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View Poll Results: London vs Chicago
London 33 41.77%
Chicago 46 58.23%
Voters: 79. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 09-12-2013, 11:47 PM
B87 B87 started this thread
 
Location: Norwich, UK
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By heavy downpour I meant a short shower. A rainy day in summer is probably going to be a 20 min shower. A rainy day in January might have 2 hours of light rain or drizzle.
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Old 09-12-2013, 11:55 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
By heavy downpour I meant a short shower. A rainy day in summer is probably going to be a 20 min shower. A rainy day in January might have 2 hours of light rain or drizzle.
Quite different to here, where a rainy day often means exactly that. It sounds like it rains for less time over there than here, but that's the opposite impression I get from UK folk over here.
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Old 09-13-2013, 12:11 AM
B87 B87 started this thread
 
Location: Norwich, UK
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Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
Quite different to here, where a rainy day often means exactly that. It sounds like it rains for less time over there than here, but that's the opposite impression I get from UK folk over here.
I posted the rain hours for London here before. The wettest month is January with 51 hours, July is the driest with 26 hours. There are 427 hours annually (4.8% of the year).

By comparison, Seattle gets 822 hours.
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Old 09-13-2013, 06:05 AM
 
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Chicago. Overall cooler and more interesting.
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Old 09-13-2013, 09:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagogeorge View Post

Out of curiosity what is the highest monthly average max reached in Philly or in the surrounding metro area?

I think I answered my own question

July 2011 had a Mean temp of 82.4F/28.0C and an average max of 91.9F/33.3C (Philadelphia International airport).
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Old 09-13-2013, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Originally Posted by chicagogeorge View Post
The city of Chicago's record high is 5C higher than London's. but yes the city does have lame record highs thanks to the moderating influence of Lake Michigan. A high 46.7C was reached just about 50 miles outside the city limits






Out of curiosity what is the highest monthly average max reached in Philly or in the surrounding metro area?

You talking about highest ever avg monthly temp? Probably a summer month in the low 80's range.

Still doesn't change the fact your winters are much colder than ours as I have pointed out. The winter of 77 is legend around here, and the fact that that is not out of the ordinary for Chicago tells me all I need to know about your winter.
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Old 09-13-2013, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
I guess it depends on the definition of heavy downpours. I don't think somewhere like London would have the same frequency or rate of downpours typical in Chicago, although I know they do happen at times. Ben86 posted about a 3 hr/176mm (from memory)downpour that happened in London a few years ago.

My point to Hartfordd, was really that drizzle isn't a feature determined by climate type, but rather latitude or geography. It just happens that many Oceanic climates are in higher latitudes.

Very good point Joe. Wouldn't a place like Bermuda be considered "Oceanic", yet I doubt you will see many drizzly days there.
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Old 09-13-2013, 11:45 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Very good point Joe. Wouldn't a place like Bermuda be considered "Oceanic", yet I doubt you will see many drizzly days there.
I think oceanic is often used to referred to cool summer oceanic climates, rather than just any climate modified by the ocean.
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Old 09-13-2013, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Jeez, how in the heck is Chicago beating London. This board is chock full of winter lovers, lol.

Seems London loses every climate battle. I'm not fond of the summer weather, but it isn't nearly as bad as other climates at that latitude that are continental. To me the winter in London is way, way better than even an above normal winter in Chicago.
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Old 09-13-2013, 11:58 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Jeez, how in the heck is Chicago beating London. This board is chock full of winter lovers, lol.

Seems London loses every climate battle. I'm not fond of the summer weather, but it isn't nearly as bad as other climates at that latitude that are continental. To me the winter in London is way, way better than even an above normal winter in Chicago.
Winter lovers? Or just more extreme weather? Remember that chart dhdh did? I'm thinking there should a new version of it with all the new posters we have. I'm leaning towards London, but London is also far cloudier than Chicago, so maybe not.

Also, people focus on the peak of the summer. The July / August temperatures are fine for summer to me. The problem is the should season (May, June and September roughly) it drops below highs in the 70s. It's not warm for very long.
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