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Old 07-15-2012, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wavehunter007 View Post
Living along the coast all of my life, tropical cylones always seemed to be the biggest threat. I used to keep a record of both new and old photos of past events. Then there were a few twisters, heat waves, snows, cold waves and droughts to round things out. Here are a few on my drive:
Tropical cyclones may be your biggest threat, but the non-tropical coastal storms have to be my favorite coastal event, though hurricanes can bring some good stuff too when they graze by. Sometimes you can even get both in combination - Hurricane Ida morphed into a nor'easter in 2009. I may be an interior dweller and would like to stay that way, but it's during storms and nor'easters that the coast really shines.

Any weather enthusiast would have to have some appreciation for a classic beast like this . And a fan of winter and strong storms would love it (if they were west of the snow line that is):

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Old 07-15-2012, 11:12 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Great thread!

Snow in Nice (very unusual):





Hong Kong in June 2008 - as much as 400mm of rain fell on one day for a total of 1300mm in the month!



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Old 07-15-2012, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patricius Maximus View Post
From the same month (April 2011), this storm was a nice one. It struck the Northeast on April 1, 2011, and provided Maine with a good dumping and provided everyone else with a nice, almost classic Spring snow:
April Fools Storm. We sure got fooled here.

Looking at that map for this storm didnt get me excited because I got just drizzle here near the coast with snow/sleet mixed in. It was memorable for me because it was such a bust. In April you have to get extremely lucky to get snow this way. I was in the rain/mix part on that map. But when I say "mix" I mean visually seeing a couple of sleet pellets and flakes. Upstate CT got a a little but yeah, Maine got a ton.

In fact, I had started a thread for this storm. April 1, 2011 Major Winter Storm

First post should say it all. NWS issued a Winter Storm Warning for 5-10" around me. I got Zero.

3 Reasons why.
1. There were at least three competing upper-level systems, not one.
2. The cold air mass became stale therefore not feeding fresh cold air into the system
3. The storm did not deepen off Virginia, instead it waited until it was off of Long Island before it started to deepen and thats why Maine got it bad.
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Old 07-16-2012, 07:50 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 8,366,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patricius Maximus View Post
Tropical cyclones may be your biggest threat, but the non-tropical coastal storms have to be my favorite coastal event, though hurricanes can bring some good stuff too when they graze by. Sometimes you can even get both in combination - Hurricane Ida morphed into a nor'easter in 2009. I may be an interior dweller and would like to stay that way, but it's during storms and nor'easters that the coast really shines.

Any weather enthusiast would have to have some appreciation for a classic beast like this . And a fan of winter and strong storms would love it (if they were west of the snow line that is):
True.

However, I've always thought that storms of historic proportions should be game changers – meaning they are so severe, so devastating, that they actually change the communities that they affect forever. While non-tropical (or mid latitude storms) can be significant, they really are not in this class. I have lived between the Tri-State area (NYC/NJ/CT) and south Florida all my life, and tropical cyclones are really the only storms have changed the communities they hit forever. I saw things in tropical cyclones, both before and after, that a noreaster or snowstorm could never do. I was in South Dade County a week after Andrew hit, it was just jaw dropping, and I remember seeing a 50 foot boat - stuck between two trees 25 feet off the ground - in the tidal marsh commiunties after Hugo. I look at it like a classic movie or sports legend…these events left their mark for a long time...or forever.

Look down through history;

The Great 1926 Miami Hurricane ended the 1920’s building boom in south Florida and many say was one of the catalysts that lead to the Great Depression. The dead were burned in open fires for weeks after the storm. The last wide spread cases of malaria in the United States were the result of the 1926 Miami Hurricane.

The 1935 Florida Keys Hurricane (200 mph winds) swept away whole communities, schools; churches, business – and families were swept into the sea and never seen again.

