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View Poll Results: What can you say about the climate of those places?
Puerto de Navacerrada, Spain 10 76.92%
Mont Aigoual, France 3 23.08%
Voters: 13. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-02-2013, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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Puerto de Navacerrada warmer summers...
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Old 09-03-2013, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Segovia, central Spain, 1230 m asl, Csb Mediterranean with strong continental influence, 40º43 N
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Troms View Post
Any place in the Italian Alps at a similar elevation would be several °C colder than Puerto de Navacerrada and maybe colder than Mont Aigoual, too.
The reason the Iberian peninsula and southern France experience higher temperatures is because they work as a "bridge", where heat waves from North Africa cross to mainland Europe easily, so extreme heat in summer tend to be more common there than in Italian Alps.

However, on average summer weather without heat waves from Africa, temperatures at similar elevation and latitude would be similar.
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Old 09-03-2013, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Segovia, central Spain, 1230 m asl, Csb Mediterranean with strong continental influence, 40º43 N
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Originally Posted by Ed's Mountain View Post
I'd have to go for Puerto de Navacerrada or because it's a bit warmer but both places have shocking summers even considering their altitude. Mont Aigoual is particularly cold in summer compared to places at similar altitude and latitude in North America.
Really? Well, show me an example of those places.
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Old 09-03-2013, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Edmonton, Canada
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Originally Posted by overdrive1979 View Post
Really? Well, show me an example of those places.
Casper, Wyoming, elevation 1560m and latitude about 43N has average highs 31C in July--about 14C higher than Mont Aigoual!

Butte, Montana, elevation almost 1700m and latitude about 46N (hence higher up and further north) has average highs 27C in July. Of note, Mont Aigoual's all-time ever highest temp is 27.5C according to Wikipedia.
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Old 09-03-2013, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Paris
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You really can't compare the temps of a mountain top to those of a city located in a plain or a valley. Mont Aigoual is a good indicator of the airmass (850 hPa temps), as its altitude is close to that level. Wind and topography prevent strong soil heating and radiational cooling. Hence the low diurnal range. Same for Navacerrada pass, though to a lesser extent, as it's not a summit.
Montana is consistently high and thus benefits from solar heating of the surrounding land.

Briançon, the highest 10k+ city in France, has a 25°C average July high and a 36°C record, near Mont Aigoual's altitude (1324 m). Needless to say that it's not a mountain top.
http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian%C3%A7on

Here's a slightly higher mountain top in New England. The record high there is 22°C.
Mount Washington (New Hampshire) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 09-03-2013, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Edmonton, Canada
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Originally Posted by Rozenn View Post
You really can't compare the temps of a mountain top to those of a city located in a plain or a valley. Mont Aigoual is a good indicator of the airmass (850 hPa temps), as its altitude is close to that level. Wind and topography prevent strong soil heating and radiational cooling. Hence the low diurnal range. Same for Navacerrada pass, though to a lesser extent, as it's not a summit.
Montana is consistently high and thus benefits from solar heating of the surrounding land.

Briançon, the highest 10k+ city in France, has a 25°C average July high and a 36°C record, near Mont Aigoual's altitude (1324 m). Needless to say that it's not a mountain top.
Briançon - Wikipédia

Here's a slightly higher mountain top in New England. The record high there is 22°C.
Mount Washington (New Hampshire) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
I wasn't aware of the local topography of these places--thank you. That helps explain it. Plus maybe some contribution from the overall maritime tendency of western Europe?
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Old 09-04-2013, 01:39 AM
 
Location: Segovia, central Spain, 1230 m asl, Csb Mediterranean with strong continental influence, 40º43 N
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Originally Posted by Ed's Mountain View Post
I wasn't aware of the local topography of these places--thank you. That helps explain it. Plus maybe some contribution from the overall maritime tendency of western Europe?
Yes. When westerlies blow here keep temperatures in line, even in summer with sunny and dry conditions.
There are not high mountain ranges placed perpendiculary to Atlantic ocean, so there are not adiabatic heating with westerlies wind in Iberian peninsula and southern France, except for coastal mediterranean areas.
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Old 09-04-2013, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Segovia, central Spain, 1230 m asl, Csb Mediterranean with strong continental influence, 40º43 N
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overdrive1979 View Post
Yes. When westerlies blow here keep temperatures in line, even in summer with sunny and dry conditions.
There are not high mountain ranges placed perpendiculary to Atlantic ocean, so there are not adiabatic heating with westerlies wind in Iberian peninsula and southern France, except for coastal mediterranean areas.
Sorry, I mean run paralell to Atlantic coast.
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Old 09-05-2013, 07:03 AM
 
Location: Near Tours, France about 47°10'N 0°25'E
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overdrive1979 View Post
The reason the Iberian peninsula and southern France experience higher temperatures is because they work as a "bridge", where heat waves from North Africa cross to mainland Europe easily, so extreme heat in summer tend to be more common there than in Italian Alps.
.
Yes, that's true. The heatwaves we experience in France usually happen when the air comes from north Africa passing thru the Iberian Peninsula; that's the reason why when there are heatwaves, the temperature records of the cities of south-west or central France use to be higher than those situated along the mediterranean coast; while the averages are higher along the med than elsewhere.
For exemple, during the 2003 heatwave Nice had among the "coolest" temepratures of the country, the city was almost not hitten by the heatwave, while Paris had 40°C and Toulouse close to 44°C, because of this 'peninsular bridge".
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