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View Poll Results: What temperature range is necessary for a climate to have 4 seasons?
0-5C 1 3.70%
5-10C 4 14.81%
10-15C 6 22.22%
15-20C 5 18.52%
20-25C 6 22.22%
greater than 25C 5 18.52%
Voters: 27. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-13-2013, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
So Brisbane is a 4 season climate, but somewhere like Paris or Warsaw is a 2 season climate? ..... okaaaay.

I don't think much of a difference is needed at all. There is only a 10C/20F seasonal difference here, but obvious differences between seasons.
Uh, Warsaw's climate is humid continental and I said humid continental climates qualify as 4 season climates.

Paris' fall and winter seem to run together and their spring and summer do too. Their summer is not truly "hot" except for short periods and their winter is indistinguisable from their fall.

Brisbane almost qualifies as a tropical monsoonal climate. Cairns, just up the coast does so you're cherry picking a city right on the cusp of the climate transitional zones.

Go out to Warwick a ways from the coast and you'll get a true 4 season climate.
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Old 08-13-2013, 09:52 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caleb Yeung View Post
I hate it when people say that. Delhi is a hot steppe, get the facts.
LOL A hot steppe? Don't you mean savannah
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Old 08-13-2013, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Kharkiv, Ukraine
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I'd say that four season climate is a climate with winter average below freezing and summer highs above 20C.
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Old 08-13-2013, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Uh, Warsaw's climate is humid continental and I said humid continental climates qualify as 4 season climates.

Paris' fall and winter seem to run together and their spring and summer do too. Their summer is not truly "hot" except for short periods and their winter is indistinguisable from their fall.

Brisbane almost qualifies as a tropical monsoonal climate. Cairns, just up the coast does so you're cherry picking a city right on the cusp of the climate transitional zones.

Go out to Warwick a ways from the coast and you'll get a true 4 season climate.
So Warwick, with it's smaller range than Paris, is more of a 4 season climate? and Brisbane doesn't qualify because it's almost not humid subtropical? - how about Coff's Harbour, firmly Humid subtropical and with a seasonal range of only 10C/20F, is that more of a 4 season climate than Berlin at 19C/38F?

I don't need to Cherry pick, to show the obvious flaws in your argument. I think you are buying into the "season-less Oceanic climate" notion, just a little too readily. I guess you're using Koppen's Humid Subtropical definition, that's sure to mean big inconsistencies.
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Old 08-13-2013, 11:03 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
In wet-dry tropical climates, deciduous trees lose their leaves in the dry season. In wet tropical climates they lose them in the fall or spring and then blossom right away.

Any subarctic climate really is a 2 season climate, winter and a spring like summer.
A Med climate is a 2 season climate, summer (dry) and winter (wet).
Marine west coast is a 2 season cliamte similar to a Med but with a longer winter.

Humid subtropical and humid continental are really the only climates with 4 seasons, possibly the colder steppes as well.
Oceanic climates are not two season climates in my opinion certainly not. Seattle, London, Paris, Amsterdam and Christchurch are most definitely four season climates maybe not on par has the lights of Toronto or Warsaw but still a four season climate.

Last edited by P London; 08-13-2013 at 11:44 AM..
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Old 08-13-2013, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Finland
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A 20C mean temp variation between the coldest and the warmest months, with the mean being below 3C during the coldest one, and above 15C in the warmest.
The mean temp must be above 100% of the coldest and -100% of the warmest at least during four months during the year.

I think this formula is quite good.

According to this, Paris has a 3 season climate, while Warsaw has all 4 seasons.
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Old 08-13-2013, 04:28 PM
Status: "Soon I'll hear old winter's song.." (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Saint Paul, MN
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I don't think the actual range matters so much. You can have a climate where the summers are 120 and the winters are 60. That's a big range but I wouldn't call it 4 seasons at all. You can also have a climate where summers are 46 and winters are -70. Also not 4 seasons. It's more on what temperatures there are during the months.
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Old 08-13-2013, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Paris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
Paris' fall and winter seem to run together and their spring and summer do too.
How so, since fall is warmer than spring? Btw, there's no dry season here, so it's not like a mediterranean climate with a longer wet season. In Paris, the wettest months are in late spring/early summer, while late winter/early spring is the driest part of the year.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
A 20C mean temp variation between the coldest and the warmest months, with the mean being below 3C during the coldest one, and above 15C in the warmest.
The mean temp must be above 100% of the coldest and -100% of the warmest at least during four months during the year.

I think this formula is quite good.

According to this, Paris has a 3 season climate, while Warsaw has all 4 seasons.
I agree with this. To me the likes of London, Paris, Brussels, Bordeaux or Lyon have a fall, a spring and a summer (albeit a weak one in the first 3), but not a "real" winter.
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Old 08-13-2013, 05:12 PM
 
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I would say as long as a place has at least a couple weeks of real cold ("real" cold meaning snow and at least a couple days that fail to top freezing) and at least a couple weeks of real heat ("real" heat being some 90F+ dog days) it should qualify as a four-season climate generally speaking.

Though northern Florida might fit this criteria and I definitely wouldn't say it's a true 4 season climate so there are exceptions.
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Old 08-14-2013, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
3,738 posts, read 6,219,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdriannaSmiling View Post
Around 10-15 C is absolute minimum with a preference for more variation. Places like Delhi or Barrow, Alaskd don't qualify because summer highs are above 20 C and the average winter highs are less than 10 C. Month of subfreezing averages not required though but should go below freezing at night on a regular basis. Washington D.C. and Seattle are both definitely four season climates, even though snow is not consistent in either and the average winter temperature is above freezing every month.
"Winter" nights in Seattle do NOT regularly go below freezing, despite the average lows being so close. I don't consider Seattle to have an actual real winter. Most years it doesn't even snow and when it does it is usually weak. Only every few years do we get something substantial that lasts. Usually we just get awful, terrible cold rain.
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