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Old 08-28-2013, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Rimini, Emilia-Romagna, Italy (44°0 N)
2,672 posts, read 2,200,164 times
Reputation: 998

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Quote:
Originally Posted by french user View Post
No, they fit perfectly!

As well as here:
http://goo.gl/maps/F89q5
http://goo.gl/maps/Ahi0z
http://goo.gl/maps/eo4Pb
http://goo.gl/maps/XgvPg
http://goo.gl/maps/vuEWR

Or Atlantic coasts's palms: despite being labelized as "oceanic", palms those palms fit well there, in the middle with parasol pines and other "mediterranean" species as weel as decidous "oceanic" ones.
http://goo.gl/maps/MZ8gi
http://goo.gl/maps/1ApvO
http://goo.gl/maps/2Gy9a

http://goo.gl/maps/o7xSA
http://goo.gl/maps/1SU3G
I think that palms in Biarritz and Cannes fit perfectly with pines and other mediterranean species, and with the architecture too.
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Old 08-28-2013, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Near Tours, France about 47°10'N 0°25'E
2,872 posts, read 3,784,041 times
Reputation: 1863
Quote:
Originally Posted by mar89 View Post
I think that palms in Biarritz and Cannes fit perfectly with pines and other mediterranean species, and with the architecture too.
I don't know why, but the picture where is writed "biarritz" is actually in Arcachon, neae Bordeaux...not in Biarritz. it seems the last research is writed on the screen but it is not there!

I agree, the mix of Palms with parasol pines and other mediterranean species and roman tiled-architecture fits well together. In Britanny or the Loire Valley, with the slate roofs it might be an association we do not make, but since I'm used to it it seems ok to me.

In Paris I think Planting a line of palms in a street more like an excentricity than enything else...
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Old 08-28-2013, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Ohio
1,366 posts, read 1,067,606 times
Reputation: 1492
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Seems a tough line to establish where they belong and where they don't. Do these really look so out of place in Atlanta where it is very hot in the summer, and pretty mild in winter with avg highs in the 50'sF?
ATL is subtropical, but not "warm" subtropical. It has been below zero degrees F (-18C for the non-US posters) in Atlanta in the past, most recently back in '85 when it got to 8 below Fahrenheit. Single digit lows happen a couple times a decade.

Some palms can survive that, but won't look all that great. If another 1985 happens they'll be toast.

Atlanta's native vegetation consists of a bunch of deciduous trees (oaks, maples, hickories, etc) plus some pines & maybe a few broadleaf evergreens - not sure if Live Oak or Southern Magnolia are native there, but I know they can grow in Atlanta.
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Old 08-28-2013, 09:20 AM
 
1,879 posts, read 1,782,243 times
Reputation: 1450
I do like them because they do give an area a tropical feel. They make our main street look attractive. I live in a temperate area that is just below the subtropics.

I do like some more than others. Out of the ones mentioned in this guide, I like the Alexander Areca and Majestic palms.

Palm tree guide with illustrations of different types of palm trees

Where I live, the main tree is the Norfolk pine which I think is an attractive tree.

Araucaria heterophylla - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-28-2013, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Edmonton, Canada
1,674 posts, read 908,304 times
Reputation: 888
Quote:
Originally Posted by french user View Post
No, they fit perfectly!

As well as here:
http://goo.gl/maps/F89q5
http://goo.gl/maps/Ahi0z
http://goo.gl/maps/eo4Pb
http://goo.gl/maps/XgvPg
http://goo.gl/maps/vuEWR

Or Atlantic coasts's palms: despite being labelized as "oceanic", palms those palms fit well there, in the middle with parasol pines and other "mediterranean" species as weel as decidous "oceanic" ones.
http://goo.gl/maps/MZ8gi
http://goo.gl/maps/1ApvO
http://goo.gl/maps/2Gy9a

http://goo.gl/maps/o7xSA
http://goo.gl/maps/1SU3G

That might look more out of context here in Britanny, but that's mainly because it doesn't fit well with the slate architecture wich fell more "cool climate"...
http://goo.gl/maps/ntd58


Or Parisian palm trees: !
http://goo.gl/maps/cGd9a

Or one of the few Tours's palms... !
http://goo.gl/maps/SdnVW




Those palms do fit better in European shores than in the tropics, where they do not belong. Inversely, tropical palms such as coconuts would be ridiculous in Europe and mediterranean areas in general.
I think the abundance of healthy and varied palms in Cannes--together with the architecture and background scenery--make it all fit in there. In Paris though it just doesn't work. It looks like they're trying too hard.

