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Old 08-28-2013, 12:14 AM
 
10,388 posts, read 7,467,722 times
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This is a strange thread and yet... here I am.
There are more varieties of palm than any other type of tree. I've recently relocated to Hawaii and I love the palms here!
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Old 08-28-2013, 12:15 AM
 
25,060 posts, read 22,101,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterseat View Post
This is a strange thread and yet... here I am.
There are more varieties of palm than any other type of tree. I've recently relocated to Hawaii and I love the palms here!
Mainlander
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Old 08-28-2013, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 17,503,817 times
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Ok, these are for novelty purposes, but man are these juvenile palms out of place.

http://goo.gl/maps/ZKOXt
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Old 08-28-2013, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Broward County, FL
16,206 posts, read 7,636,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterseat View Post
This is a strange thread and yet... here I am.
There are more varieties of palm than any other type of tree. I've recently relocated to Hawaii and I love the palms here!
Why is this a strange thread? Not everyone has to drool over tropical vegetation and climate, especially if you've lived in 90% of your life in such climates.
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Old 08-28-2013, 07:20 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 8,277,554 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Seems a tough line to establish where they belong and where they don't. Do these really look so out of place in Atlanta where it is very hot in the summer, and pretty mild in winter with avg highs in the 50'sF?
What’s ironic (but typical) … is that the true nature of what belongs where, of historically what occurred, how it got started, and where it leads - has been misrepredted for so long that people now have no idea what’s right or wrong- lol (botanically speaking). Palms are being planted where they truly have no business….yet are not (or are slow to catch on) where they belong.

The history of palm/ subtropical plant cultivation in temperate climates started way back in the 1800’s when subtropical gardening was all the rage in Victoria era England. Robert Fortune brought back the Windmill Palm (Tracycarpus ) to NW Europe, hence the species name and common name (Trachycarpus “fortunei”). Fortune brought back the Chinese Windmill palm from a trip he made to the islands off eastern China (Zhoushan) - a region with a Cfa Humid subtropical climate extremely similar to the eastern margins of other lower latitude climates (eastern Australia/South America, Gulf/South Atlantic USA…etc). The idea was that these palms would help brighten up the drab English weather and add a touch of lower latitude “ tropicalness” of which the English had several links within the empire at that time.

By the 1890’s, while palm cultivation really caught on in many temperate climates like NW Europe, there was still little interest in true subtropical areas. Granted times are changing now, but to this day there are vast areas in the southern USA, eastern Australia, and subtropical South America that are technically subtropical - where one would rarely spot a palm tree on a front lawn or in the private/public garden. You mention Atlanta (technically a subtropical climate with 8 or more months of 10 C and a place where there are native palms nearby)….fifteen or twenty years ago you find more palms growing in Seattle, Portland, London, or Zurich…than in Atlanta or Virginia Beach. Look at parts of interior Florida, evergreen Live Oaks, Bay Trees, Magnolias, …etc are far more common than palms (unless a wild area is close by). For some strange reason, folks seems to have less interest in palms where that are native.

The funniest example of this is cactus: When I lived in Florida there was a company that shipped a native cactus (Opuntia Humifusa ) to plant dealers in NW Europe. Opuntia humifusa is native to the sand dunes of the East Coast from Rhode Island south to Florida and into the West Indies (Caribbean). Yet, when I lived in Florida (and later coastal Delaware and Connecticut) I could not find a single one of these native cacti for sale in garden centers – none of the local plant dealers had them (and they had little interest in ever getting them). Finally (and sadly) when I wanted to plant some mixed in with Yucca in a dry bed near my mailbox - I had to resort to finding them wild on Connecticut/New Jersey and Florida beach dunes, digging them out, and bring them home. The irony.

Botanically speaking…things are not always what they seem.
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Old 08-28-2013, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Near Tours, France about 47°10'N 0°25'E
2,872 posts, read 3,784,041 times
Reputation: 1863
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
Ok, these are for novelty purposes, but man are these juvenile palms out of place.

http://goo.gl/maps/ZKOXt

No, they fit perfectly!

As well as here:
http://goo.gl/maps/F89q5
http://goo.gl/maps/Ahi0z
http://goo.gl/maps/eo4Pb
http://goo.gl/maps/XgvPg
http://goo.gl/maps/vuEWR

Or Atlantic coasts's palms: despite being labelized as "oceanic", palms those palms fit well there, in the middle with parasol pines and other "mediterranean" species as weel as decidous "oceanic" ones.
http://goo.gl/maps/MZ8gi
http://goo.gl/maps/1ApvO
http://goo.gl/maps/2Gy9a

http://goo.gl/maps/o7xSA
http://goo.gl/maps/1SU3G

That might look more out of context here in Britanny, but that's mainly because it doesn't fit well with the slate architecture wich fell more "cool climate"...
http://goo.gl/maps/ntd58


Or Parisian palm trees: !
http://goo.gl/maps/cGd9a

Or one of the few Tours's palms... !
http://goo.gl/maps/SdnVW




Those palms do fit better in European shores than in the tropics, where they do not belong. Inversely, tropical palms such as coconuts would be ridiculous in Europe and mediterranean areas in general.

Last edited by french user; 08-28-2013 at 08:10 AM..
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Old 08-28-2013, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Broward County, FL
16,206 posts, read 7,636,429 times
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^^ I am sorry...but to someone who's lived in FL for 15 out of my 20 years of life, those palms look way out of place....lol especially the Parisian one *shudders*
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Old 08-28-2013, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 17,503,817 times
Reputation: 11103
I hate scots pine. They're ugly.

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Old 08-28-2013, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Near Tours, France about 47°10'N 0°25'E
2,872 posts, read 3,784,041 times
Reputation: 1863
Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
^^ I am sorry...but to someone who's lived in FL for 15 out of my 20 years of life, those palms look way out of place....lol especially the Parisian one *shudders*
I agree that the Parisian ones are bit unusual... But those are not "tropical palms"!... "Mediterranean" palms would look way more out of context in southern Florida or any tropical country than insouthern Europe in my view. Even then most tropical palms you have in Florida have been imported too.
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Old 08-28-2013, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Near Tours, France about 47°10'N 0°25'E
2,872 posts, read 3,784,041 times
Reputation: 1863
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
I hate scots pine. They're ugly.

I like them, as weel as the maritim pines, even if they are always critized as "poor pines"...
Maritime pine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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