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Old 02-25-2019, 09:07 PM
 
Location: plano
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I'm warm natured. I wear shorts comfortable down to 50 degrees with thpical winds of up to 10 mph. I'm not cold out in these conditions and have played .any a round of golf in it. So out for four hours this way

Cold to me is when it's below 20 degrees with same with ds above. I like winter's here in North Texas. Keep thermostat on 67. So never cold indoors even in shorts.

Humidity here is lower than in Houston where I lived before here. I felt comfortable in Houston in same conditions as here. We visit NM mountains and with typical sunny day and winds like here I can ski down to 20 degrees no priblem. Even not in multiple layers and heavy duty ski wear.
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Old 02-26-2019, 03:58 AM
 
Location: Caverns measureless to man...
7,435 posts, read 5,367,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randomguy1234 View Post
-10 to 0°C warm? Absolute rubbish, so you'd wear shorts and a t-shirt at -10°C? -10 to 0 is freezing, below -10°C is bitterly cold. Only 16-20°C is warm!
I frequently do, although not for long periods of time. We had a lunar eclipse here a few weeks back, and the temperature that night was in the single digits above zero Fahrenheit... so, what.... about -12 to -14C, right? But there was no wind at all, so when I was out looking at the moon, I just wore gym shorts and a T-shirt. I'm not going to call it warm, but I was fine. I only stayed out about 10 minutes at a time, but I was perfectly comfortable. I did wear shoes a couple of the times I went out, though.

And as far as 0C is concerned... I wouldn't call it warm, but it's very comfortable. Again, tonight I had a late dinner, around midnight. I had a steak, a baked potato, and a bowl of peas. As is my practice, I ate on my porch so I could watch the stars and the moon and hear the nightsounds. It was in the mid-20s F, so around -3 or -4C. It took me about 20 minutes to finish my dinner, and again I was perfectly comfortable in just my gym shorts and T-shirt.

To answer the OP, objectively speaking I would call anything below 40F cold. I know it's cold, I feel the cold, but it's not uncomfortable. I don't start to get uncomfortably cold until it gets well below 0F, and honestly, once winter gets thoroughly underway, temperatures in the 30s or even 20s F do actually feel warm.

I think it's just a matter of what you're accustomed to. We all have our own internal thermostats, and everyone's is different. I remember a few years ago when I was out in LA for the Oscars, and I was staying a block off the beach in Santa Monica. It was about 50F, maybe a little less. I was sitting on a short concrete wall lacing up my rollerblades one day, wearing shorts and a T-shirt, and right next me was a small Hispanic man preparing for a bike ride. He zipped up his winter parka, pulled his stocking cap down over his ears, wrapped his muffler tightly around his face, pulled on his mittens, and off he went. I skated along behind him for a half mile or so, and I think both of us were perfectly comfortable dressed as we were.
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Old 02-26-2019, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Bidford-on-Avon, England
2,413 posts, read 601,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. In-Between View Post
I frequently do, although not for long periods of time. We had a lunar eclipse here a few weeks back, and the temperature that night was in the single digits above zero Fahrenheit... so, what.... about -12 to -14C, right? But there was no wind at all, so when I was out looking at the moon, I just wore gym shorts and a T-shirt. I'm not going to call it warm, but I was fine. I only stayed out about 10 minutes at a time, but I was perfectly comfortable. I did wear shoes a couple of the times I went out, though.

And as far as 0C is concerned... I wouldn't call it warm, but it's very comfortable. Again, tonight I had a late dinner, around midnight. I had a steak, a baked potato, and a bowl of peas. As is my practice, I ate on my porch so I could watch the stars and the moon and hear the nightsounds. It was in the mid-20s F, so around -3 or -4C. It took me about 20 minutes to finish my dinner, and again I was perfectly comfortable in just my gym shorts and T-shirt.

To answer the OP, objectively speaking I would call anything below 40F cold. I know it's cold, I feel the cold, but it's not uncomfortable. I don't start to get uncomfortably cold until it gets well below 0F, and honestly, once winter gets thoroughly underway, temperatures in the 30s or even 20s F do actually feel warm.

