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Old 09-05-2016, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
15,832 posts, read 5,404,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
My favourite palms are the really tall ones in LA.. I forget their name though. Washingtonias?

#

They are so quintessentially Los Angeles.
Washingtonia Filifera, aka California Fan Palm, actually a native of the CA and AZ low desert, but does well on the coast and in the central valley as well obviously

We have tons of them in Phoenix
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Old 09-06-2016, 12:09 AM
 
Location: Katy, Texas
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Washingtonia robusta is the iconic palm of SoCal...found a bit south of the border.
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Old 09-06-2016, 04:51 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asagi View Post
Washingtonia robusta is the iconic palm of SoCal...found a bit south of the border.
Robusta is the Mexican Fan Palm, native to Sonora and Baja California. Robusta's have been planted more in recent years, because they are more common than Filifera, but Filifera was the one that LA planted en masse back in the 20's and 30's
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Old 09-06-2016, 05:12 AM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
10,824 posts, read 6,914,240 times
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Robusta is planted far more often than filifera here. If I had to list the most commonly planted palms I would rate them as such:

1. Trachycarpus
2. CIDP
3. Mediterranean fan palm
4. W. Robusta
5. Butia capitata

In the SW, they seem to be mostly CIDP, trachys and butias.
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Old 09-06-2016, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
11,294 posts, read 16,404,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FirebirdCamaro1220 View Post
Robusta is the Mexican Fan Palm, native to Sonora and Baja California. Robusta's have been planted more in recent years, because they are more common than Filifera, but Filifera was the one that LA planted en masse back in the 20's and 30's
It was W. robusta that was planted en masse around LA for the 1932 Olympics. Interesting how a non-native species (although it is native to the greater region) can become an iconic symbol for a city.
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Old 09-06-2016, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Broward County, FL
16,206 posts, read 7,648,904 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by floridanative10 View Post
Columbia is 2 hours from the coast and I am no palm expert but I know from know from visiting it has Sabal , Mexican Fan , Pindo , windmill . Pretty amazing subtropical climate , very far from the coast. The palms are all over the university and capital .

SC is the palm state , best state flag in the country with and most beautiful city in america in that state. gorgeous architecture




Doesn't matter since they're not "tender" palms. Tom seems to think tropical climate palms are the only measure of "subtropicalness". For whatever reason he expects tropical climate palms at near mid-latitudes on the eastern side of a continent.
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Old 09-06-2016, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
15,888 posts, read 12,454,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
Robusta is planted far more often than filifera here. If I had to list the most commonly planted palms I would rate them as such:

1. Trachycarpus
2. CIDP
3. Mediterranean fan palm
4. W. Robusta
5. Butia capitata

In the SW, they seem to be mostly CIDP, trachys and butias.
Never seen a Med fan palm here.

Here would be
Trachycarpus
CIDP
Queen palms
Butia/Washingtonia about equal
Nikau
Livistonias
Bangalow/Chamadorea about equal
Phoenis roebellini
Sabals
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Old 09-06-2016, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,094 posts, read 9,612,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by floridanative10 View Post
Columbia is 2 hours from the coast and I am no palm expert but I know from know from visiting it has Sabal , Mexican Fan , Pindo , windmill . Pretty amazing subtropical climate , very far from the coast. The palms are all over the university and capital .

SC is the palm state , best state flag in the country with and most beautiful city in america in that state. gorgeous architecture





I question Mexican Fans in Columbia, when one third of them were killed on the Gulf Coast in 2014. Columbia gets far colder than the Gulf Coast of AL. Maybe in highly protected micro-climates, but you certainly don't see them all over the place. They aren't worth the risk.

I saw one in Augusta, and Augusta is warmer than Columbia. I hope to stop in Columbia this winter and take a look around.
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Old 09-06-2016, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,094 posts, read 9,612,710 times
Reputation: 5261
Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
Robusta is planted far more often than filifera here. If I had to list the most commonly planted palms I would rate them as such:

1. Trachycarpus
2. CIDP
3. Mediterranean fan palm
4. W. Robusta
5. Butia capitata

In the SW, they seem to be mostly CIDP, trachys and butias.

Butia and Windmill are my least favorite ranked just above my least fav the sabal palmetto. The other ones I love are Livistona. Livistona have an amazing bright green color in person.

Last edited by tom77falcons; 09-06-2016 at 01:04 PM..
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Old 09-06-2016, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,094 posts, read 9,612,710 times
Reputation: 5261
Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
Doesn't matter since they're not "tender" palms. Tom seems to think tropical climate palms are the only measure of "subtropicalness". For whatever reason he expects tropical climate palms at near mid-latitudes on the eastern side of a continent.
Wrong. The palms I love include subtropical and tropical.

CIDP, Livistona, Mexican Fan, Pygmy Date, and Phoenix reclinata are not tropical palms at all.

But I don't really consider Columbia purely subtropical. I consider it continental subtropical with high standard deviation in winter.

And I'm entitled to my palm opinion on a palm thread.
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