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View Poll Results: How warm must it at least be?
Warm summers with no variable snowpack in winter 10 18.87%
Hot summers with no variable snowpack in winter 13 24.53%
Chilly winters and warm summers 5 9.43%
Chilly winters and hot summers 8 15.09%
Not any of the above (please explain) 17 32.08%
Voters: 53. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 09-24-2013, 08:08 AM
 
Location: The failed metropolis
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What means subtropical?

Sorry, I typed the 'no' by accident in options 1 and 2. By that I mean winters like NYC with a mean temp around 0 C or thereabouts.
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Old 09-24-2013, 08:15 AM
B87
 
Location: SW London
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Mild to hot summers, mild to warm winters.

Absolutely no snow or frost, apart from in record-breaking events.
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Old 09-24-2013, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Kharkiv, Ukraine
1,910 posts, read 823,245 times
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Mild winters and hot summers.
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Old 09-24-2013, 08:34 AM
 
Location: France
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Influenced by tropical weather systems in the warmer part of the year and more temperate, frontal weather in the colder part.
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Old 09-24-2013, 08:34 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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To be subtropical summers must be the most dominate season or thereabouts.

Same as above really, Hot to warm summers and mild to slightly chilly winters. Snow and frost should be exceptionally rare. Precipitation pattern shouldn't matter.

Examples

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Orleans#Climate

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tampa,_Florida#Climate

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seville#Climate

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney#Climate

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malta#Climate

I was going to add Birmingham, Alabama and Charleston, South Carolina but winters especially the lows are too cold to be called Subtropical.
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Old 09-24-2013, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Long Island
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I don't have strict definitions, but generally speaking:

• All months should average above freezing.
• At least 1/3rd of the year should average above the tropical threshold of 18C.
• Should average at least 30 inches (762mm) of precipitation.
• Hardiness zone of at least 7a, the limit of a lot of subtropical plant species.
• 3/5ths of the year (219 days) should be frost free, at the least.

There may be exceptions to these rules though.
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Old 09-24-2013, 08:40 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
Mild to hot summers, mild to warm winters.

Absolutely no snow or frost, apart from in record-breaking events.
The problem is if that where the criteria, then what would set subtropical places apart from tropical places?

The 1st criteria (though not the only) of a tropical climate is it is frost free.





Quote:
Originally Posted by Caleb Yeung View Post
What means subtropical?

Let's look at it this way....what means "subarctic or subpolar(E)" ?

A subarctic climate should have many of the attributes of a true arctic climate (F) (high latitude, very cold temps, always near/close to the polar vortex at 300 mb, arid...etc)....but with some forum of moderation of those conditions and less frequent.

So the same should apply to subtropical climates; What makes a climate tropical - warm/hot....high rainfall...humid/high dew points....vertical clouds most of the time....strong sun angle.....little seasonal variation....etc. So a subtropical climate should have these attributes in moderation and not all year.

If you look at this map....for the most part the areas that are in the "C" zone (or subtropical) work well. Their coldest month is around 45 F/8 C. While there are outliners near the edges of these zones where topography or landmass influnces things more...most of the stations in the C zone work every well. Remember of course, unlike tropical climates, there are three types of subtropical climates - the Cf (Humid) and Cs (Mediterranean) and even Bw (subtropical deserts):


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Old 09-24-2013, 08:43 AM
B87
 
Location: SW London
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wavehunter007 View Post
The problem is if that where the criteria, then what would set subtropical places apart from tropical places?

The 1st criteria (though not the only) of a tropical climate is it is frost free.
Sustained warm temperatures. Tropical would have means above 18-20C in every month, whereas a subtropical climate could have winter temperatures ranging from Scilly-like to Mediterranean island.
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Old 09-24-2013, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Rimini, Emilia-Romagna, Italy (440 N)
1,454 posts, read 466,061 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
I don't have strict definitions, but generally speaking:

• All months should average above freezing.
• At least 1/3rd of the year should average above the tropical threshold of 18C.
• Should average at least 30 inches (762mm) of precipitation.
• Hardiness zone of at least 7a, the limit of a lot of subtropical plant species.
• 3/5ths of the year (219 days) should be frost free, at the least.

There may be exceptions to these rules though.
With the exception of rainfall, I live in a subtropical climate according to your definition.
january average of 4,1C, 4 months >18C, 655 mm of rainfall, zone 9a and 250 frost-free days. Maybe dry subtropical?
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Old 09-24-2013, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Paris
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Gentlemen, prepare for more fighting as this is the Middle East conflict of the Weather Forum.

My (humble, personal) idea of the archetypal subtropical climate is Buenos Aires. No dry season, mildly cool winters on average, but with some freezing cold snaps or conversely warm or even hot winter days; warm to hot and humid summers.
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