U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-15-2013, 09:46 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
9,686 posts, read 11,022,261 times
Reputation: 4051

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
I wouldn't use a single day's high temperature, from 3.5 years ago, to categorize an area's climate.
When you can find a high temperature of 41F in the entire climate record for a city like Honolulu or San Juan real tropical climates... let me know
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-15-2013, 10:04 PM
 
25,060 posts, read 22,159,261 times
Reputation: 11578
Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
When you can find a high temperature of 41F in the entire climate record for a city like Honolulu or San Juan real tropical climates... let me know
Just look at the USDA hardiness zones as well. Orlando's is 9b, while San Juan's is 13a. Huge difference
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2013, 10:50 PM
 
Location: Seattle
1,248 posts, read 965,141 times
Reputation: 444
Nice try, but Minnestota's Lake Superior shores are not arctic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2013, 10:57 PM
 
25,060 posts, read 22,159,261 times
Reputation: 11578
OP, your Arctic classification is way too broad. Most places in the Arctic do not average more than 10C in the warmest month outside of the Dxd zones in eastern Siberia, which are actually subarctic because their summers are so warm (around 20C). The main feature of what makes an Arctic, as opposed to a subarctic, climate, is the tundra

For the tropical part, your Seasonal classification would render those locations as desert anyway. It's not about how much it rains but how much of that rain evaporates. I would say it should be more than 35 inches, but less than 2" in the driest month, then it's more in line with a tropical savanna. Rainforest needs more rain than that, I'd say almost double the amount.

Last edited by theunbrainwashed; 08-15-2013 at 11:13 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2013, 01:20 AM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
11,295 posts, read 16,430,063 times
Reputation: 6046
Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
When you can find a high temperature of 41F in the entire climate record for a city like Honolulu or San Juan real tropical climates... let me know
I fail to see what that has to do with Orlando being a near-tropical city. And I don't understand why a higher-latitude, inland, continental city is being compared with two lower-latitude island cities. Of course Orlando, being located on a large continent, will experience a bit more volatility, weather-wise, than Honolulu and San Juan.

And the temperature difference between Orlando and San Juan in the winter months is nearly equivalent to the temperature difference between NYC and Northern Florida (Tallahassee) in the winter months, which makes it even more of a nonsensical comparison, in my opinion of course.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2013, 08:45 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,755 posts, read 39,741,424 times
Reputation: 14675
Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
When you can find a high temperature of 41F in the entire climate record for a city like Honolulu or San Juan real tropical climates... let me know
Agreed. The tropics IMO are places that are incapable of any cold. Orlando may be close, but it's not it. I'm sure some tropical plants would be very unhappy with a high of 41F.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2013, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Lincoln, NE
1,199 posts, read 1,086,480 times
Reputation: 515
Orlando has an average of 2.4 nights at 32 or below, I don't think any place with a freeze average at all is tropical.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2013, 04:22 PM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
10,824 posts, read 6,935,388 times
Reputation: 2514
So this system will misplace London and Brisbane, plus many other subtropical, oceanic and high latitude climates.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2013, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 17,581,482 times
Reputation: 11103
So I will have a dry-summer humid continental climate despite I have a wet summer-dry spring humid continental climate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2013, 04:41 PM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
10,824 posts, read 6,935,388 times
Reputation: 2514
Lol!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top