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Old 07-14-2012, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
66,180 posts, read 48,352,938 times
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Maybe we can use this thread to discuss past events of weather of all kinds.

Whether its an anniversary, a memory, a favorite, a bust, or a historic event; I think this should be fun for all. I'd be interested in seeing some from around the world too. I'd Also love to hear personal thoughts and experiences with events..

I'll go first... Of course, the historic & memorable October 29, 2011.

All models agreed 3-4 days out.



Actual Surface pressure map



Radar View



Some snow totals



Connecticut Power Outages. Notice the total customers without power.



Here you can see the tree split from the weight of snow and the Halloween decorations. Which was cancelled in many towns across the state. Mostly because power outages & damage was so widespread.

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Old 07-15-2012, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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December 2010 in the UK - second coldest December on record, coldest for 100 years - snowiest for 50 years in some locations, coldest on record locally - coldest Christmas on record




























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Old 07-15-2012, 01:02 AM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
10,841 posts, read 7,053,162 times
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Summer 1976, one of the best summers on record.

Jan-Sep precipitation 1976.

Jan 76: 13.9mm
Feb: 21.1mm
Mar: 11.3mm
Apr: 9.9mm
May: 19.3mm
Jun: 6.3mm
Jul: 15.4mm
Aug: 16.4mm
Sep: 96.6mm

That was coupled with average daytime temperatures above 25C/77F for 3 months, including a 10 day spell where highs averaged 33C/91F, and 16 consecutive days above 31C/88F.


River Thames near Kew.


Hyde Park Corner.


Reservoir near Heathrow Airport.
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Old 07-15-2012, 01:51 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,106 posts, read 9,785,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
Summer 1976, one of the best summers on record.

Jan-Sep precipitation 1976.

Jan 76: 13.9mm
Feb: 21.1mm
Mar: 11.3mm
Apr: 9.9mm
May: 19.3mm
Jun: 6.3mm
Jul: 15.4mm
Aug: 16.4mm
Sep: 96.6mm

That was coupled with average daytime temperatures above 25C/77F for 3 months, including a 10 day spell where highs averaged 33C/91F, and 16 consecutive days above 31C/88F.


River Thames near Kew.


Hyde Park Corner.


Reservoir near Heathrow Airport.
Wow, I wonder how people in the UK were coping then with that heat. Two solid weeks over 88F is pretty amazing given the latitude. Would have been fun to be there during that time.
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Old 07-15-2012, 02:08 AM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
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The 16 days above 31C was during the height of the heatwave, in late June/early July. During this spell, somewhere in the UK was above 90F on each of these days.

June
23rd: 31C / 88F
24th: 31C / 88F
25th: 33C / 91F
26th: 35C / 95F
27th: 34C / 94F
28th: 34C / 94F
29th: 31C / 88F
30th: 31C / 88F

July
1st: 31C / 88F
2nd: 33C / 91F
3rd: 34C / 93F
4th: 33C / 91F
5th: 33C / 91F
6th: 33C / 91F
7th: 32C / 90F
8th: 31C / 88F

Average high temperatures for the summer months
June: 25.5C / 77.9F
July: 26.5C / 79.7F
August: 25.1C / 77.2F
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Old 07-15-2012, 02:47 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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In 1976 water taps were set up in streets due to drought. It's kind of hard not to cope.. you're not just going to shut down, lol
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Old 07-15-2012, 05:12 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
66,180 posts, read 48,352,938 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Wow, I wonder how people in the UK were coping then with that heat. Two solid weeks over 88F is pretty amazing given the latitude. Would have been fun to be there during that time.
Its about the same lattidue as Labrador Canada or Edmonton Canada. Given the normal high for the Northern Tip of Maine in U.S is mid 70s in summer, that is pretty impressive.
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Old 07-15-2012, 09:10 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Great idea!

Living along the coast all of my life, tropical cylones always seemed to be the biggest threat. I used to keep a record of both new and old photos of past events. Then there were a few twisters, heat waves, snows, cold waves and droughts to round things out. Here are a few on my drive:

Hurricane Floyd in 1999. At the time of this sat pic, Floyd was one of the largest and most intense tropical cyclones ever observed - sustined winds 160 - mph (gusts 210 Mph, pressure 27.15 in). The whole US East Coast was threatened (100 million people!). In the end Floyd missed most of the East Coast and came into North Carolina as a much weaker storm.




