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Old 08-27-2013, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Edmonton, Canada
1,674 posts, read 908,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by koyaanisqatsi1 View Post
As I've repeatedly said before, it purely comes down to "trolling" acclimatisation my love so don't sit there on your high horse and tell us what we can/can't feel
Ridiculous. 20C by definition is not icy. Please show us some pictures of all the frozen water from your neck of the woods.

And I find it hard to believe that someone from Sydney would find your current temperatures cold since you're just about to record your warmest ever winter!

Winter records melt for Sydney
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Old 08-27-2013, 02:57 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
20,695 posts, read 18,578,689 times
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Everyone should just put him on ignore if he is going to call 20c 'icy' when it is impossible to be 'icy' at that temp.

Incase he did not notice water freezes at 0c.
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Old 08-27-2013, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
15,869 posts, read 12,438,182 times
Reputation: 5055
I can relate to the "icy" comment a bit. Any wind here below about 10C and with with lower dew points, feels a lot icier than northerlies(off the sea) with higher dewpoints. This morning was typical, about 5C, sunny and with a steady SE breeze. It had the sort of feel that people would call a cutting wind. That doesn't really happen with higher humidities.
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Old 08-27-2013, 03:46 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
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But it isn't icy though it's cool and 20c is not one bit cool. Sorry but 20c does not happen in places that get a winter.
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Old 08-27-2013, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
15,869 posts, read 12,438,182 times
Reputation: 5055
Icy is a commonly used term, even if it isn't below OC. You've used the term boiling, so should understand.

Looking at Sydney's climate stats, the usual culprit (low RH) is fairly evident in the morning. I think it could be described as a biting wind.
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Old 08-27-2013, 04:07 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
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Yea but it isn't icy if it isn't icy. Simple as.
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Old 08-27-2013, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Edmonton, Canada
1,674 posts, read 908,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
I can relate to the "icy" comment a bit. Any wind here below about 10C and with with lower dew points, feels a lot icier than northerlies(off the sea) with higher dewpoints. This morning was typical, about 5C, sunny and with a steady SE breeze. It had the sort of feel that people would call a cutting wind. That doesn't really happen with higher humidities.
I actually find cold winds with higher humidity worse than dry winds.

Why Does Humidity Make You Feel Colder In Lower Temperatures?

But the main point is Sydney has not been cold this winter.
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Old 08-27-2013, 04:16 PM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
10,824 posts, read 6,906,830 times
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The atmospheric pressure in Sydney must be ridiculously high.

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Old 08-27-2013, 04:19 PM
 
Location: York
6,504 posts, read 4,235,062 times
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Joe isn't saying its icy, he's saying its a commonly used term, just like someone saying 30C is boiling.
In the UK, when people say icy, it usually is icy. BUT, when people say boiling (which an awful lot of people do say when the temp goes above 28C or so) it most certainly isn't.

We all do it one way or another, particularly in mild Oceanic climates like ours.
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Old 08-27-2013, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Edmonton, Canada
1,674 posts, read 908,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dean york View Post
Joe isn't saying its icy, he's saying its a commonly used term, just like someone saying 30C is boiling.
In the UK, when people say icy, it usually is icy. BUT, when people say boiling (which an awful lot of people do say when the temp goes above 28C or so) it most certainly isn't.

We all do it one way or another, particularly in mild Oceanic climates like ours.
Certainly the weather in Sydney is not objectively icy. And unless the dude is from Darwin or Singapore or some such the weather in Sydney also not subjectively icy. Either way, it's not icy.
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