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Old 08-29-2013, 05:10 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
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Isn't it obvious that there are less storms when its colder.

Hence being really dry when sea temps are below normal.
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Old 08-29-2013, 05:14 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac15 View Post
Isn't it obvious that there are less storms when its colder.

Hence being really dry when sea temps are below normal.
Well maybe but wouldn't the very cold dry air class with the warmer air further south? Wouldn't this clashing cause for windier conditions.
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Old 08-29-2013, 05:21 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
I remember talking about storms during the Ice Age with someone. He was saying there wouldn't be any big storms because it would be too cold... I wasn't sold on the fact but I'm really not sure. Surface and air temps would still be different so there would technically be warmth to drive moisture and a storm. No? Fronts would still happen and even the Polar and Sub jet (if there is one) explosion. Or a coastal storm.

Do you guys think storms would happen in an Ice Age?
More storms, as I said before, as the temperature contrast would be larger. On the ice sheet itself, there wouldn't more storms (the middle of the Greenland Ice Sheet isn't that stormy)

Quote:
Originally Posted by alex985 View Post
Looks like Central Manitoba was 30 C colder in the Ice Age during winter
It was under an ice sheet. Probably similar to interior Greenland today.

==========================================

found this techincal paper:

http://www.mmm.ucar.edu/mm5/workshop...cinta.Rick.pdf

Look at figure 3 on the second page. Looks rather wet. Under discussion it mentions there would be frequent storms passing near the southern margin due to the temperature contrast.
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Old 08-29-2013, 05:28 PM
 
Location: London
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Looks like the Deep South cooled by 5-10°C in winter, 2-5°C in summer.
Interesting...that doesn't seem all that cold. For instance, many states' coldest months on record would easily fall within that range: February 1899, February 1934, January 1977.... Wasn't January 2004 in NYC about -4C , therefore, already about 5C lower than average...?

If those ranges for the Deep South are correct, that would be rather surprising given that most of Canada entirely under very thick ice during the Ice Age....

I just noticed something: that graph refers to "units: K" - does "K" is that supposed to stand for "Kelvin" (and not Celsius)?
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Old 08-29-2013, 06:09 PM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
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Kelvin degrees and Celcius degrees are the same though.
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Old 08-29-2013, 06:23 PM
 
Location: London
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Originally Posted by B87 View Post
Kelvin degrees and Celcius degrees are the same though.
They're often used together in scientific literature but they're not the same, otherwise there would be no need for conversion formulae.
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Old 08-29-2013, 06:27 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Superluminal View Post
They're often used together in scientific literature but they're not the same, otherwise there would be no need for conversion formulae.
They're same because the map is showing changes in temperature rather than the actual temperature.

0°C = 273.15K
1°C = 274.15K


so a warming of 1°C is a warming by 1K.
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Old 08-29-2013, 06:31 PM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Superluminal View Post
They're often used together in scientific literature but they're not the same, otherwise there would be no need for conversion formulae.
Yes, they are. The absolute scales are different, but one Kelvin degree is the same value as one Celcius degree.
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Old 08-29-2013, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P London View Post
Or maybe the etremely cold dry air would just be to much?
Right, that was part of the debate with my cousin. It would be so cold and dry that moisture would evaporate..

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
More storms, as I said before, as the temperature contrast would be larger. On the ice sheet itself, there wouldn't more storms (the middle of the Greenland Ice Sheet isn't that stormy)
.
Maybe I was thinking just over the areas covered in snow and ice. Greenland gets snowstorms. No? I think the question would be where does the storm come from. If everything is covered in ice including lakes, rivers and seas .. then the land or water wouldn't even help create these storms. I'm still on the fence.

Thanks for the info. Will read soon.
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Old 08-29-2013, 07:29 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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From the same PMIP source, it looks like the larger temperature contrast wins out over the less available water. Perhaps because the Gulf of Mexico and Pacific haven't cooled by much, there's still a source for lots of water vapor over North America. Over the ice sheet, it's too cold and dry for much precipitation. All the storm tracks that'd pass through Canada today get deflected south. This is all assuming the source is accurate...The average error (rms — root mean squared error) is of the same magnitude as the change for many places.



In mm/day, multiply by 365 to get mm/year or 14.37 to get in/year.
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