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Old 09-06-2013, 09:08 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Bingo. I preach this to so many. I bolded the important parts. The arctic plays a role. The flow plays a role. The high pressures and the low pressures play a role in affecting Midwest and Eastern Canada & US. There's the reasons. Not just as simple as a mountain or body of water. If one of those reasons aren't around then the theory is non existant. So it would be cool if we talked about the usual flow of things rather then single out one thing.

Look to the west...and north.
True, the different pressure systems and their movement are the direct cause of the weather patterns in eastern North America, and their frequent. But then one might ask the question: why do we get arctic flows more often in some spots than others? Semi-stationary high pressures? Lows, etc?

Why does the Hudson Bay have a semi-stationary high pressure?

Ultimately, differences in the pressure patterns on the globe (I mean on average, not saying any place will always get a certain airflow/weather from a geography, just more or less likely) must come from geography. A hypothetical "water world" might have day to day storms and some random weather shifts but overall (averaged long-term), the climate would be completely zonal: there would be no difference in temperature going east or west nor in highs or lows. Upper level winds would always average west-east. Something like the Bermuda High or Icelandic Low couldn't exist, just some latitudes would tend to have higher or lower pressures.

The reason why we have pressure systems and different airflows at different longitudes is from geography, or differential heating/cooling on earth's surface. Either from mountains or land-sea differences. The mountains enhance the waviness in the airflow as I said.

Some (or maybe all) of this may be obvious, but I wanted to spell out the connections clearly.
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Old 09-07-2013, 04:59 AM
 
Location: Paris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by das8929 View Post
I'm really into comparing temperatures so I made this map here showing the average January temperature. I was pretty surprised how warm Alaska is for its latitude, and also wonder if Hudson Bay contributes to the cold reaching further south than it otherwise would.
Not sure, the map shows that the Quebec side is less cold than MB/NU at similar latitudes. In Asia, the Yakutia and Far East experience the coldest temps, whereas in North America, coldest winter climates are located more or less the the center of the continent. Imo, the Hudson Bay plays a role in this anomaly at higher latitudes (and of course the Great Lakes at lower latitudes).
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Old 09-07-2013, 05:57 AM
 
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Hmm...

Edmonton, Alberta: 53'32 N, Average temp = 3.9 C (Located in the middle of nowhere)

Moosonee, Ontario: 51'16 N, Average temp = -1.1 C (On the south coast of James Bay, a part of Hudson Bay)

Taking latitude into account, Moosonee is 6.6 C colder than inland places at the same latitude, and it's on the south coast not the east. The east coast would be even colder.
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Old 09-07-2013, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Vernon, British Columbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by das8929 View Post
I'm really into comparing temperatures so I made this map here showing the average January temperature. I was pretty surprised how warm Alaska is for its latitude, and also wonder if Hudson Bay contributes to the cold reaching further south than it otherwise would.
Where it the legend?
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Old 09-07-2013, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Paris
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caleb Yeung View Post
Hmm...

Edmonton, Alberta: 53'32 N, Average temp = 3.9 C (Located in the middle of nowhere)

Moosonee, Ontario: 51'16 N, Average temp = -1.1 C (On the south coast of James Bay, a part of Hudson Bay)

Taking latitude into account, Moosonee is 6.6 C colder than inland places at the same latitude, and it's on the south coast not the east. The east coast would be even colder.
Edmonton is too much west. Btw, I was only talking about winter. On das8929's map, areas west of the bay are slightly colder than areas east of it.

For example, Churchill, MB is slightly colder than Inukjuak, QC in winter. Though the most noticeable difference is Inukjuak's seasonal lag, most likely due to westerlies flowing across the bay.
Churchill, Manitoba - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Inukjuak, Quebec - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 10-10-2013, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Southern US
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glacierx View Post
Nice map! It is interesting that the warmest areas of northern Canada (the Yukon) also records the continent's coldest temperature of the year. The Yukon has been Canada's cold spot for 6 years running. List of extreme temperatures in Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Actually it is not surprising at all. Genereally, places influenced by a continental climate have more temperature extremes (winter temps drop a lot and summer soars quite easily). Areas affected by the water (like NE Canada) Have less temperature extremes. The same comparisons can be seen in Europe where England has mild winters and summers that are not scorching, yet Russian gets torch summers with deadly heat and wildfires and obviously much more frigid winters.
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Old 10-10-2013, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Vernon, British Columbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Santaronto View Post
Actually it is not surprising at all. Genereally, places influenced by a continental climate have more temperature extremes (winter temps drop a lot and summer soars quite easily). Areas affected by the water (like NE Canada) Have less temperature extremes. The same comparisons can be seen in Europe where England has mild winters and summers that are not scorching, yet Russian gets torch summers with deadly heat and wildfires and obviously much more frigid winters.
I think you missed my point. Let illustrate with a map showing 4 different places in Western Canada. Now, point B has a colder winter than point A, and point D has a colder winter than point C, BUT points A and C record much colder temperatures almost every winter. Even though point A has mild winters compared to a place like point B and even Winnipeg (east and south of point B), the extremes experienced there are much colder than anything you'll ever find in Winterpeg. Point C, in the Yukon, has mild winters compared to point D, but often records the coldest temperatures on the continent when it does get cold.

Last edited by Glacierx; 10-10-2013 at 06:50 PM..
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Old 10-10-2013, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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Too far apart to have the Hudson bay be a part of it, but Mayo in the Yukon (63.6N) has reached 10C in every month and a record low of -62C. (February has a record high of 12C, average -19C, record low -62C). Yearly average -3C.

On the other side of continental Canada is Baker Lake, Nunavut (64.3N), about 320 km inland from the Bay. January averages -32C, February -25C, Yearly average is -12C. So significantly cooler, but record low is -51C, and it has not broken freezing in D, J, or F. Hasn't reached 10C from October through April (far, far more seasonal lag, May has an average high of -2C).

Rankin Inlet is a bit further south and right on the Hudson bay. Record low is -50C, summers only average 10C. Winters a few degrees milder than Baker Lake, summers a bit cooler, and record highs are lower, absolute record high 30.5C versus 33.6 for Baker lake and 35.6 for Mayo.

I remember Inuvik having the warmest temperature in Canada one day in the spring, not sure how rare that is. I thought I saw statistics once but don't remember where.


tl;dr places like the Yukon have milder averages but much more variation, places near the coast in Nunavut have colder averages but less variation, fewer thaws and cold snaps.

Last edited by Crunch41; 10-10-2013 at 07:34 PM.. Reason: nicer links
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