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Old 03-10-2013, 12:42 AM
 
6,791 posts, read 7,487,848 times
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I don't mind cold weather until it dips below freezing, thankfully that doesn't happen too often in SE Michigan, we usually stay in the 30's (F) or higher. I feel very comfortable going outside for walks when the temp is 35-45 degrees. I don't mind wearing a coat, I'd much rather do that then be hot, heat is my enemy, the South will never be for me, at least not in the summer.

I have zero tolerance for cold in the early morning though, mornings are torture for me in the best of circumstances. I used to live in San Diego and I would be absolutely miserable, and feel like I was freezing while going to work in the morning during winter, but it probably never went below 60 degrees. I live in MI now, but I don't work in the mornings anymore, so I don't mind the cold much at all. It's interesting how much tolerance can vary between people and circumstances.
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Old 03-10-2013, 01:08 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,674 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdriannaSmiling View Post
WOW! What an insight...

20 F to you probably feels the same way 70 F to people here as I consider 70 F to be the threshold for "balmy" in winter.
20 F to me felt "WOW- it's cold- this is.......different..." I deliberately exhaled the whole time I walked around just so I could watch my breathe puff in front of me........"
I can see you rolling your eyes and LOLing as you read this
You were experiencing a sensation you have never personally experienced before, so of course, you're gonna react to it. It would be like trying to explain the concept of color to someone who is congenitally blind. You can talk about different colors all you want, but one has to experience sight to understand what it is.
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Old 03-10-2013, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
5,593 posts, read 6,948,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdriannaSmiling View Post
WOW! What an insight...

20 F to you probably feels the same way 70 F to people here as I consider 70 F to be the threshold for "balmy" in winter.
Assuming sunny and dry weather, for the record most of the time 20F is ordinarily cold for me, though it often feels balmy after long periods of colder weather. I've felt balmy to some degree in conditions as cold as 0F, but I think 30F or 40F is where true balminess kicks in. That's when the air is chilly, but I feel hot, but never uncomfortably so, and I can feel the water from the melting icicles hit my skin*.

Probably your 70F is more directly comparable to my 30F or 40F as opposed to 20F. The differences are remarkable in any case.

Quote:
20 F to me felt "WOW- it's cold- this is.......different..." I deliberately exhaled the whole time I walked around just so I could watch my breathe puff in front of me........"
I can see you rolling your eyes and LOLing as you read this
I'm not rolling my eyes. When it drops below 0F I have a similar feeling, though to a much lesser degree. The differing varieties of cold produce sensations that are quite different. Ordinary cold is different from bitter cold, which in turn is different from brutal cold.

*Only the drippings. Being doused in icewater would never feel good (well, at any temperature under 90F anyway).
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Old 03-10-2013, 10:59 AM
 
Location: HERE
2,055 posts, read 3,233,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patricius Maximus View Post

I'm not rolling my eyes. When it drops below 0F I have a similar feeling, though to a much lesser degree. The differing varieties of cold produce sensations that are quite different. Ordinary cold is different from bitter cold, which in turn is different from brutal cold.

*Only the drippings. Being doused in icewater would never feel good (well, at any temperature under 90F anyway).
I would define bitter or brutal cold as in "OMG- I can't stand it- gotta get out of here ASAP"- only time a felt this is when I jumped into 50-55 degree water with air temps in the 70s- literally could not stay in the water for for a minute- swam immediately to shore and warmed myself with towels and shivered for a bit.

So it's ironic that my experience with intolerable cold was in air temps higher than room temp!
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Old 03-10-2013, 11:22 AM
 
Location: HERE
2,055 posts, read 3,233,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClownFishAreAdorable View Post
You were experiencing a sensation you have never personally experienced before, so of course, you're gonna react to it. It would be like trying to explain the concept of color to someone who is congenitally blind. You can talk about different colors all you want, but one has to experience sight to understand what it is.
Well....... that's kinda really stretching it- even someone from the deep tropics has a fridge/freezer would have touched cold air before and have some concept of cold while a completely blind person (born blind with no prior experience w/ sight) would have NO concept of appearance or color and their entire perception of objects is based on touch. However, feeling the cold wind blowing against my face was a new experience and very energizing in the context of the euphoria of my first solo vacation ever (so nice to follow my own agenda when exploring/sightseeing) and seeing NYC is something I've been wanting to do since I was 10. Chose a week in winter on purpose although family and friends advised me to wait til May.

Also, for the record,I have experienced snow before in family trips to Lake Tahoe but it was in the low 40s there during the day- only got down into the 15-20 range at night- went sledding, built snowman, tried skiing once as a kid- didn't like it. Went up there w friends and tried snowboarding in march 2012- didn't like that either-so the rest of trip i spent the next day tubing and walking around. At night we hit the casinos- since we were all finally old enough to gamble..

Will up to Tahoe w friends again next weekend- forecast is for 45 degree weather but still snow will b on the ground

Last edited by AdriannaSmiling; 03-10-2013 at 12:51 PM..
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Old 03-10-2013, 12:32 PM
 
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I live in the NE and cold to me is 50 degrees and below.
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Old 03-10-2013, 12:53 PM
 
Location: HERE
2,055 posts, read 3,233,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zack Morris View Post
I live in the NE and cold to me is 50 degrees and below.
Zack Morris as in "Saved By the Bell"??? How's Kelly?
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Old 03-10-2013, 01:03 PM
 
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It is difficult to say. You have to factor in wind and humidity.
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Old 03-10-2013, 01:33 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
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Well the water here in the summer is 55. I can cope in that. But in newfoundland its like 8c so that would be worse.
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Old 03-10-2013, 02:36 PM
 
Location: CT
1,215 posts, read 2,265,980 times
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I don't feel like it's really cold until it's below 20F, but I don't find that at all unbearable. Before that it's chilly. 40F feels cool, upper 70s is warm and 80 is getting hot. Upper 80s and 90 is when I consider that it is actually hot, still not to say unbearable.
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