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Old 08-24-2013, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Rimini, Emilia-Romagna, Italy (440 N)
2,672 posts, read 2,201,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sirron View Post
mar89, thanks for posting this! I am hoping to someday visit the Marche region of Italy on a vacation, and this is most helpful.

Ciao!
Ciao!
Marche is a beautiful region, I love it too
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Old 08-24-2013, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Rimini, Emilia-Romagna, Italy (440 N)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
D, winters are too mild, summers are OK but too warm and they seem kinda humid.
Yes it's always humid here!
About rainfall, summers are pretty dry with some occasional thunderstorms. But air humidity is very high all-year round: at the airport, it ranges from 73% in summer to 82% in winter, and it's higher on the beach or zones that are closer to the sea.
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Old 08-24-2013, 04:03 PM
 
273 posts, read 297,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Wow, great posts all around, thanks! Nice conversations going.

I know I mentioned Portland and that's why some of us keep comparing it. But Look at Baltimore Latitude 39.25N.
20 inches of snow annually.

But I learned something new. There are places further north in latitude that get practically no snow per year on average.

Does anyone have an annual snow map from Italy? I'm very curious how the rest of the country looks now..

Or another question would be... Is the normal snow total 0 inches further south you go on the East coast there??
At Baltimore's latitude there are also Eureka, California (less than half an inch) and Aomori, Japan (over 300 inches). Again, does this comparison have sense?
However, going south on the Adriatic coast the snowfalls tend to be slightly heavier than its northern part. Coastal cities in Abruzzo can see 20 inches of snow in a single snowstorm. You won't find a place with less than an inch of snow/year north of the Jonio Sea's shores.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Check this out. Image of the day of February 24th, 2012 of snow in Italy..
Rome, which can be seen as a gray smudge on the southwestern coast of the peninsula, recorded highs of a spring-like 50F the day this image was captured, but earlier in the month the temperatures dove as low as 26F on February 5. During that cold snap a rare intense snowfall blanketed Rome, causing the closure of the Colosseum, the Roman Forum and the Palatine Hill due to concerns of the risk of icy footing for tourists, and roads became impassible. Further north, temperatures plummeted to −21 C (−6 F) on 7 February.

On February 11, news media reported over 2 meters (6.5 feet) of snow had fallen in Urbino, a walled town situated on a high sloping hillside on the eastern side of the Apennine Mountains. That same snowfall cut access to many remote towns in the Apennines, blocking roads and trapping some people in the homes.
The snow cover of this image is lower than normal. The second half of that month was very mild and the snow fallen in the first half had already melted.
Urbino's landscape is not sloping, actually it's pretty gentle and there aren't high peaks nearby; the "stau" (orographic lift) is not as pronounced as in other areas. However, in Urbino around 11 feet of snow (more than 3 meters) fell in four days and cities like Cesena and Forl, close to the sea, were covered by 2 meters of snow. It has been a very powerful event for that area.

Last edited by Troms; 08-24-2013 at 04:19 PM..
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Old 08-24-2013, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
There's also the other Portland; Portland, OR:

PORTLAND WB CITY, OREGON - Climate Summary

46N. Mean temperatures 2F cooler than Rimini, just slightly cloudier. Winters are much wetter than Rimini, but still less snow with annual average of 3 inches. Further north (49N), Bellingham averages 4 inches.

BELLINGHAM 3 SSW, WASHINGTON - Climate Summary

Adjacent to the sea and mountains block incursion of cold air, which would have to come from the less usual (easterly) direction anyway. There's probably somewhere similarly almost snow-free in NW France or the British Isles.
That's why this forum is awesome. Always learning. I didn't know those cities average was that low. Interesting stuff! Obviously the Ski resorts and mountains average extremely higher but how about the other side of the Cascades (between the Rockies and Cascades). Do they get more because the Cascades block the warm Pacific air and maybe the cold air from the mountains dive down the slope more?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mar89 View Post
In this case (February, 2012 cold siberian wave) Rimini got snow from Feb 3rd to Feb 7th, all melted on 9th, and then again from Feb 10th to Feb 12th. A few days after the last snowfall, there was no snow on the ground, even Feb 15th or 16th, whilst snowcover lasted for more days on the coldest areas of the Emilia plains. You may note Cesena and Forl with snow on the ground. In Tuscany there was no snow at all.

