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Old 09-02-2016, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,087 posts, read 9,602,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Roystonia, we have some here, and they are quite prevalent in SoCal. They are generally hardy to 30F

I think they are slightly more hardy than Coco palms.
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Old 09-02-2016, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Lexington, KY
12,251 posts, read 6,630,542 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muslim12 View Post
I think the second one is royal palm which is native to South Florida and at one point was native all the way up to Orlando.
It's a Manila Palm.
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Old 09-02-2016, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Socorro, NM
5,979 posts, read 3,075,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muslim12 View Post
I think the second one is royal palm which is native to South Florida and at one point was native all the way up to Orlando.
Wrong and wrong
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Old 09-02-2016, 12:26 PM
 
78 posts, read 48,872 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Thanks a lot lol.
I jest. But I've heard bad stories on the PoC forum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by muslim12 View Post
That's just stupid, I would despise palm trees like that. Takes all the exoticness away from them. Under your logic we will grow palms in barrow soon enough. I would hate that.
I talked only of protection from brief cold spells, not sustained intense cold that lasts the whole winter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
NOLA and Houston are warmer than the Upper Gulf Coast.

Those palms have since come back since I have photos of them. But the point is the warm summers do not eliminate the severe damage that comes from a winter that was not as cold as the 1980's.
They don't eliminate it, but they do make the plant more established, so it can survive cold spells, even if temps are below the hardiness zone (albeit brief).

A strong high pressure can dominate North America in winter, and make the climate stable, even if no mountains or water exist. I believe that is how China remains stable in winter, even in areas with no mountains.
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Old 09-02-2016, 12:27 PM
 
78 posts, read 48,872 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyFL View Post
Wrong and wrong
Actually, royal palms historically ranged in Florida far up the St. John's river.
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Old 09-02-2016, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Socorro, NM
5,979 posts, read 3,075,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostInTheMatrix View Post
Actually, royal palms historically ranged in Florida far up the St. John's river.
The report is anecdotal. There doesn't exist a modern botanical record of Roystonea regia that far north.
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Old 09-02-2016, 02:17 PM
 
78 posts, read 48,872 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyFL View Post
The report is anecdotal. There doesn't exist a modern botanical record of Roystonea regia that far north.
But what difference does that make? Even if not in the modern record, there still exists documentation of such palms up through Central Florida on the St. Johns.
ROYAL PALMS IN UPPER FLORIDA | Science
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Old 09-02-2016, 02:21 PM
 
78 posts, read 48,872 times
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An important contributor to palm growth is humidity/dryness. Washingtonias, as well as many date palms, grow very well in dry climates, but can be quite stunted in humid climates. On the other hand, sabals, livistonas, and bismarkias all prefer humid climates.
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Old 09-02-2016, 02:36 PM
 
78 posts, read 48,872 times
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It can't be stressed enough; the power of winter stability is huge. This place is colder on average than Dallas during winter and is lined with palm trees.
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Old 09-02-2016, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
15,832 posts, read 5,395,558 times
Reputation: 4643
Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostInTheMatrix View Post
It can't be stressed enough; the power of winter stability is huge. This place is colder on average than Dallas during winter and is lined with palm trees.
Well yeah, Las Vegas and Redding, CA both have palms
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