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View Poll Results: What temperature range is necessary for a climate to have 4 seasons?
0-5C 1 3.70%
5-10C 4 14.81%
10-15C 6 22.22%
15-20C 5 18.52%
20-25C 6 22.22%
greater than 25C 5 18.52%
Voters: 27. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-16-2013, 02:12 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
I'm not saying 74F feels hotter here than it does there, but I would say that 74F is in the range for severe sun burn in a short time (7 minutes in the extreme). Would you say the same of where you are? On a day with that temp, most people seem to prefer shade to sun, and while I'm not sure how UVI effects heat sensation, the reason most people seek shade at low temps (74F) is because the sensation is unpleasant, and I think that is the result of a clearer atmosphere. There does seem to be articles on the net suggesting the same.
Temperatures doesn't affect sunburn, only UV amount, which is turned based on sun angle, clarity of sky (ozone layer, less water vapor in intervening troposphere, cloud amounts).
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Old 08-16-2013, 02:13 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
I'm not saying 74F feels hotter here than it does there, but I would say that 74F is in the range for severe sun burn in a short time (7 minutes in the extreme). Would you say the same of where you are?
Seven minutes?! That seems impossibly short. What UV index is that? Even if very high, that sounds unrealistic.
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Old 08-16-2013, 02:15 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I've gone skiing in Vermont in winter and have been sunburned. I have black hair, brown eyes and am not what you would consider "fair skinned".
Snow will actually increase the UV amount, as some reflects back. Snow in midsummer can be nasty. With clear skies, not just high UV, but extreme glare.
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Old 08-16-2013, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Seven minutes?! That seems impossibly short. What UV index is that? Even if very high, that sounds unrealistic.
15 - which is the highest for here. A burn time index was once used in NZ, bus was discontinued a few years ago. I think that highlights the difference, when it is bad, that's all it will take for some people to burn.

In relation to your first post, think of it this way -would 23C be warm enough to make you seek shade? I'm not saying it's like that all the time, but it often is and I don't think it's UV related, just clearer skies.
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Old 08-16-2013, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Finland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagogeorge View Post
Speaking of UV Index:
Good to know those figures. The requirement of using sun cream is definitely a bad thing when choosing climates.
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Old 08-16-2013, 02:40 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagogeorge View Post
The only Americans who would think 20C high temps in are summer-like live on the tip of San Francisco Bay (and only on the tip because if you go 30km inland the temps are 10C warmer in the summer), and coastal Alaska (the interior actually gets much warmer).
Add parts of the Pacific Northwest. Maybe still below average, but not that far off from summer. Coastal Southern California, too. Immediately by the coast, at least:

SANTA MONICA PIER, CALIFORNIA - Climate Summary

Southern California isn't a four season climate in any real sense.
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Old 08-16-2013, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
15 - which is the highest for here. A burn time index was once used in NZ, bus was discontinued a few years ago. I think that highlights the difference, when it is bad, that's all it will take for some people to burn.

In relation to your first post, think of it this way -would 23C be warm enough to make you seek shade? I'm not saying it's like that all the time, but it often is and I don't think it's UV related, just clearer skies.
74f in march here can feel pretty hot, but it is more related I think to the temp regime my body has adjusted to after winter. I'm curious why you would think the sun felt underwhelming in Australia when I would think their pollution levels would be similar to yours, unless you meant cause of dust from the deserts there.
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Old 08-16-2013, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
74f in march here can feel pretty hot, but it is more related I think to the temp regime my body has adjusted to after winter. I'm curious why you would think the sun felt underwhelming in Australia when I would think their pollution levels would be similar to yours, unless you meant cause of dust from the deserts there.
74F in itself doesn't feel hot to me, just nice. What I'm getting at, is that at times, it's very unpleasant for most people to sit in the sun at that temperature (or even less), the sensation is very unpleasant, and in my experience, it's very common for people from overseas, to comment on the disconnect between the temperature and the sun sensation.

Underwhelming probably wasn't the right word. At times (usually after rain) it could feel absolutely baking. But in general, my time in SA, Vic and NSW, the sun just didn't seem an issue and I don't ever recall getting sunburned and this is from someone who spent all my time outdoors in some hot places.

Dust is what I mean by pollution, I think that in general, the skies where I was would have contained far more particles than coastal areas, although low humidity could possibly counter that.
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Old 08-16-2013, 03:32 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
15 - which is the highest for here. A burn time index was once used in NZ, bus was discontinued a few years ago. I think that highlights the difference, when it is bad, that's all it will take for some people to burn.
I think the burn time is for rather fair skinned people who burn more easily than tan, so it's a bit misleading. Also, once you develop a tan, your burn time will increase. A UV index of 15 is very high, though.

Quote:
In relation to your first post, think of it this way -would 23C be warm enough to make you seek shade? I'm not saying it's like that all the time, but it often is and I don't think it's UV related, just clearer skies.
With the sun nearly overhead, maybe, but it's not that hot. Otherwise, no. I'm assuming the dew point is not close to the temperature.
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Old 08-16-2013, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I think the burn time is for rather fair skinned people who burn more easily than tan, so it's a bit misleading. Also, once you develop a tan, your burn time will increase. A UV index of 15 is very high, though.



With the sun nearly overhead, maybe, but it's not that hot. Otherwise, no. I'm assuming the dew point is not close to the temperature.
I see that the US has used the burn time guide in different places at different times and used the same criteria - fair skinned people. It's not meant to be misleading, but in NZ was considered to give false security, particularly with longer burn times (15 minutes+).

Dewpoints are high here in summer. A 23C maximum (the summer average) would typically have dewpoints of 10-15C, only reaching 18-20C a few times during summer.
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