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Old 05-29-2016, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CairoCanadian View Post
Though not as strong a trend, it's also a pattern in much of subtropical Australia, especially when you look at the number of rainy days:

Albury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Albury is a Mediterranean climate with oceanic influence (or vice versa). It's hardly humid subtropical. Look at how dry the summers are, humidity-wise.

Whilst slightly Csa influenced, these are also Cfa's that have wetter winters or at least drier summers:

Girona, Spain
Avignon, France
Toulouse, France
Lyon, France

These were the Adriatic sea Cfa examples (that you probably thought of):

Rimini, Italy
Split, Croatia
Kotor, Montenegro
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Old 05-30-2016, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Central Louisiana
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Here, we get high amounts of precip during the winter months (with higher total averages than summer months). Still there are usually a good number of sunny days as well. Rain occurs about 8-10 days per month on average during winter.
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Old 05-30-2016, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Lexington, KY
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No, I prefer summer to be wettest.
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Old 06-01-2016, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
Albury is a Mediterranean climate with oceanic influence (or vice versa). It's hardly humid subtropical. Look at how dry the summers are, humidity-wise.
Oops, I misread Albury as Albany (a cool maritime-influenced Mediterranean climate in WA). How complacent of me.

Yes, Albury is humid subtropical. But not a generic one. It's still a bit Med influenced, like those Cfa's in the Adriatic sea.

These are also Cfa climate with wetter winters, albeit on a semi-arid/Med borderline:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wagga_Wagga#Climate
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wangaratta#Climate

Last edited by Ethereal; 06-01-2016 at 02:39 AM..
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Old 06-01-2016, 02:05 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
Oops, I read Albury as Albany, which is a cool maritime-influenced Mediterranean climate in WA. How complacent of me.

Yes, Albury is humid subtropical. But not a generic one. It's still a bit Med influenced, like those Cfa's in the Adriatic sea.

This also a Cfa climate with wetter winters, but it's Med/Semi-arid influenced:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wagga_Wagga#Climate
Clutching at straws there I think. Albury's 40% increase in winter rainfall isn't a Mediterranean influence. Wagga Wagga has an even lower increase, with winter only 20% wetter than summer - an almost non existent difference

My climate gets a 100% increase and it's not considered even remotely Mediterranean

Last edited by Joe90; 06-01-2016 at 02:15 AM..
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Old 06-01-2016, 03:03 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
Clutching at straws there I think. Albury's 40% increase in winter rainfall isn't a Mediterranean influence. Wagga Wagga has an even lower increase, with winter only 20% wetter than summer - an almost non existent difference

My climate gets a 100% increase and it's not considered even remotely Mediterranean
Well, technically, you're right. But determining a Med climate is more complicated than that.

By "Med influence", I meant that they have summers with rather low humidity or at least a month or two where rainfall is at around 40mm (if not lower), in contrast to their wetter winters (60mm+). Your climate (judging from Wiki) seems to be moderately humid all year round with equally distributed rainfall.

Nelson's second climate box (what you're referring to?) has a rather irregular rainfall pattern (perhaps because it only recorded 12 years of data). So, June gets 125mm whilst February gets 36mm. At the same time, July is drier than December by 60mm? If anything, it's like a Med climate gone wrong or something. At least my "Med influenced" climates have a slightly pronounced drier summer, wetter winter pattern, no?

I personally use the relative humidity as a criteria in determining what climates are Med-influenced and what are not. Yes, I am aware that the Mediterranean itself is very humid, but their virtually rainless summers do make up for it.

Incidentally, I've always been baffled by Bendigo's climate (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bendigo#Climate). Is it a transitional Med/Semi-arid climate, since it sees two summer months with rainfall below 40mm? It cannot be oceanic because the summers are too hot (mean is at 22C). And it does seem too dry for Cfa. I don't know...
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Old 03-09-2019, 09:54 PM
 
1,306 posts, read 396,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gordo View Post
Is it just me or is anyone else annoyed by the lack of Humid Subtropical climates with a rainy winter as oppose to a rainy summer. I don't like Mediterranean Climate summers because these rarely have warm summer lows and afternoon convectional shower or thundershower activity, even thought I do like how the winters are the main wet season. I've found a few examples of places I want on the eastern shores of the Black Sea and Adriatic Sea but otherwise I'm not finding many like examples.
The entire Gulf Coast from Houston to Northern Florida, while having summer as their rainiest season, have winters that are almost as rainy.
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Old 03-10-2019, 07:49 AM
 
236 posts, read 39,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
Well, technically, you're right. But determining a Med climate is more complicated than that.

