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View Poll Results: Which Extreme Summer/Winter would you prefer?
Very Hot Summer / Very Cold Winter 19 25.00%
Very Cold Summer / Very Hot Winter 2 2.63%
Warm Summer / Cool Winter 35 46.05%
Cool Summer / Warm Winter 20 26.32%
Voters: 76. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-13-2013, 09:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
Not by your standards, but London is mid-latitude and has those averages.
Ok, London is at the upper end mid latitude. Florida is also "mid latitude", but at the lower end.... More importantly London is completely oceanic.





Most mid latitude locations have much warmer summers and much colder winters.
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Old 08-13-2013, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagogeorge View Post
Ok, London is at the upper end mid latitude. Florida is also "mid latitude", but at the lower end.... More importantly London is completely oceanic.





Most mid latitude locations have much warmer summers and much colder winters.

Depends on which hemisphere. In the southern hemisphere, it's the opposite. Oceanic climates dominate.

Here is one of the colder southern hemisphere cities at your latitude and is somewhat inland and at elevation.

San Carlos de Bariloche - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-13-2013, 09:50 PM
 
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Well, there is more land in the Northern Hemisphere, and the mid latitudes are dominated by continental climates. Even the Southern Hemispheric mid latitudes also are NOT dominated by oceanic climates





If anything most oceanic climates are in the Northern Hemisphere.
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Old 08-13-2013, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagogeorge View Post
Well, there is more land in the Northern Hemisphere, and the mid latitudes are dominated by continental climates. Even the Southern Hemispheric mid latitudes also are NOT dominated by oceanic climates





If anything most oceanic climates are in the Northern Hemisphere.

I consider anything over an ocean as having an oceanic climate. In that sense, the southern hemisphere is dominated by oceanic climates since a larger percentage is covered by water than the northern hemisphere.
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Old 08-13-2013, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
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NYC's current averages:

Jan: 39F / 27F
Jul: 85F / 70F

Cooler winter/Warmer summer:
(5F)

Jan: 34F / 22F - I couldn't
Jul: 90F / 75F - July 2010? (91/75)

(30F)
Jan: 9F / -3F - I'm sure this is illegal
Jul: 115F / 100F - tell me more

Warmer winter/Cooler summer:
(5F)
Jan: 44F / 32F - December anyone? :/
Jul: 80F / 65F - putrid

(30F)
Jan: 69F / 57F - let the tropical debating begin (lol not really)
Jul: 55F / 30F - I'd die

I'd rather take the mixed bag winters and above average summers we've been receiving for the last few years over any of these options. But if I HAD to choose, option #3 would suit me best.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagogeorge View Post
Ok, London is at the upper end mid latitude. Florida is also "mid latitude", but at the lower end.... More importantly London is completely oceanic.

Most mid latitude locations have much warmer summers and much colder winters.
Wouldn't the vast majority of Florida be at the higher end of the lower latitudes? The 30N line is around Jacksonville.
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Old 08-13-2013, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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I would lessen the seasonal temperature variation for Vancouver

Current averages
Jan: 7C
Jul: 22C

For 5C increments

Jan: 2C - too cold
Jul: 27C - very nice

Jan: 12C - not bad
Jul: 17C - not nice but I could live with it

Jan: 17C - pretty decent
Jul: 12C - horrible
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Old 08-13-2013, 10:42 PM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post

Lets say a 5C increment for the lowest effect, we get the following:

Jan: 3C - far too cold
Jul: 29C - good

Jan: 13C - good
Jul: 19C - terrible
Now for the extreme version, a 13C swing.

Jan: -5C - just about the worst thing that could ever happen.
Jul: 37C - not great

Jan: 21C - poor for summer, good for winter.
Jul: 11C - dire, unless it's now winter and London is in the SH.
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Old 08-13-2013, 10:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
Jan: -5C - just about the worst thing that could ever happen.
A very good solid winter max. Deep winter definitely. Should not last more then a couple of months.

Quote:
Jul: 37C - not great
Pretty extreme... Even I would find uncomfortable especially if it was humid.... Last July St Louis had an average high of 37C. Suburbs of Chicago experienced this and greater back during the Dust Bowl....

Quote:
Jan: 21C - poor for summer,
A good summer's monthly low. Suicide would be contemplated if it were a summer average high.

Quote:
good for winter.
More like early May.

Quote:
Jul: 11C - dire, unless it's now winter and London is in the SH.
11C should not be mentioned in the same sentence as July.
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Old 08-13-2013, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
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I moved from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Tucson, Arizona places that have very different weather. Weather had nothing whatsoever to do with my decision to move but it has turned out to be something that, to my surprise, has improved my life.

I work at home and am in my home office most of the time. One thing I find enjoyable about doing that here is how sunny my office can be all day, every day. Quite a switch from cloudy Pittsburgh.

It's been an unusually hot summer in Arizona (my neighborhood was over 100 every single day of June) but I don't work outside, so the heat is an issue only for very short time periods. By the same token, the lack of bad weather the rest of the year is quite pleasant. We have Thanksgiving dinner outside with roses from the garden decorating the table. Even at Christmas I can usually go without a coat. In addition to the sun, I enjoy the lack of humidity. I was always miserable in humidity, even with air conditioning. In Arizona, I have to be careful with sunscreen and use a lot of moisturizer since I am very pale, but it's a reasonable trade.

Finally, when I lived back East, it never occurred to me how much time and energy I invested in preparing for and responding to bad weather. From the everyday "what do I wear ... what do I need to take with me?" to dealing with a car in frequent snow, ice, and thunderstorms (I didn't usually have a garage) those things are non-issues here. I also don't have to worry about snow on the roof, icicles on the eaves, cleaning the gutters, raking leaves, shoveling sidewalks, finding a place to park in a blizzard, walking around a city with ice-covered sidewalks, leaving for work early in the morning in response to inclement weather, or sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic jams during even minimal snow. Those are all of no concern to me anymore and it's surprisingly liberating.

I still don't think weather is the #1 reason to choose a place to live, but having experienced a real difference, I see some beauty in moving to a warming climate.
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Old 08-14-2013, 01:21 AM
 
Location: Bangkok, Thailand
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I usually prefer climates with fairly low seasonal range, but my city's climate has such a marginal summer that I can't afford to sacrifice summer warmth for a milder winter. Plus, I wouldn't mind having more frequent winter snowfall.

So I would choose a warm summer and cool winter. Under this scenario my city's climate would be similar to NYC, but with a slightly cooler, much less humid summer. I suspect the trees would be completely bare though, which I would hate.
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