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Old 09-01-2013, 09:12 AM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Yes it is. Tundra starts in North America at 55N roughly. In Russia, it starts at 60N
True, 55N around shores of Hudson Bay, however the "tree line" varies quite a bit,
both in Canada and Russia, so starting at 55N or 60N is a very rough generalization at best.

Heading west away from Hudson Bay the tree line advances steadily north due to the warmer SUMMER temps.
The MacKenzie River Valley in Canada's NWT features some of the warmest summer conditions in
northern Canada, average july highs above 20c (low to mid 70sF) almost as warm at northern Russia.
Likewise for lower elevation valley areas of the Yukon, even northern Yukon, like Old Crow.
Tree line reaches as far north as 68N in the MacKenzie Delta.

Reason why Russian "tree line" is on average farther north than in Canada is due to warmer summers,
not the winters, Russian Siberian winters are COLDER, hopefully no arguments on that

Last edited by BMI; 09-01-2013 at 09:21 AM..
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Old 09-01-2013, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Then why are trees growing in Vadso, on the northern coast of Norway?



I'm not sure what that map is denoting, but it isn't the tree line.
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Old 09-01-2013, 10:00 AM
 
Location: York
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Bardufoss in Norway has plenty of trees, and that's above 69N. I'm sure there are trees even further North though too.
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Old 09-01-2013, 10:10 AM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Then why are trees growing in Vadso, on the northern coast of Norway?



I'm not sure what that map is denoting, but it isn't the tree line.
Well theunblabla was trying to say that the treeline in north america is lower when it actually isn't.
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Old 09-01-2013, 10:13 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac15 View Post
Well theunblabla was trying to say that the treeline in north america is lower when it actually isn't.
Source? You really need to back up your claims. It's rather easy on the internet.

Tree line - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Here's the same map you posted. Dark green is the treeline.

Tree line in the Arctic | GRID-Arendal - Maps & Graphics library
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Old 09-01-2013, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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I'm not so sure inland Russia is colder than Canada. Omsk has average Jan temps of 10/-5F, and Winnipeg in Canada has avg Jan temps of 9/-9F? It is not elevation as they are very close in altitude. And Winnipeg is five degrees lower in latitude. Omsk if around 1700 miles from the Baltic, and Winnipeg is around 1300 from the Pacific.
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Old 09-01-2013, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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The coldest parts of Russia are colder than the coldest parts of Canada, but even in central Asia, Russian cities do not appear to be spectacularly cold for their latitude and inland location. Omsk and Novosibirsk are similar to Winnipeg. With that being said, Winnipeg just appears to be very cold in winter given its latitude. I think it's fair to say that places like southern Manitoba are too cold in winter for their latitude, rather than places like Omsk being too mild. I wonder if Omsk would be much colder if there was Rockies-like mountain range to the west of it (the Urals are quite low). Something interesting to ponder.
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Old 09-01-2013, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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I'd love to visit the polar tundra of Northern Ireland
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Old 09-01-2013, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
The coldest parts of Russia are colder than the coldest parts of Canada, but even in central Asia, Russian cities do not appear to be spectacularly cold for their latitude and inland location. Omsk and Novosibirsk are similar to Winnipeg. With that being said, Winnipeg just appears to be very cold in winter given its latitude. I think it's fair to say that places like southern Manitoba are too cold in winter for their latitude, rather than places like Omsk being too mild. I wonder if Omsk would be much colder if there was Rockies-like mountain range to the west of it (the Urals are quite low). Something interesting to ponder.
In Asia they are east-west as you well know. I think it would be different. That is not the only article I ever came across that mentions the Rockies and the buckles in the Jetstream. I think averages might not change much here, but I do believe record lows would go way up. And I think winter would be a lot more stable here with lower std deviation. A flat Jetstream doesn't make Philly like LA, but more like London.
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Old 09-01-2013, 11:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I'm not so sure inland Russia is colder than Canada. Omsk has average Jan temps of 10/-5F, and Winnipeg in Canada has avg Jan temps of 9/-9F? It is not elevation as they are very close in altitude. And Winnipeg is five degrees lower in latitude. Omsk if around 1700 miles from the Baltic, and Winnipeg is around 1300 from the Pacific.
Hey Tom, show me a place in Canada as cold in the winter as Yakutsk, good luck.
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