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Old 03-10-2019, 02:13 PM
 
438 posts, read 99,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wildcat15 View Post
No, I prefer summer to be wettest.
Summer rain is better because it minimizes drawbacks. In the summer, rain is relief from the heat, not to mention the chance at an exciting show. But in winter, the rain is hours - weeks of dank overcast that compounds the gloominess. And, in places that freeze, the rainfall is wasted.
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Old 03-10-2019, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Sheffield, England
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My fave subtropical is the Cwa, or dry mild sunny winters with hot humid thundery monsoonal summers.
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Old 03-10-2019, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
Well, technically, you're right. But determining a Med climate is more complicated than that.

By "Med influence", I meant that they have summers with rather low humidity or at least a month or two where rainfall is at around 40mm (if not lower), in contrast to their wetter winters (60mm+). Your climate (judging from Wiki) seems to be moderately humid all year round with equally distributed rainfall.

Nelson's second climate box (what you're referring to?) has a rather irregular rainfall pattern (perhaps because it only recorded 12 years of data). So, June gets 125mm whilst February gets 36mm. At the same time, July is drier than December by 60mm? If anything, it's like a Med climate gone wrong or something. At least my "Med influenced" climates have a slightly pronounced drier summer, wetter winter pattern, no?
The 12 years of data highlights a typical Cfb feature, which is variability of rainfall -there was about 700mm of rainfall here last Jan/Feb, while Jan/Feb this year had around 9mm.

The description of Cfb climates having even rainfall year round, isn't entirely accurate - it just means that compared to other C climates, there isn't a typical seasonal bias.

Motueka's rainfall distribution is different to Nelson as a long term average, by having a very distinct drying trend

Last edited by Joe90; 03-10-2019 at 06:08 PM..
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Old 03-10-2019, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
The 12 years of data highlights a typical Cfb feature, which is variability of rainfall -there was about 700mm of rainfall here last Jan/Feb, while Jan/Feb this year had around 9mm.

The description of Cfb climates having even rainfall year round, isn't entirely accurate - it just means that compared to other C climates, there isn't a typical seasonal bias.

Motueka's rainfall distribution is different to Nelson as a long term average, by having a very distinct drying trend
For Riwaka long-term, driest 3-month season has 62% of the rainfall of the wettest one. For Mapua it's 70% and Nelson Aero 78%. Ophir scores 50% and Ashburton 91%.
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Old 03-14-2019, 08:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrappyJoe View Post
Summer rain is better because it minimizes drawbacks. In the summer, rain is relief from the heat, not to mention the chance at an exciting show. But in winter, the rain is hours - weeks of dank overcast that compounds the gloominess. And, in places that freeze, the rainfall is wasted.
Except Southern California. LA doesn't rain in July but with a high around 85, and it rains in February but still has 60F.
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Old 03-15-2019, 06:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zerence24 View Post
Except Southern California. LA doesn't rain in July but with a high around 85, and it rains in February but still has 60F.
I'm aware that frostless Med climates like SoCal benefit from winter rain. But many places outside these warm Med subtropics (often at higher latitudes) see freezing temps that kill vegetation, meaning that any rain is all for naught. Not to mention that the winter rain storms in these colder areas can get very long, drawn out for weeks.
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Old 03-15-2019, 08:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrappyJoe View Post
I'm aware that frostless Med climates like SoCal benefit from winter rain. But many places outside these warm Med subtropics (often at higher latitudes) see freezing temps that kill vegetation, meaning that any rain is all for naught. Not to mention that the winter rain storms in these colder areas can get very long, drawn out for weeks.
Yes it is, including San Francisco, just slightly warmer than London in winter.
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Old 03-16-2019, 11:31 AM
 
Location: SE Michigan
637 posts, read 357,820 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrappyJoe View Post
I'm aware that frostless Med climates like SoCal benefit from winter rain. But many places outside these warm Med subtropics (often at higher latitudes) see freezing temps that kill vegetation, meaning that any rain is all for naught. Not to mention that the winter rain storms in these colder areas can get very long, drawn out for weeks.
Most places that get a lot of rain in winter don't freeze enough in winter to kill vegetation, or certainly not all vegetation.
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Old 03-16-2019, 12:00 PM
 
438 posts, read 99,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unobtainium View Post
Most places that get a lot of rain in winter don't freeze enough in winter to kill vegetation, or certainly not all vegetation.
When I say "kill," I'm referring to dormancy. The plants are still alive, but they aren't actively growing. As a result, the rainwater doesn't get used up, and instead ponds, gets mucky, etc. The only benefit is groundwater recharge.
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Old 03-16-2019, 03:03 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
637 posts, read 357,820 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrappyJoe View Post
When I say "kill," I'm referring to dormancy. The plants are still alive, but they aren't actively growing. As a result, the rainwater doesn't get used up, and instead ponds, gets mucky, etc. The only benefit is groundwater recharge.
I see what you're saying, but not everything goes dormant either. In fact the opposite can happen. In the PNW, the cliffside behind my grandparents house comes alive with green in the winter. Green ferns, green grass, all very lush. Lasts from Octoberish to late May, the rest of the year it's all shriveled up. And that's with winter highs in the mid-40s.
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