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View Poll Results: What does winter mean to you?
A stable snowpack with frigid temperatures and nothing grows at all 23 29.49%
No plant growth whatsoever and snowfall is erratic and doesn't stick for more than a few days at a time 19 24.36%
A cooler season than the summer 28 35.90%
None of the above (Please Explain) 8 10.26%
Voters: 78. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-14-2013, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
15,913 posts, read 12,477,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac15 View Post
I average 50 days of frost and east england is in the same range.
It would be similar here at the same distance inland, at which you live.

I've had people from Europe and other places with cold winters, point out how heavy frost can be here. I think this is because dewpoints during the day, can be quite high at times (12-13C), followed by temperatures several degrees below freezing. This year does seem quite different though, with temps below freezing and no visible frost, happening more than usual.
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Old 08-14-2013, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
15,913 posts, read 12,477,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac15 View Post
Yes but its not the same the snow will not last long there. Its much colder here.
At 600m, that would be correct. The highest town in this region is about 600m and snow would only lie there for about 2-3 weeks at most. It does have ice skating for about 2-3 months though.
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Old 08-14-2013, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,198 posts, read 22,419,879 times
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For what it's worth, these are the stations with the highest number of air frost occurrences that I can find in the UK (excluding mountains):

Braemar 101.7
Dalwhinnie 97.2
Aviemore 88.7
Aboyne 85.9
Eskdalemuir 84.1
Tolluch Bridge 80.5
Redesdale Camp 78.9
Altnaharra 77.7
Santon Downham 76.5 (biiiig anomaly for the area)
Shap 74.5
Spadeadam 74.0
Malham Tarn 73.0

7 are in Scotland, 4 are in northern England, one is in East Anglia.
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Old 08-14-2013, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Laurentia
5,562 posts, read 6,065,849 times
Reputation: 2355
Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
I want to get a sense of how people on this forum define winter....
Minimum requirements for true winter are:

1. Snow dominates as the form of precipitation
2. Snowpack is maintained throughout the winter
3. Temperatures in the 20's and 30's most of the time
5. All plants are dormant
4. Days are short and nights are long

A really good winter will average well below freezing, and also feature lots of wind, blizzard conditions, and several bitter cold snaps, including frequent jaunts below 0F and at least some ice fog.

For a "minimum winter" there should be good sledding conditions for at least 90% of the winter. Another guideline to use is how it looks outside - if it looks like this most of the winter, you have a true winter; if it looks like this most of the winter, you don't.
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Old 08-14-2013, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,198 posts, read 22,419,879 times
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I suppose you can sum up the perceived image of winter using one Google search:

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=wi...w=1600&bih=807

You can do the same for all four seasons.
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Old 08-14-2013, 10:24 AM
 
7,497 posts, read 9,291,344 times
Reputation: 7394
Nine months of misery.
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Old 08-14-2013, 10:51 AM
 
3,578 posts, read 2,818,450 times
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some of the places with the absolute coldest winters almost doesnt have any precipitation at all during the cold season. sometimes even insufficient for snowpack to form. and no reasonable person would claim that these places doesnt have a winter.

for example:

Ulaangom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-14-2013, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
5,901 posts, read 7,962,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADGreen View Post
Dark when I leave for work, dark when I get home.
Also layered up and spending more time indoors.
I spend more time indoors in summer/spring than in winter
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Old 08-14-2013, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Estonia
1,758 posts, read 1,399,970 times
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Massive amounts of snow, frequent blizzards and cold snaps, almost constant darkness and cloud cover. Not all winters measure up but most do and they're awesome.
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Old 08-14-2013, 12:01 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,602 posts, read 21,797,274 times
Reputation: 44463
Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
So a stable snowpack or not stable?

Not many of the states have a stable snowpack. I went to college in central Massachusetts and from November through early April there was always snow on the ground - sometimes a blanket of it and sometimes patches of it. I am guessing that's not what you mean by a "snowpack".

More than we had in the suburbs of NYC, where snow would go away entirely, sometimes, and real snow usually didn't happen until late December, with few "white Christmases".

Since then I've lived in Pennsylvania and Ohio. Again, I don't think there has been a snowpack in any of those states, and we have some winters that are more snowy than others.
I'd actually prefer this stable snowpack, to a stable four of months of intermittent snow, looking at brown grass, mud, slush, a flurry, snowy rain, and repeat.

Snow is less depressing to me.
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