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Old 08-29-2013, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudcrash619 View Post
That would be amazing
Yes, it would. As I said before, if average temps for this area were to drop by 5 C in summer and at least that much in winter, I'd be staying put...lol. Don't think it's gonna happen, not in my lifetime. Bummer.
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Old 08-29-2013, 04:31 PM
 
Location: White House, TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Looks like the Deep South cooled by 5-10°C in winter, 2-5°C in summer.
I'll say 10 C in winter for me, 5 C in summer, since I'm in the Upper South...

January temperatures of 8 / -2 C (46 / 28 F) become -2 / -12 C (28 / 10 F)

July temperatures of 32 / 21 C (90 / 70 F) become 27 / 16 C (81 / 61 F)

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Old 08-29-2013, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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I think the drop implies the Dec-Jan-Feb average.. not the month averages.
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Old 08-29-2013, 04:44 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
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20°C colder in summer and winter for me. So summer mean of 2°C, winter mean of -25°C. American weather would be extremely different. Summer would have a big temperature contrast between the north and south, with a winter-like strength in the Jet Stream. Summer snowstorms ('northeasters?) would be likely in the Mid Atlantic. Cold, dry winds off the ice sheet would blast the landscape. What would happen if they hit moist Gulf of Mexico derived air. The higher elevation, plus the permament cold would (I think) lead to a semi-permament high pressure system on Eastern Canada, changing air motion.
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Old 08-29-2013, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Broward County, FL
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Looks like Central Manitoba was 30 C colder in the Ice Age during winter
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Old 08-29-2013, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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I remember talking about storms during the Ice Age with someone. He was saying there wouldn't be any big storms because it would be too cold... I wasn't sold on the fact but I'm really not sure. Surface and air temps would still be different so there would technically be warmth to drive moisture and a storm. No? Fronts would still happen and even the Polar and Sub jet (if there is one) explosion. Or a coastal storm.

Do you guys think storms would happen in an Ice Age?
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Old 08-29-2013, 05:01 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
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So it would be like manitoba weather here year round then.
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Old 08-29-2013, 05:04 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
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No storms because the ice would break up.
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Old 08-29-2013, 05:09 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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With all the sharp temperature contrasts surely this would mean much more powerful storms? I mean arctic tundra air clashing with tropical moisture further south would mean massive cyclonic conditions in mid latitudes near Eastern North America, Western Europe and Eastern Asia? Or maybe the extremely cold dry air would just be to much?
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Old 08-29-2013, 05:10 PM
 
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During the Younger Dryas, 10,000 years ago, ice and tundra covered much of Northwest Europe





and this is what North America looked like


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