By "Med influence", I meant that they have summers with rather low humidity or at least a month or two where rainfall is at around 40mm (if not lower), in contrast to their wetter winters (60mm+). Your climate (judging from Wiki) seems to be moderately humid all year round with equally distributed rainfall.

Nelson's second climate box (what you're referring to?) has a rather irregular rainfall pattern (perhaps because it only recorded 12 years of data). So, June gets 125mm whilst February gets 36mm. At the same time, July is drier than December by 60mm? If anything, it's like a Med climate gone wrong or something. At least my "Med influenced" climates have a slightly pronounced drier summer, wetter winter pattern, no?

I personally use the relative humidity as a criteria in determining what climates are Med-influenced and what are not. Yes, I am aware that the Mediterranean itself is very humid, but their virtually rainless summers do make up for it.

Incidentally, I've always been baffled by Bendigo's climate (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bendigo#Climate). Is it a transitional Med/Semi-arid climate, since it sees two summer months with rainfall below 40mm? It cannot be oceanic because the summers are too hot (mean is at 22C). And it does seem too dry for Cfa. I don't know...
Mediterranean climates can be pretty humid year-round even during their dry summers, if we're talking about relative humidity. Eg "humid" New York is less humid than Cape Town, even though Cape Town receives little rain in summer. People may perceive them as lower humidity because they see clear skies and lack of rain.
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Old 03-10-2019, 08:07 AM
 
19 posts, read 2,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gordo View Post
Is it just me or is anyone else annoyed by the lack of Humid Subtropical climates with a rainy winter as oppose to a rainy summer. I don't like Mediterranean Climate summers because these rarely have warm summer lows and afternoon convectional shower or thundershower activity, even thought I do like how the winters are the main wet season. I've found a few examples of places I want on the eastern shores of the Black Sea and Adriatic Sea but otherwise I'm not finding many like examples.
The original coastal Med climates (Mediterranean Basin) have really warm summer lows.

Somewhere around 21-23 celsius, some up to 24C. Nights without A/C are terrible.
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Old 03-10-2019, 11:15 AM
 
236 posts, read 39,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
Well, technically, you're right. But determining a Med climate is more complicated than that.

By "Med influence", I meant that they have summers with rather low humidity or at least a month or two where rainfall is at around 40mm (if not lower), in contrast to their wetter winters (60mm+). Your climate (judging from Wiki) seems to be moderately humid all year round with equally distributed rainfall.

Nelson's second climate box (what you're referring to?) has a rather irregular rainfall pattern (perhaps because it only recorded 12 years of data). So, June gets 125mm whilst February gets 36mm. At the same time, July is drier than December by 60mm? If anything, it's like a Med climate gone wrong or something. At least my "Med influenced" climates have a slightly pronounced drier summer, wetter winter pattern, no?

I personally use the relative humidity as a criteria in determining what climates are Med-influenced and what are not. Yes, I am aware that the Mediterranean itself is very humid, but their virtually rainless summers do make up for it.

Incidentally, I've always been baffled by Bendigo's climate (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bendigo#Climate). Is it a transitional Med/Semi-arid climate, since it sees two summer months with rainfall below 40mm? It cannot be oceanic because the summers are too hot (mean is at 22C). And it does seem too dry for Cfa. I don't know...
The best way to determine the influences of a marginal climate like Bendigo is surely to look at what climates it borders geographically. Bendigo seems to be on the Cfa/Cfb border, but pretty close to Bsk and not too far from Csb. So really it's a climate with a number of influences, which is why it confuses you. But yes, being on the Cfb border one of the main influences is oceanic.
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