U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Where is the hottest place in Canada?
******** 5 12.50%
Lillooet 3 7.50%
Lytton 4 10.00%
Osoyoos 15 37.50%
Spences Bridge 4 10.00%
Winnipeg 9 22.50%
Voters: 40. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-23-2014, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Edmonton, Canada
1,674 posts, read 908,980 times
Reputation: 888

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by EverBlack View Post
However, this reasoning is flawed, just because not only big cities have to be taken in consideration.

Virtually any city in:

Germany, New Zealand, UK, Ireland, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Hokkaido, Netherlands, Belgium, Poland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Siberia, Belarus, Czech Republic, Kaliningrad Oblast and Austria has cooler summers than Toronto. That alone is approximately 327,000,000 (approximately 4.6% of total population).

If we add: Bogota, Lima, Mexico City, Paris, Johannesburg, Cape Town, Moscow, Saint Petersburg, Nizhny Novgorod, Kazan, Agadir and Addis Ababa we get 412,900,000 (5.9% of population... approximately, of course).

If we add some other cities (like Seattle, Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, San Diego, San Francisco, Cochabamba, Arica, Antofagasta, Nantes, Quebec City, Bilbao, Porto, A Coruña, Vigo, Le Havre, Zurich, Vladivostok, Ulan Bator and Hulunbuir) we get around 445,780,000 (6.3% of population).

This, of course, is considering only these cities. Probably it can get up even to 8-10%
Which is exactly my point! More than 90% of the people in the world live in places with summers hotter than Toronto.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EverBlack View Post
And:

1) Toronto isn't the hottest city in Canada. Osoyoos may be. And I estimate a lot more cities are cooler than Osoyoos.
2) Toronto may be demographically a bit cool (especially considering the large amount of people in hot and poor countries), but geographically it isn't (considering Antarctica, the Arctic and high plateaus).
1. I wasn't talking about Osoyoos.
2. The area of the Arctic and Antarctic is tiny compared to the tropics. And most people live in (or near) the tropics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EverBlack View Post
I'm not sure what I'm "fighting" for, this data is totally meaningless, however, we can start a new thread to continue this talk
No, it would be a very short thread as you have already proven exactly what I'm trying to say. It all started when someone said "Toronto and Montreal are still relatively hot cities on a worldscale scale". This is demonstrably false as you have just shown.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EverBlack View Post
And... I'm not sure why are you saying "I haven't got a clue", really.
That wasn't me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-23-2014, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Edmonton, Canada
1,674 posts, read 908,980 times
Reputation: 888
Quote:
Originally Posted by GM10 View Post
I am stating the major population and popular centres in the world and they all have summers that are cooler or similar to Toronto/Montreal.
This is wrong. You may as well be trying to argue that a flat Earth is at the center of a geocentric universe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-23-2014, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Vernon, British Columbia
3,018 posts, read 2,516,868 times
Reputation: 2125
Toronto is closer to the equator than it is to the north pole; therefore, it should be warmer than the average place on earth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-23-2014, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Edmonton, Canada
1,674 posts, read 908,980 times
Reputation: 888
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glacierx View Post
Toronto is closer to the equator than it is to the north pole; therefore, it should be warmer than the average place on earth.
You've fallen victim to the Mercator projection.

The Earth is not flat. Fully 40% of its surface area lies within the tropics; only 12% lies in the arctic regions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-23-2014, 11:39 PM
 
Location: Rome
342 posts, read 297,745 times
Reputation: 316
^^
And 50% of its surface area lies within the 30N - 30S parallels.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2015, 08:29 AM
 
2 posts, read 844 times
Reputation: 16
Okay, it's obvious that I will be biased. I grew up on a 160-acre farm five miles northwest of Lytton. I vividly remember reading the thermometer daily during the summer and enduring the excessive heat with absolutely NO air conditioning! I've lost count of how many days I read temperatures of 105 deg. and above!

This much I DO recall: the day I married my first husband, Richard Pittman, on July 14th, 1973, it was either 108 deg. or 109 deg. (in the shade, of course). He was wearing his Army Dress Uniform, and I was wearing a beautiful wedding gown that I bought in November---which had LONG sleeves!!! The Sts. Mary and Paul Anglican Church did NOT have a/c, the Lytton Parish Hall did NOT have a/c, nor did our cars nor our home have a/c!!!

My husband couldn't even FAKE a smile in ANY of our wedding pictures, because he was so hot and miserable! (I'm a better actor than him, so I looked delightfully happy!)

You can convert that to Celsius if you like; Canada didn't convert to metric until 1975.

All I know, is that people here in Utah are shocked when I tell them how hot the summers were where I grew up in Canada!

Seriously, it wasn't so uncommon for friends and I to encounter tourists over at the nearby cafe and gas station that were driving up (from California or points south of the border) for a skiing holiday in JUNE, before the school year was done, who did NOT understand why it was so hot, and the snow was nowhere to be found!!!

Their map of the U.S. showed Canada as being ALL WHITE, so they actually thought we were snowbound ALL YEAR LONG!!! Apparently, they didn't comprehend that it was a POLITICAL MAP, and NOT a geographical map!!! Ergo, each State of the Union was a different color, but Canada, NOT being a part of the United States, was left uncolored!!! I'd say they didn't their research very well!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2015, 09:21 AM
 
2 posts, read 844 times
Reputation: 16
On the argument about how hot Toronto/Montreal is or isn't, those involved in the debate have neglected to incorporate one very vital piece of the puzzle; humidity. Ontario (and, in fact, ANY city that has high humidity) gives a humidex reading, in addition to the temperature.

Humidity changes everything, when we're referring to how hot it feels.

I have lived in Lytton, Calgary, CFB Borden, Ontario, Midland, Ontario, Orillia, Ontario, Chilliwack and Abbotsford, British Columbia, and now Salt Lake City and American Fork, Utah.

Lytton and Utah are arid---desert areas very low in humidity. When the thermometer says it's 105 deg. it FEELS like 105 deg. Having lived in Lytton for most of my unmarried life, I can ACTUALLY nail the temperature as a 100 deg. when it reaches it, WITHOUT benefit of a thermometer.

Calgary is also arid, although I've not lived there long enough to see temperatures quite that high.

Ontario, however, is VERY Humid, owing to the amount of moisture in the air compliments of the Great Lakes---freshwater inland seas, in fact (Lake Superior even has tides!).

On July 7th, 1988, Midland, Ontario hit exactly 37 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit) with 98% HUMIDY! The temperature rose steadily throughout the week, until it topped out at about 44 degrees Celsius (if I remember correctly)! It was FAR MORE uncomfortable!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2015, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Vernon, British Columbia
3,018 posts, read 2,516,868 times
Reputation: 2125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galindalee View Post
On July 7th, 1988, Midland, Ontario hit exactly 37 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit) with 98% HUMIDY! The temperature rose steadily throughout the week, until it topped out at about 44 degrees Celsius (if I remember correctly)! It was FAR MORE uncomfortable!!!
July 1988 maxed out at 36C in Midland, Ontario. The temperature hardly ever goes above 38C/100F in Ontario, but it feels hotter because of the humidity.

In my opinion, Spences Bridge, BC is the hottest place in Canada because it has the hottest temperatures in the summer. Lytton is hot too, but gets wind coming up from the coast every few weeks that tends to moderate the temperature in between heatwaves. This coastal wind doesn't make it as far inland as Spences Bridge, hence the higher average.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-07-2015, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Washington State
15,355 posts, read 8,025,596 times
Reputation: 13159
Hot and Canada are oxymorons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top