I think it's just a matter of what you're accustomed to. We all have our own internal thermostats, and everyone's is different. I remember a few years ago when I was out in LA for the Oscars, and I was staying a block off the beach in Santa Monica. It was about 50F, maybe a little less. I was sitting on a short concrete wall lacing up my rollerblades one day, wearing shorts and a T-shirt, and right next me was a small Hispanic man preparing for a bike ride. He zipped up his winter parka, pulled his stocking cap down over his ears, wrapped his muffler tightly around his face, pulled on his mittens, and off he went. I skated along behind him for a half mile or so, and I think both of us were perfectly comfortable dressed as we were.
If you wear shorts and a t-shirt at -10 then it’s obviously warm.
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Old 02-26-2019, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Caverns measureless to man...
7,435 posts, read 5,367,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randomguy1234 View Post
If you wear shorts and a t-shirt at -10 then it’s obviously warm.
I wouldn't call it warm - just a temperature range that's comfortable for me. Terms like "cold" and "warm" or "hot" are not necessarily always synonymous with "comfortable" and "uncomfortable." When I'm sitting outside wearing shorts, I'm aware that it's cold, but I feel completely comfortable, and am not shivering or anything. Just sitting on the porch.

Conversely, on the other end of the scale, I begin to get uncomfortable very early on. Anything above 25C, I'm starting to become uncomfortable. At 30C, I'm very, very uncomfortable, and anything over 35C is utterly horrid. I can't tolerate it at all. I'm in hell. It's not at all uncommon for me to become physically ill at those temperatures; if the humidity is high, I'm unable to function outdoors for very long.

And 40C? Someone please just shoot me in the head and get it over with. Or, just save the price of a bullet and wait 10 minutes for me to spontaneously explode in flames and self-incinerate.
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Old 02-26-2019, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Bidford-on-Avon, England
2,413 posts, read 601,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. In-Between View Post
I wouldn't call it warm - just a temperature range that's comfortable for me. Terms like "cold" and "warm" or "hot" are not necessarily always synonymous with "comfortable" and "uncomfortable." When I'm sitting outside wearing shorts, I'm aware that it's cold, but I feel completely comfortable, and am not shivering or anything. Just sitting on the porch.

Conversely, on the other end of the scale, I begin to get uncomfortable very early on. Anything above 25C, I'm starting to become uncomfortable. At 30C, I'm very, very uncomfortable, and anything over 35C is utterly horrid. I can't tolerate it at all. I'm in hell. It's not at all uncommon for me to become physically ill at those temperatures; if the humidity is high, I'm unable to function outdoors for very long.

And 40C? Someone please just shoot me in the head and get it over with. Or, just save the price of a bullet and wait 10 minutes for me to spontaneously explode in flames and self-incinerate.
Cold and shorts don't go together. If you think its cold then why not wear a hat, scarf and gloves?
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Old 02-26-2019, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Caverns measureless to man...
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Originally Posted by Randomguy1234 View Post
Cold and shorts don't go together. If you think its cold then why not wear a hat, scarf and gloves?
Because as I said, "cold" and "uncomfortable" are not necessarily synonymous. Objectively, of course it's cold, but comfort is subjective. That's a temperature range that I'm very, very comfortable in.

My wife has a metabolic disorder, and needs the house very warm - at least 25C. I can't tolerate that sometimes, especially if I'm doing a lot of housework. I often have to go outside to cool down for a few minutes, before I go back into that very uncomfortable 25C house. Wearing a hat and gloves would defeat the purpose, and I don't think I've ever worn a scarf in my life. Come to think of it, I don't even know where my hat and gloves are - haven't seen them in a couple of years, but I'm sure they're around someplace. Probably buried with the sweaters.

