain per year rather than 50, yet in some other places they grow staple crops just fine when it only rains 15 inches per year .

I've also found that, judging from pictures and my own experiences, when the rainfall level is such that I like the way the ground and dirt looks and feels, the mud goes away, and the plants are a normal green instead of a veritably fluorescent green, I turn on the TV to find everyone moaning about how dry it is and how they're in a severe drought. I always found that to be rather odd. I guess those conditions somehow register in my brain as normal, whereas others don't seem to be satisfied until there's mud everywhere.

As for the D0, D1, and D2 preceding more extreme droughts, that isn't always the case. Sure, if they continue to get little to no rain it will worsen but I've seen many instances where there's a rainfall pattern that maintains a slight drought (D0/D1/D2). I don't think that's going to happen in these cases, but I'd just like to point out that moderate droughts aren't a point of no return.
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Old 07-06-2012, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
76,697 posts, read 61,763,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patricius Maximus View Post
I think it's funny that in some places they're moaning about how dry it is and how bad it is for the crops when they get 40 inches of rain per year rather than 50, yet in some other places they grow staple crops just fine when it only rains 15 inches per year .
.
You cannot compare one farm area to another... lets factor in some of these below and you might rethink that statement.

~ Ground moisture more present and obtained in other areas
~ Able to tap into rivers and Lakes
~ Temps arent as hot
~ Air isnt as dry

Just those 4 factors are reasons why some areas do better with less rain than others.

And believe me, I see what 7 days of 90s and no rain does to mine, you cant go by an entire years worth of rain...You have to look at it from a week to week basis.

I also like dryness but where I am, not where its crucial for us. I'm not a big eater but I know why we need farms to prosper. Next time you go food shopping, look on the shelf, 90% of the products come from crops whether its ingrediant form or an actual product.

Just to repoint again, Last months rain is long gone if temps are hot. Crops dont have tree roots or able to retain moisture like trees. Rain needs to come on a daily or weekly basis. Reset the counter to 0 after 3 weeks if its in the 90s all the time.
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Old 07-06-2012, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
76,697 posts, read 61,763,427 times
Reputation: 14093
Here's my little crop. Tomatoes, Peppers, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Eggplant.

6 1/2" of rain in June. 24" on the year. 7 days near 91°F and no rain and I'm "starting" to see the stress. I watered once but that 6" that fell in June...is gone.. It doesnt sit and puddle underground...The heat and dryness evaporated everything down to about 7" now. We need 2" of rain a week to keep a healthy crop here without watering & temps in the 90s..

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