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Old 09-02-2016, 12:11 AM
 
78 posts, read 49,117 times
Reputation: 63

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Possibly Phoenix reclinata. Will only survive south Texas and Florida peninsula in the eastern US due to extreme cold events in winter. I believe they are killed by 25F and below.
They are hardy down to zone 9A, according to this:
Senegal Date Palm, African Wild Date Palm Phoenix reclinata

Meaning that the entire coastal South can grow them with ease. See, those warm, rainy summers in the SE US, they are like anabolic steroids for plants, allowing them to beef up so fast. This means that they get more sturdy and established more quickly, allowing them to "tough out" any occasional cold snaps that come through. Even a plant hardy down to 25F can still be planted reasonably in cities like Laredo, Corpus Christi, Houston/Galveston, New Orleans, etc.
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Old 09-02-2016, 12:15 AM
 
78 posts, read 49,117 times
Reputation: 63
Anyways, as technology advances, we will eventually have gene splicing, to the point that all the tropical palms can be spliced with "cold hardy" genes, that will allow them to survive any brief cold periods that may come to the South. Either that, or giant mechas/robots that can terraform, and create mountains where there weren't any before.
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Old 09-02-2016, 12:41 AM
 
Location: White House, TN
5,151 posts, read 3,616,785 times
Reputation: 3235
I don't particularly like palm trees. My favorite trees are deciduous trees that turn beautiful colors in the fall.
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Old 09-02-2016, 01:41 AM
 
997 posts, read 514,339 times
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I love palm trees. My name means 'palm tree'. That would be my real name of course.

I don't know if they are that attractive around here, but in palm tree country, they look good.
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Old 09-02-2016, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,097 posts, read 9,630,326 times
Reputation: 5275
Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
Same. As if palm trees growing somewhere makes it a good place to live. It's really getting rather old the discussion on them, there's even like a 67 page long thread on it FFS. You don't see cold lovers starting threads on where Norway Spruce or Birch trees grow lol. I don't mind talking about vegetation, but why ALWAYS palm trees?

Because palm trees are to mild winter lovers what snow and ice is to cold lovers. Simple as that. Just about every person I know that likes mild winters without a lot of freezing temps also likes palm trees. Palm trees and tropical/subtropical vegetation is to subtropical climates what snow cover is to continental.
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Old 09-02-2016, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,097 posts, read 9,630,326 times
Reputation: 5275
Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostInTheMatrix View Post
They are hardy down to zone 9A, according to this:
Senegal Date Palm, African Wild Date Palm Phoenix reclinata

Meaning that the entire coastal South can grow them with ease. See, those warm, rainy summers in the SE US, they are like anabolic steroids for plants, allowing them to beef up so fast. This means that they get more sturdy and established more quickly, allowing them to "tough out" any occasional cold snaps that come through. Even a plant hardy down to 25F can still be planted reasonably in cities like Laredo, Corpus Christi, Houston/Galveston, New Orleans, etc.

Really? So I can expect to see loads of them in a place like Tybee Island, GA and Savannah? Interesting since I didn't see a single one there or on the Gulf Coast. In fact, 2014 pretty much wiped out every Queen palm (hardier than reclinata) in Gulf Shores, AL. Go figure.
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Old 09-02-2016, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,097 posts, read 9,630,326 times
Reputation: 5275
Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostInTheMatrix View Post
Anyways, as technology advances, we will eventually have gene splicing, to the point that all the tropical palms can be spliced with "cold hardy" genes, that will allow them to survive any brief cold periods that may come to the South. Either that, or giant mechas/robots that can terraform, and create mountains where there weren't any before.

Ooooh I can't wait for those 14,000 ft mountains to be built across the Canadian border. Do you even take yourself seriously? You talk non-sense.
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Old 09-02-2016, 08:33 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,679 posts, read 42,823,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
I like pollarded trees. You do see a lot of them in the UK.
Oh gosh, they do that to crape myrtles here in the south and it looks terrible. We call it crape murder. Also, my neighbor, Speedo Man, conducts an annual chain saw massacre of his shrubs, which look a lot like the picture.
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Old 09-02-2016, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,097 posts, read 9,630,326 times
Reputation: 5275
Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostInTheMatrix View Post

Meaning that the entire coastal South can grow them with ease. See, those warm, rainy summers in the SE US, they are like anabolic steroids for plants, allowing them to beef up so fast. This means that they get more sturdy and established more quickly, allowing them to "tough out" any occasional cold snaps that come through. Even a plant hardy down to 25F can still be planted reasonably in cities like Laredo, Corpus Christi, Houston/Galveston, New Orleans, etc.
Oh and yes those wonderful Summer's beef them up so much they would never let them look like this after winter 2014 when Mobile, AL went to 14F now would they? Yikes poor things thinking they were in a subtropical paradise.






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Old 09-02-2016, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
15,832 posts, read 5,425,786 times
Reputation: 4643
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Ooooh I can't wait for those 14,000 ft mountains to be built across the Canadian border. Do you even take yourself seriously? You talk non-sense.
Don't feed the troll, matter of time before he/she is banned again...
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