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Old 01-07-2016, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
P reclinata is awesome, imo.
It is, I've seen some nice groves of them in Florida, I thought they were all planted that way but I learned that they produce suckers. I'm a fan of some the Phoenix hybrids as well, especially those containing P. roebelenii.
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Broward County, FL
16,206 posts, read 7,655,577 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
Why not?
What kind of "exotic" are we talking?

Quote:
Originally Posted by G8RCAT View Post
I've never been a fan of Phoenix palms in general. I associate them with dry places. Although there are some in Florida.



But wouldn't you agree that sabal palms fit very well with the landscape of Mobile and New Orleans?
With Mobile and New Orleans - yes. I think it's stupid when people plant palms in like Tennessee or Washington, DC though.
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
11,294 posts, read 16,410,403 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
"Exotic" trees wouldn't really fit the landscape anywhere in Massachusetts.
Monkey Puzzle Trees fit the landscape here, and they're pretty exotic. Don't know if they'd survive in Massachussetts though.
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
15,911 posts, read 12,465,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
What kind of "exotic" are we talking?
Anything not from the region, and able to survive.
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Lexington, KY
12,251 posts, read 6,641,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
It is, I've seen some nice groves of them in Florida, I thought they were all planted that way but I learned that they produce suckers. I'm a fan of some the Phoenix hybrids as well, especially those containing P. roebelenii.
Roebelenii is a nice smaller ornamental palm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
With Mobile and New Orleans - yes. I think it's stupid when people plant palms in like Tennessee or Washington, DC though.
Right, I am just saying it's possible for a plant to technically be non-native without being considered "exotic".
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Socorro, NM
5,979 posts, read 3,080,956 times
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Exotic and non-native mean exactly the same thing.
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,096 posts, read 9,618,988 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
P reclinata is awesome, imo.

It is considered category two invasive in zone 9a thru 11 in Florida. In zone 8b it can be burned down to the ground, but comes back in Spring from suckers. At least that is what I have heard on the gardening forums.

Tomorrow I'm flying out to Atlanta and driving down to Savannah. I plan on getting lots of pics of what the inland South looks like in winter, and I'm also touring the coastal areas like Hilton Head, Lady's Island, the Savannah Coastal Botanical Gardens, etc. I'll let you know what I find lol.
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Lexington, KY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyFL View Post
Exotic and non-native mean exactly the same thing.
No they don't.

Native, Invasive, and Other Plant-Related Definitions | NRCS Connecticut
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:38 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,751 posts, read 39,675,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
Lots of exotic trees fit with the landscape though
I suppose, I'd prefer my landscape has native though. A few non-natives are ok, as long as they're not a risk of them being invasive.
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Old 01-07-2016, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Socorro, NM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G8RCAT View Post
In popular usage, "non-native" and "exotic" are synonymous.
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