In Europe anywhere that's along the Mediterranean is allowed to have palms, along with Portugal. Nowhere else.
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Old 08-28-2013, 10:07 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
12,921 posts, read 6,467,168 times
Reputation: 4465
Not my favorite tree at all. But I don't hate them.
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Old 08-28-2013, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Near Tours, France about 47°10'N 0°25'E
2,872 posts, read 3,784,041 times
Reputation: 1863
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed's Mountain View Post
In Europe anywhere that's along the Mediterranean is allowed to have palms, along with Portugal. Nowhere else.
The definition of "mediterranean" area is relative... Vegetation or climate or area hospitable for palms is not obliged to follow those lines. "mediterranean" climate are temperate climate and certainly not tropical. Once again palms are not all tropical... As long as those palms can grow without special protection means that the climate is OK for them to live, whatever they are along the mediterranean sea or not is irrevelant... It is nature that shoose is a palm can live or not in a place, not humans.

What most of those palms need are mild winters (that's why continental places are not fit to them), and a correct among of sunshine year long. That's the case in most of the south-west Atlantic coast of Europe.

Also, in most of Atlantic coast south of the Loire Valley they can fit quite well with the roman-tiled architecture that prevails there, as well with the mix of "mediterranean" and "oceanic" vegetation that often prevail there. http://goo.gl/maps/FLeqv http://goo.gl/maps/y1Bym
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Old 08-28-2013, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Melbourne Australia
688 posts, read 650,609 times
Reputation: 370
Palm trees are by far my favourite kind of tree.
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Old 08-28-2013, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Edmonton, Canada
1,674 posts, read 908,304 times
Reputation: 888
Quote:
Originally Posted by french user View Post
The definition of "mediterranean" area is relative... Vegetation or climate or area hospitable for palms is not obliged to follow those lines. "mediterranean" climate are temperate climate and certainly not tropical. Once again palms are not all tropical... As long as those palms can grow without special protection means that the climate is OK for them to live, whatever they are along the mediterranean sea or not is irrevelant... It is nature that shoose is a palm can live or not in a place, not humans.
Hey if some random coconut drifts up to the west coast of Ireland and establishes itself there, I'm all for that. But those crappy trachys didn't get to Paris naturally: somebody planted them there and they look absurd.


Quote:
Originally Posted by french user View Post
What most of those palms need are mild winters (that's why continental places are not fit to them), and a correct among of sunshine year long. That's the case in most of the south-west Atlantic coast of Europe.

Also, in most of Atlantic coast south of the Loire Valley they can fit quite well with the roman-tiled architecture that prevails there, as well with the mix of "mediterranean" and "oceanic" vegetation that often prevail there. http://goo.gl/maps/FLeqv http://goo.gl/maps/y1Bym
I agree the stuff along the Loire Valley that you pointed out seems fine and perfectly in the correct context. I can extend the northern limit of palms to include that area.
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Old 08-28-2013, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Broward County, FL
16,206 posts, read 7,636,429 times
Reputation: 3530
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperDave72 View Post
ATL is subtropical, but not "warm" subtropical. It has been below zero degrees F (-18C for the non-US posters) in Atlanta in the past, most recently back in '85 when it got to 8 below Fahrenheit. Single digit lows happen a couple times a decade.

Some palms can survive that, but won't look all that great. If another 1985 happens they'll be toast.

Atlanta's native vegetation consists of a bunch of deciduous trees (oaks, maples, hickories, etc) plus some pines & maybe a few broadleaf evergreens - not sure if Live Oak or Southern Magnolia are native there, but I know they can grow in Atlanta.
Exactly, and yes the average high may be in the 50s (low 50s at that) but the average low is barely above freezing. And that's Atlanta, the surrounding suburbs/countryside (outside the 285 loop) probably has average lows below freezing all 3 winter months. Where I lived about 60 miles north of Atlanta the averages for the 3 winters months were Dec: 51/31 Jan: 48/28 Feb: 53/30, not exactly warm in my opinion lol. Record low of -11 F as well.
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