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Old 09-21-2014, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Castlederp
9,268 posts, read 5,529,440 times
Reputation: 2895

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
25 June 2007.

[youtube]OZ5SQ3sSfWY[/youtube]





It was pretty bad, but in retrospect we got lucky - the River Aire has gotten close to a severe flooding incident several times over the past 10 years.

This is what the Environment Agency think could happen if we don't get flood defences:

[youtube]1F_nfyTZbbc[/youtube]
The summers of 2007 and 2008 are best left back in distant memory and forgotten about
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Old 09-21-2014, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Central Louisiana
4,203 posts, read 2,979,778 times
Reputation: 902
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagogeorge View Post
September 2008 floods in Chicago and Midwest






This was my neighborhood in 2008 when I lived in Chicago (Albany Park)



and here is some pictures of the school where I teach during the floods which actually forced us out for 8 weeks due to asbestos exposure when the flood waters bubbled up the floor tiles

[IMG][/IMG]


water coming through the door on the first floor....













and me trying to teach out of a makeshift classroom in another school
My area also experienced severe flooding in September 2008 (due to Hurricane Gustav). One location reported 21 inches of rain.

Gustav went up to your area as well, but it looks like the remnants of Ike caused much of the flooding you experienced.



The news station in Alexandria.




Last edited by ral31; 09-21-2014 at 08:49 PM..
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Old 09-22-2014, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Groningen, Netherlands
122 posts, read 127,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rozenn View Post
Similar to the Groundhog day blizzard pic, here's a photo of the 1979 Schneekatastrophe in northern Germany:


Zeitenwende und Bewusstsein: Das weisse Chaos - Die Schneekatastrophe 1978-1979
That was epic, the blizzards of 1979 (especially the one on February 14) also hit northern Netherlands very hard.

Two pics:





It was incredible. As a child, it was Paradise.
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Old 09-23-2014, 03:40 AM
 
Location: Bremerhaven, NW Germany
2,723 posts, read 2,206,170 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erka View Post
That was epic, the blizzards of 1979 (especially the one on February 14) also hit northern Netherlands very hard.

Two pics:





It was incredible. As a child, it was Paradise.
That must have been amazing. I was born a year after that and the largest snowcover i have ever experienced here was in December 2010 when we had up to 20 cm on the ground and well over a 30 cm in drifts. The winters of 1986 and 1987 were quite snowy here as well, but the 90s had very little snow here.
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Old 09-23-2014, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
2,761 posts, read 2,286,122 times
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Who can forget the 1993 Super Storm????

Superstorm of 1993


The 1993 Superstorm moved across the densely populated easternportion of the nation, with around 40% of the population of the United States directly affected by the storm. Upwards of 10 million electrical customers lost service due to the storm. An event summary from the National Climatic Data Center records the following death toll by state:

Florida: 44
Alabama: 16
Tennessee: 14
South Carolina: 1
Georgia: 15
North Carolina: 19
Kentucky: 5
Virginia: 13
West Virginia: 4
Maryland: 3
Pennsylvania: 49
New York: 23
Maine: 2

Every major airport on the U.S. East Coast was closed at one point by the storm. The volume of water dropped by the storm was immense: 44,000,000 acre-feet. (enough water to flood 44 million acres of land one foot deep) The volume of snow dropped by the Superstorm was computed at just under 13 cubic miles.










Who can forget the epic old school Weather Channel maps as well?!?! LOL!!!







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Old 09-23-2014, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Groningen, Netherlands
122 posts, read 127,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The East Frisian View Post
That must have been amazing. I was born a year after that and the largest snowcover i have ever experienced here was in December 2010 when we had up to 20 cm on the ground and well over a 30 cm in drifts. The winters of 1986 and 1987 were quite snowy here as well, but the 90s had very little snow here.
I was 4 back then. It was certainly amazing. I have never ever seen such society-disturbing weather again. Remember 1985 and 1987 as very cold. Including the legendary January 14, 1987 where Dutch weather service advised everybody to stay inside because it was too cold (windchill of about -30 C in the northeast, coldest windchill ever recorded in NL). December 2010 we also had 20 cm.

We had heavy snowfall on March 2, 2005. 40cm in one day in my street and up to 50 cm in Friesland province. That was also amazing, because it was in one day with no wind. Don't know if it affected northern Germany as well. Most of the time our winter weather is the same as in northern Germany because winter weather always comes from the east here.
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Old 09-24-2014, 11:40 AM
 
3,578 posts, read 2,858,405 times
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25th january 1942




If you froze the last few weeks, it's nothing compared to how people felt at the 25 to 30 January 1942, when it was generally 25-35 degrees cold in southern Sweden. Almost all stations south of Vanersborg Orebro Gävle was in operation then its cold records for January from these days (from 1901 onwards). On 25 January, -28.2 ° Stockholm, Gothenburg and Visby -26.0 ° -25.0 °. The 26 had Lessebo and Ogestad, both in Småland, -38.0 °. The 27 reported Jonkoping -33.0 °, -34.0 ° Växjö, Oskarshamn -38.0 °, -26.2 ° Halmstad and Örebro -29.6 °. The 28 listed Kalmar -31.0 ° and 30 had Gävle -30.0 °. Malmö's lowest temperature during these days was -28.0 °. The 25-26 blew it even gale winds of 15-20 m / s, which for Stockholm, Gothenburg and Visby part corresponds to a cooling capacity of 45-50 degrees below zero.
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Old 09-24-2014, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Trondheim, Norway - 63 N
3,142 posts, read 1,721,735 times
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Norway:
Nyttårsorkanen (The New Years Hurricane) in the early hours of January 1th 1992. This hurricane had the strongest winds ever recorded in meteorological history in Norway. It hit roughly from Sognefjorden (61 N) and north to Helgeland (65 N).

The sustained wind speed reached 162 km /h, while gusts were up to 235 km /h, even 270 km/h on the Statfjord B oil rig. A hurricane this strength is expected once every 200 years in this area according to Norwegian meteorogists.
29,000 buildings sustained damage. Incredibly, no deaths during the hurricane, but several were killed in accidents when clearing up after the hurricane (trees falling over etc).
Image: Norwegian Meteorological Institute; time: 04:00 January 1, 1992.

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Old 09-26-2014, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
66,194 posts, read 48,384,748 times
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Last hurricane to hit this area directly was Gloria.

Bob made landfall in Rhode Island
Sandy made landfall in NJ.
Irene was a Tropical Storm

https://twitter.com/NWSNewYorkNY/sta...170435/photo/1



I remember Gloria very well. I was only 11 but I remember going outside watching the wind then I got excited because the eye was about to come over the area so when it did I grabbed my bike and went around the block. Debris everywhere. Then like half hour later the rain and wind started again. We lost power.
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Old 09-27-2014, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 17,880,024 times
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29 July 2010, the largest intra-Scandinavian temp differences I've seen:
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