The 1938 tropical cyclone that struck Long Island, Connecticut, and Rhode Island was long considered the worst storm of any kind to strike the region in the last 300 years:


Rhode Island coast:



Storm surge along the Connecticut eastern coastline after the 1938 hurricane. Tides were estimated at 20 feet abve sea level, carrying debris 10 miles inland. 600 were killed :


New London Harbour, CT after the 1938 cyclone:


The beaches in Rhode Island after the 1938 Hurricane:







Coastline of Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. 300 were killed here:



Hurricane Charley in Florida in 2004:



Moore/Bridge Creek twister in 1999. Doppler clocked winds of 278-mph:




....
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Old 07-15-2012, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
5,595 posts, read 6,145,140 times
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Awesome stuff. Trying to get a handle on historical weather events and stories is a sub-hobby of mine.

I just have web snapshots available now, but these should prove interesting.

Below is one of Accuweather.com's bogus forecasts. It didn't pan out, but just check that nighttime forecast out - 33F with an inch of rain and 43 mph winds would have been awesome . At those temperatures there could have even been a stray snowflake mixing in with the wind-driven rain. There's even a 24% chance of thunder.



Here's a GFS model run showing, among other things, a foot of snow in Kentucky on December 2, 2011. That didn't pan out and that run showed by far the heaviest totals, but that would have been historic for so early in the season. Coming off of the Cyber Monday snowstorm, some snow-lovers in those areas would think they hit the jackpot after getting an additional 5 inches from this storm:



And who isn't fond of seeing monster snow totals on real forecast maps ? That's why this map from TWC for the High Plains Blizzard last December has a special place in my archives. Just gaze with envy at that big area of pink and purple:



This is an incredible TWC map, showing the infrared satellite imagery from the historic Patriots Day Storm of 2011. Those cloud tops were so cold it almost scared me when I saw it. Up to that point I had never seen anything of that magnitude outside of the tropics, much less over such a large area. The only other time I've ever seen that was during the Super Outbreak of 2011 that same month.

That orange over northern Michigan was occurring while it was snowing, and over many areas there was a huge thunder and snow storm. Towards the south there was a strong cold front with three or four strong derechos which knocked out power to many people. If you look at some local forecast videos you will see a strong and continuous squall line that stretched from the Gulf Coast all the way up to Lake Superior where it was snowing. I had never seen before or since a squall line like that, and I've found no historical precedent outside of possibly some storms I read about in the late 19th century.

Severe thunderstorm warnings were issued for Michigan when temperatures were in the mid 30's, and that huge deep red puff over Chicago signifying huge convection? It was in the upper 30's at the time there. The view I have gained over the years was proven in this event - heat or even warmth is not needed for even severe thunderstorms, all you need is instability, which can either be provided by heat or a strong storm system.

Although few besides myself would label it "historic", it is an almost-forgotten weather event that I'd rank in the top 10 for the entire year:



Below is an image from the same storm on the at around the same time. This is one of my favorite thundersnow snapshots because you can clearly see all the lightning strikes beyond the snow line in Wisconsin and Michigan. There was also an outbreak of thundersnow in Iowa the previous morning.



Green Bay was Ground Zero for lightning strikes beyond the snow line, and this amazing snapshot was taken at the same time. It's not often that you see "32, Heavy Snow with Thunder" on a weather report:



From the same month (April 2011), this storm was a nice one. It struck the Northeast on April 1, 2011, and provided Maine with a good dumping and provided everyone else with a nice, almost classic Spring snow:



This is a more recent one (June 29 2012). I took this snapshot after I glanced at Google Earth and saw that Smyrna, Tennessee was at 113F. That set a new all-time record high for that location, and for a few hours on the following day (when they got up to 111F) Smyrna was the hottest place on the face of the planet:



Tennessee being the world's hot spot is quite rare.

Below is a special snapshot from March 2012, of a heavy snow forecast for Lake Tahoe :



Lastly, this is a classic case of what I christened "the deathly plume of mugginess" that all too often envelops a bubble centered around the Eastern part of the United States, and often (especially in "Spring") forms a plume-like configuration. The only really strange thing about it is that this snapshot was taken on March 15, during the huge heat wave that occurred in March 2012:

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Old 07-15-2012, 09:49 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
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^I remember it snowing most of the day April 1, 2011. Good day! The end of March 2011 also had a nice chilly end.
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