I can't help wondering if part of the difference between us is geographical. You live in England, right? Aren't your winters rather damp? I live in the center of the US, in a mid-continental climate. Winters here are very, very dry. I wonder if that's a factor, because I know that when the temperature is 0C here and the airmass is damp and foggy, I feel much colder than I do in very dry air at -10C. Where I live, the colder it is the dryer it is, usually. In January, our normal humidity is comparable to that of the Sahara Desert. The air may be cold, but it doesn't conduct heat away from your body the way it does when it's damp.
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Old 02-26-2019, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Bidford-on-Avon, England
2,413 posts, read 601,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. In-Between View Post
Because as I said, "cold" and "uncomfortable" are not necessarily synonymous. Objectively, of course it's cold, but comfort is subjective. That's a temperature range that I'm very, very comfortable in.

My wife has a metabolic disorder, and needs the house very warm - at least 25C. I can't tolerate that sometimes, especially if I'm doing a lot of housework. I often have to go outside to cool down for a few minutes, before I go back into that very uncomfortable 25C house. Wearing a hat and gloves would defeat the purpose, and I don't think I've ever worn a scarf in my life. Come to think of it, I don't even know where my hat and gloves are - haven't seen them in a couple of years, but I'm sure they're around someplace. Probably buried with the sweaters.

I can't help wondering if part of the difference between us is geographical. You live in England, right? Aren't your winters rather damp? I live in the center of the US, in a mid-continental climate. Winters here are very, very dry. I wonder if that's a factor, because I know that when the temperature is 0C here and the airmass is damp and foggy, I feel much colder than I do in very dry air at -10C. Where I live, the colder it is the dryer it is, usually. In January, our normal humidity is comparable to that of the Sahara Desert. The air may be cold, but it doesn't conduct heat away from your body the way it does when it's damp.
Usually it is very humid in winter. Last few days were the exception. 19% min humidity here yesterday and it was 9.7% at Great Dun Fell. And it has been warm and sunny, even hot in parts of Wales and the south east of England.
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Old 02-27-2019, 03:54 PM
 
2 posts, read 533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WellShoneMoon View Post
I don't see it as an absolute, as in a certain temperature that I would call "cold." I see it as relative, as in "Too cold to _____."

For me, anything below 75 degrees is too cold to go swimming. (I'm a Floridian.) 60 degrees is too cold to go outside without a jacket or sweat shirt on. 40 degrees is too cold to go outside without a coat, scarf, and gloves. Below freezing is too cold to go outside, period.
I notice a lot of trends in tolerance depending on region, at least in the us. The Californians or Floridans seem to have the lowest tolerance, as it doesn’t get that high or low in those regions.
People in Texas and such are tough, as it gets very hot there.
I, personally am a Minnesotan, and this is how it is for me:

200 plus: (only have experience from sauna) reduced to shorts and t shirt.
120: can’t go about in normal tweed suit anymore.
90: a bit hot
80:warm
70 to 50: balmy
40 to 20: perfect
10: have to put on a coat over suit
-10:throw in a furry hat
-40 below, put on thorough arctic grade gear, with one breathable layer to cover your whole body, thermal shirt and pants, winter boots as well as a balaclava with a hat and goggles, plus a good heavy winter coat and snow pants.
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Old 02-27-2019, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Bidford-on-Avon, England
2,413 posts, read 601,858 times
Reputation: 263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tannahill View Post
I notice a lot of trends in tolerance depending on region, at least in the us. The Californians or Floridans seem to have the lowest tolerance, as it doesn’t get that high or low in those regions.
People in Texas and such are tough, as it gets very hot there.
I, personally am a Minnesotan, and this is how it is for me:

200 plus: (only have experience from sauna) reduced to shorts and t shirt.
120: can’t go about in normal tweed suit anymore.
90: a bit hot
80:warm
70 to 50: balmy
40 to 20: perfect
10: have to put on a coat over suit
-10:throw in a furry hat
-40 below, put on thorough arctic grade gear, with one breathable layer to cover your whole body, thermal shirt and pants, winter boots as well as a balaclava with a hat and goggles, plus a good heavy winter coat and snow pants.
80 is hot not warm. 90 is scorching not a bit hot. 10°F is well below the coat threshold, that would be 10°C. -10°F is well below hat weather, that would be 41°F.
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