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View Poll Results: Rate
A 2 4.26%
B 11 23.40%
C 15 31.91%
D 11 23.40%
E 4 8.51%
F 4 8.51%
Voters: 47. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-14-2013, 03:02 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac15 View Post
Yea thats what my view is, they keep going on and on about the mean to make their climates colder. But in reality their climate is not that cold, they only get the mad lows because of the continental climate. If their climate was here it would not be that low. But does it really matter when it gets to 9c in the day anyway...
But the continental climate makes the highs higher and the lows lower. I still don't get why the highs are more important than the lows. The mean affects snow retention more here, in my experience. Also 9C is not Philadelphia's usual max in January or February.

Regardless, our total snowfall is much higher and the number of days of snow on the ground is much higher. For here, remember my winters are quite different from Philadelphia's.
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Old 09-14-2013, 03:04 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
Those cold nights make the snow so icy hard cold, that it has no time to melt, especially if new snow falls. And this was early April, and the sun strength was already considerable. The snowpack started to melt fast only when nights were above freezing and it had 24 hours a day time to melt.

Same here. Except less so in April since we get much more sun.
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Old 09-14-2013, 03:05 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
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Yes but in Northern Ireland at this latitude the winter highs affect the snow lying not the night time lows. If it were to be 9c here everyday and -8c at night the snow would eventually melt very quickly.

But if it were 2c and -2c it would last a long time.
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Old 09-14-2013, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Finland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Winters in Turku would be absolutely fine, even if it doesn't snow that much, at least the snow sticks around, and you guys don't get very mild in the winter, plus it's quite cloudy in the winter with a very low sun angle, all of which help to preserve the snow. Even a place like Stockholm, which has rather 'so-so' averages, can retain snow for months even in 'normal' winters. Mild winters are a big no-no however.
Yes that's true, but we are not talking about Turku, but all possible places that can have a average high of 5C and low of -8C. It is still possible to retain the snowpack, and the high is just a number. Let's take upstate NY for an example. The day is still less than 10 hours long in January, and less than 11 until 25 February. So if nights are constantly below freezing, the sun rises at 7:30, temps climb above freezing around 10, maybe 9:30, peaking at 6C at 14:00, and slowly dropping until it reaches freezing a half hour after sunset, which is at 18:00. That means it's only possible for the snow to melt for 8-9 hours, and impossible to melt rest of the day.

So even if the high is a scary 6C, only millimeters of the snowpack melts. Then when suddenly upstate NY gets highs of 15C and 2C during the nights, the snowpack is in trouble. But as you said, we don't have those temps here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac15 View Post
It's not good if it gets to 9c in the day no. It doesn't matter if it is -8c.
It's not good, but it's possible. We had highs of 7C and lows of -8C this April and the melting was painfully slow.
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Old 09-14-2013, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariete View Post
Yes that's true, but we are not talking about Turku, but all possible places that can have a average high of 5C and low of -8C. .
But Philadelphia does not fit that bill, and that is the place we are discussing. And even so, I wouldn't want frequent temps above freezing. I've experienced that here and while it is possible to retain the snow, the snow eventually becomes hard like ice, and I don't like that.
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Old 09-14-2013, 03:15 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,749 posts, read 39,655,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac15 View Post
Yes but in Northern Ireland at this latitude the winter highs affect the snow lying not the night time lows. If it were to be 9c here everyday and -8c at night the snow would eventually melt very quickly.

But if it were 2c and -2c it would last a long time.
Does that combination even happen there?! But you were talking about North American climates. The lows do have a big role in snow retention. The mean is the best judge on whether snow lasts, though higher diurnal ranges are a bit worse.

I think British posters are judging snow pack by weather their familiar with. It doesn't work like that here, Ariete's post is spot on.
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Old 09-14-2013, 03:17 PM
 
Location: North West Northern Ireland.
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Of course it has happened.

We had 20c -4c one day.
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Old 09-14-2013, 03:19 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac15 View Post
Of course it has happened.

We had 20c -4c one day.
ok give an example.
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Old 09-14-2013, 03:22 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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Ithaca, NY has some good snow tables. Depth and snowfall:

The Ithaca Climate Page :: Northeast Regional Climate Center

I don't think anywhere lowlying in the UK is comparable.
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Old 09-14-2013, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post

I think British posters are judging snow pack by weather their familiar with. It doesn't work like that here, Ariete's post is spot on.
Read my post above yours. An average high of 5C and an average low of -8C will definitely result in crappy crunchy icy snow, which is inferior to powdery snow or snow that you can walk in with ease.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Ithaca, NY has some good snow tables. Depth and snowfall:

The Ithaca Climate Page :: Northeast Regional Climate Center

I don't think anywhere lowlying in the UK is comparable.
Who said there was?
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