The image however shows the general scheme of snow on the Po Valley: southern areas, near the Apennines (Piacenza, Parma), receive a lot of snow compared to the northern areas (Milan, Brescia), that are more sheltered from the Alps and that receive a good amount of precipitations only in case of southern winds, which may generate orographic lifting towards the Alps.

But south-eastern winds from the mediterranean cyclones which usually form on the Tyrrhenian don't affect for many days northern areas, while can affect for many days Central Italy and Emilia-Romagna. So, areas around Milan or Turin are colder than others but don't usually get much snow; on the contrary, the area along the Apennines get important snowfalls, as the Adriatic side (except for the coasts).
Thanks for this. Excellent details!
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Old 08-25-2013, 02:13 AM
 
Location: Rimini, Emilia-Romagna, Italy (440 N)
2,672 posts, read 2,201,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
That's why this forum is awesome. Always learning. I didn't know those cities average was that low. Interesting stuff! Obviously the Ski resorts and mountains average extremely higher but how about the other side of the Cascades (between the Rockies and Cascades). Do they get more because the Cascades block the warm Pacific air and maybe the cold air from the mountains dive down the slope more?



Thanks for this. Excellent details!
You're welcome.
Naturally italian climate isn't that simply as I've tried to describe due to varied orography and diverse air masses, it's a general and simplified scheme.
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Old 08-25-2013, 02:37 AM
 
Location: Rimini, Emilia-Romagna, Italy (440 N)
2,672 posts, read 2,201,151 times
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Another feature of the climate of Rimini and the Adriatic regions is "garbino" wind. Due to the rainshadow effect generated by the Apennines, while atlantic depressions approaching Italy moving eastward, we have this peculiar very dry and warm wind (a sort of Chinook or Foehn).
Strong wind gusts can affect adriatic hills and coasts, quickly rising local temperatures, all year round. Since here we usually have high humidity levels, when garbino blows we feel a bit like in the Arizona desert (just kidding).
North of Romagna, the south-eastern part of Emilia-Romagna region, the garbino is less frequent, whilst it's common from Rimini to Pescara.
As a result of this wind, for example, in the morning of March 18th, 2013, Piacenza and Parma got snowfalls and 0C, Bologna 2C and Rimini 18C! I couldn't believe that only 200 km west it was snowing!
Another examples of garbino were November 5th, 2012, when we had 24C in Rimini, and the 2009 "not-very-white" Christmas, with 20C and many people relaxing on the beach (at the same time, in Pescara there were 27C!!!).
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Old 08-25-2013, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Rimini, Emilia-Romagna, Italy (440 N)
2,672 posts, read 2,201,151 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Does anyone have an annual snow map from Italy? I'm very curious how the rest of the country looks now..
About average snowfall, the only official data are from 1921-1960.
This image shows you quite well the average snowfall in Italy:



And this is the same map, in a larger scale, of Northern Italy. Rimini is on the bottom right corner of the map. These data are very old, so more recent averages may be a bit different.

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Old 08-27-2013, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,991 posts, read 47,321,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mar89 View Post
About average snowfall, the only official data are from 1921-1960.
This image shows you quite well the average snowfall in Italy:



And this is the same map, in a larger scale, of Northern Italy. Rimini is on the bottom right corner of the map. These data are very old, so more recent averages may be a bit different.
Whoa, almost missed this thanks to so many threads pushing it back. This is beautiful. Perfect. Thanks! Wish I could give you rep points again.
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Old 08-27-2013, 10:24 AM
 
273 posts, read 297,065 times
Reputation: 175
Mar, I don't mean to be rude at all, but these maps are almost useless today. Not in the sense that snowfall averages have become lower; they're just different pretty everywhere. The maps are nice but highly imprecise, especially the first one, being the result of an interpolation from very few stations with snowfall data. They're only useful to have a general overview of the snowier and less snowier areas in Italy, but not for punctual measurements.

Last edited by Troms; 08-27-2013 at 10:36 AM..
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Old 08-27-2013, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
9,670 posts, read 10,980,156 times
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D+ I rate it better then my home city of Vancouver for the much warmer summers
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