The 1938 tropical cyclone that struck Long Island, southern Connecticut, and Rhode Island, changed the summer structure of the beach communities forever. The 1938 Hurricane leveled one of a kind mansions built on Long Island (including the original Astor mansion in Westhampton, Long Island), and end of the 140 year regain of Savin Rock (and amusement park near New Haven, CT). To this day, there are ruins along the coast near the Connecticut/Rhode Island state line of a community called Napatree Point. The 1938 cyclone swept the whole beachside community out to sea (including 100 people) and nothing was ever seen again.

Hurricane Hazel in 1954 swept away areas of North Carolina to such a degree – no one really knows how many were killed.

Hurricane Hugo (1989) and Hurricane Andrew (1992) so fully and completely destroyed parts of the area they hit, that some of the communities they hit were abandoned. There are areas in the Low Country of South Carolina and areas of south Dade Country that are empty to this day since the life changing storms.

Northeasters and snowstorms don’t do things like those mentioned above, thankfully.

Read this short but powerful recap of the 1938 Hurricane and its impact on Long Island, Connecticut and Rhode Island. It’s hard to believe it ever really happened to was so bad.

HURRICANE OF 1938

Last edited by wavehunter007; 07-16-2012 at 09:13 AM..
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Old 07-18-2012, 10:34 PM
 
360 posts, read 818,053 times
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Severe weather always keep my family on high alert. It is not really the potential damage to our property as much as it is when will dad ever come home. I work for a telephone company as a repairman and as an "essential" employee we are usually worked like crazy after various weather events. In my 15 years with the company I have been sent to Amarillo, Midland, El Paso, Houston, Brownsville, San Antonio, Oklahoma City and McAllen Texas to participate in storm restoration work. As of now my record of days worked in a row is 91. That is 91 days straight of at least 10 hours a day. My longest duration working away from home was after Hurricane Ike in Houston where we worked 8 weeks away from our families. I have a few photos of what we deal with.



















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Old 09-22-2012, 04:30 PM
 
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Default Duluth Halloween Storm 1991

So we have an early bit of snow in Duluth,Mn. It reminds me of the great Halloween storm of 1991 in Duluth. Anyone remember it or have pictures? I was living there and remember a calm trick or treat evening and snow gently falling. The next day had strong winds and very heavy snow. Seems we got a couple feet.
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Old 09-22-2012, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
66,168 posts, read 48,339,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdcdguy View Post
So we have an early bit of snow in Duluth,Mn. It reminds me of the great Halloween storm of 1991 in Duluth. Anyone remember it or have pictures? I was living there and remember a calm trick or treat evening and snow gently falling. The next day had strong winds and very heavy snow. Seems we got a couple feet.
Doing a quick research, How INTERESTING! Not only was there a blizzard there but there was a NorEaster on the East coast. I dont think I ever seen 2 big storms like that so close.

Here's a Wiki Image. Look closely at the OBSs there. Teens and 20s.

The 540 line had dropped all the way to New Mexico/Utah border!

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Old 09-23-2012, 05:33 AM
 
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Wow, didn't know about the Noreaster either. Course, we were all hunkered down up there. That low was just far enough to pull in enough cold air. Amazing cold for that early. Good research Cam!
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Old 09-23-2012, 05:52 AM
 
1,320 posts, read 3,086,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patricius Maximus View Post
Tropical cyclones may be your biggest threat, but the non-tropical coastal storms have to be my favorite coastal event, though hurricanes can bring some good stuff too when they graze by. Sometimes you can even get both in combination - Hurricane Ida morphed into a nor'easter in 2009. I may be an interior dweller and would like to stay that way, but it's during storms and nor'easters that the coast really shines.

Any weather enthusiast would have to have some appreciation for a classic beast like this . And a fan of winter and strong storms would love it (if they were west of the snow line that is):
I love this kind of setup. Keeps all the snow to my east!
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Old 09-23-2012, 01:12 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,839 posts, read 40,242,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post

The 540 line had dropped all the way to New Mexico/Utah border!
What does that mean exactly? Many times weather maps are posted and I'm not completely sure what to make of them. Might be an interesting thread. For example, what does a 500 mb temperature map tell us? 850 mb? A pressure height map?
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